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Re: [SCA-Milliners] beaded veil pic

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  • Hope Greenberg
    Cynthia said: http://www.kfki.hu/%7Earthp/art/m/memling/1early3/02last41.jpg ... I didn t provide much information with this image so here s some more
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 17, 2004
      Cynthia said:
      <> >http://www.kfki.hu/%7Earthp/art/m/memling/1early3/02last41.jpg
      >http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/15th/
      >I LOVE that one! I hadn't seen it before.

      I didn't provide much information with this image so here's some more to
      put it in context. I love how cosmopolitan and mobile this couple is!
      It's especially interesting to wonder how her clothing reflects
      Florentine, Bruges, and perhaps London fashion, as filtered through
      Memling's ideas. I've never found out whether she actually went with her
      husband to London.

      From:
      http://www.philipresheph.com/a424/gallery/flemish/flemish2.htm
      The work was commissioned by Angelo di Jacopo Tani, the Florentine
      manager of the Medici bank in London, for the altar of his newly founded
      Chapel of St Michael in Cosimo de'Medici's church of the Badia Fiesolana.
      The commission coincided with Tani's wedding in 1466 to Caterina
      Tanagli, with whom he is portrayed on the closed wings. Their
      escutcheons are mounted on the polygonal base of the niches.
      St Michael appears as the saint to whom the chapel was dedicated. Taken
      together, the grisailles depict the victory of St Michael over Satan,
      who was threatening the Virgin and Christ Child.
      The painting was completed before the birth of the couple's first
      daughter in 1471, and was dispatched to the port of Pisa from
      Southampton in 1473. The ship was intercepted by a Polish warship
      operating on behalf of the Hanseatic League and the painting was taken
      to Danzig (Gdansk), where it was to remain.


      From:
      http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/m/memling/1early3/02last4.html
      The closed altarpiece shows the donor and his wife kneeling in prayer,
      each before a niche containing respectively a statue of the Virgin and
      Child and St Michael battling with demons. Their escutcheons are mounted
      on the polygonal base of the niches. These were identified as belonging
      to the Florentines Angelo di Jacopo Tani (1415-1492) and Caterina di
      Francesco Tanagli (1446-1492). Tani was an agent of the Medici bank in
      Bruges in 1450, before becoming its manager in 1455. He was ousted by
      Tommaso Portinari in 1465. Tani married in Florence in 1466, and his
      wife bore a daughter (one of several) on 8 June 1471. He drew up his
      will on 12 December 1467, the same month as he was sent back north to
      save the London branch from bankruptcy. The holy figures represented
      here evidently relate first and foremost to the devotion of the donors.
      The coats-of-arms were originally reversed - in other words, the man's
      arms appeared in the woman's panel, and vice versa.

      Before departing for London in December 1467, Tani founded a chapel
      dedicated to St Michael at his employer's church in Fiesole and drew up
      his will. He probably also made funeral arrangements in the customary
      manner. He will then have required an altarpiece, which he ordered from
      Memling some time after the end of 1467 during his stay in the north.
      The painting was, therefore, largely executed during his stay in London
      between 1467 and 1469, from where he could monitor its progress. The
      iconography of the altarpiece is clarified by its destination. St
      Michael has been selected here first and foremost as the saint to whom
      the chapel was dedicated, and only in the second place as Tani's patron.
      This also explains the absence of the woman's patron. Taken together,
      the grisailles depict the victory of St Michael over Satan, who was
      threatening the Virgin and Christ Child.
    • Melissa
      1 more question. What do any of you think this veil is made out of? http://www.virtue.to/articles/images/1400s_veilbead2.jpg ...
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 17, 2004
        1 more question.
        What do any of you think this veil is made out of?
        http://www.virtue.to/articles/images/1400s_veilbead2.jpg

        --- In SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com, Hope Greenberg
        <hope.greenberg@u...> wrote:
        > Cynthia said:
        > <> >http://www.kfki.hu/%
        7Earthp/art/m/memling/1early3/02last41.jpg
        > >http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/15th/
        > >I LOVE that one! I hadn't seen it before.
        >
        > I didn't provide much information with this image so here's some
        more to
        > put it in context. I love how cosmopolitan and mobile this couple
        is!
        > It's especially interesting to wonder how her clothing reflects
        > Florentine, Bruges, and perhaps London fashion, as filtered through
        > Memling's ideas. I've never found out whether she actually went
        with her
        > husband to London.
        >
        > From:
        > http://www.philipresheph.com/a424/gallery/flemish/flemish2.htm
        > The work was commissioned by Angelo di Jacopo Tani, the Florentine
        > manager of the Medici bank in London, for the altar of his newly
        founded
        > Chapel of St Michael in Cosimo de'Medici's church of the Badia
        Fiesolana.
        > The commission coincided with Tani's wedding in 1466 to Caterina
        > Tanagli, with whom he is portrayed on the closed wings. Their
        > escutcheons are mounted on the polygonal base of the niches.
        > St Michael appears as the saint to whom the chapel was dedicated.
        Taken
        > together, the grisailles depict the victory of St Michael over
        Satan,
        > who was threatening the Virgin and Christ Child.
        > The painting was completed before the birth of the couple's first
        > daughter in 1471, and was dispatched to the port of Pisa from
        > Southampton in 1473. The ship was intercepted by a Polish warship
        > operating on behalf of the Hanseatic League and the painting was
        taken
        > to Danzig (Gdansk), where it was to remain.
        >
        >
        > From:
        > http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/m/memling/1early3/02last4.html
        > The closed altarpiece shows the donor and his wife kneeling in
        prayer,
        > each before a niche containing respectively a statue of the Virgin
        and
        > Child and St Michael battling with demons. Their escutcheons are
        mounted
        > on the polygonal base of the niches. These were identified as
        belonging
        > to the Florentines Angelo di Jacopo Tani (1415-1492) and Caterina
        di
        > Francesco Tanagli (1446-1492). Tani was an agent of the Medici bank
        in
        > Bruges in 1450, before becoming its manager in 1455. He was ousted
        by
        > Tommaso Portinari in 1465. Tani married in Florence in 1466, and
        his
        > wife bore a daughter (one of several) on 8 June 1471. He drew up
        his
        > will on 12 December 1467, the same month as he was sent back north
        to
        > save the London branch from bankruptcy. The holy figures
        represented
        > here evidently relate first and foremost to the devotion of the
        donors.
        > The coats-of-arms were originally reversed - in other words, the
        man's
        > arms appeared in the woman's panel, and vice versa.
        >
        > Before departing for London in December 1467, Tani founded a chapel
        > dedicated to St Michael at his employer's church in Fiesole and
        drew up
        > his will. He probably also made funeral arrangements in the
        customary
        > manner. He will then have required an altarpiece, which he ordered
        from
        > Memling some time after the end of 1467 during his stay in the
        north.
        > The painting was, therefore, largely executed during his stay in
        London
        > between 1467 and 1469, from where he could monitor its progress.
        The
        > iconography of the altarpiece is clarified by its destination. St
        > Michael has been selected here first and foremost as the saint to
        whom
        > the chapel was dedicated, and only in the second place as Tani's
        patron.
        > This also explains the absence of the woman's patron. Taken
        together,
        > the grisailles depict the victory of St Michael over Satan, who was
        > threatening the Virgin and Christ Child.
      • J. May
        My first inkling is fine linen. Samia ... 1 more question. What do any of you think this veil is made out of?
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 17, 2004
          My first inkling is fine linen.

          Samia

          -----Original Message-----

          1 more question.
          What do any of you think this veil is made out of?
          http://www.virtue.to/articles/images/1400s_veilbead2.jpg
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