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Re: [SCA-Milliners] hat construction theories/felt

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  • kcncress@aol.com
    In a message dated 4/29/01 6:01:53 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Those of you with experience in felting know that the rougher you are with your ... Calontir
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2001
      In a message dated 4/29/01 6:01:53 PM Central Daylight Time,
      cvirtue@... writes:


      >
      >
      > Irmele von Grünsberg wrote:
      > > I know that mercury was used to stiffen felt in the 19th century.
      > > Does anyone know how long felt has been used for hats? The beauty
      > > of felt is that it can be steamed and re-shaped (in case of rain
      > > or being sat on).
      >
      > There is a felt sugarloaf hat among the Greenland bog finds, and many
      > depictions of what appears to me to be felted wool in illuminations. I am
      > one who will firmly say felt is period.
      >
      > Mercury was used in felting to "roughen" the smooth fibers of animals such
      > as beaver, and certain rabbits, so it would adhere to neighboring fibers.
      > This process is called carrotting, and obviously is no longer done.
      > Sheep's wool fibers don't need carrotting. (Also, rarely in period
      > references is the type of wool specified--don't always assume when you read
      > about wool, it was sheep's wool.)

      Those of you with experience in felting know that the rougher you are with
      your
      > wool hat batt, the "harder" and stiffer the felt will become. An 8" tall
      > German hat I did on commission, is still in service, and upity, after four
      > years. For most hats harder felt will hold up better, unless you want a
      > softer, squishier finish. If you have a hat outlet/factory close to you,
      > sometimes you can buy seconds, and have your way with them. Wetting and
      > shaping is so easy with commercial hat blanks. But go easy--they shrink
      >

      ------Dejaniera,
      Calontir


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Grace
      ... Thus the expression, mad as a hatter. Jessamyn
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2001
        >>
        >> Mercury was used in felting to "roughen" the smooth fibers of animals such
        >> as beaver, and certain rabbits, so it would adhere to neighboring fibers.
        >> This process is called carrotting, and obviously is no longer done.

        Thus the expression, "mad as a hatter."
        Jessamyn
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