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Re: square cap

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  • Hope Greenberg
    ... Not crazy at all! When collecting Tudor images, the headwear seemed to fall into three categories: many gable hoods, many french hoods, and a handful of
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 30, 2005
      > From: Kristine Elliott <souriete@...>
      > Maybe I am crazy, but I see several different (though related) headdresses listed together as women's "bonnets" at http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/bonnet.html .
      > The first: "Margaret Giggs (mislabeled Mother Jak) (Parker, pl. 8)" looks like she has a very similar cap to the one in "Lady With a Squirrel & Starling".

      Not crazy at all! When collecting Tudor images, the headwear seemed to
      fall into three categories: many gable hoods, many french hoods, and a
      handful of "others" that seemed to be, as you say, either the square
      cap, furry, variety, or the bonnet-over-linen-cap variety. I say linen
      cap but it actually seems to be a close fitted linen cap or band
      directly on the head, and then a stiffened cap, in some cases with bits
      wrapped around, and in some cases with an underchin tie, over that. And
      I suppose we could break it down further by bonnet--some are like men's
      bonnets and some are like berets. So much variety! But framing the face
      in something stiffened and squarish, like those square necklines, seems
      definitely to be the English fashion, while round seems to be French.
      Although of course, English ladies seem to have no trouble mixing the
      elements.

      - Hope
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