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Some interesting information on the Atours

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  • Katherine Barich
    Hi all, I remember reading a TI article that advised that the hennin was a derogatory term for the headdress which was called an Atour. I recently checked out
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 7, 2004
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      Hi all,

      I remember reading a TI article that advised that the hennin was a derogatory
      term for the headdress which was called an Atour.

      I recently checked out on ILL a book "La Mode et son Vocabulaire, Quelques
      termes de la mode feminine au moyen age suivi dans leur evolution semantique"
      by Eva Rodhe Lundquist. It has an interesting section on the word Atour
      that I thought this crowd might find interesting.

      The author first states that in the 13th century the word autour meant an
      ornament or parure, but that in the 14th century it acquired a more restrained
      and concrete meanint the ensemble of ornaments that decorate or hide the
      hair of women.

      The following quote is next given, which comes from Quicherat (early costume
      historian) that quotes the chevalier de la Tour Landry. I quote it here
      in French and then will attempt a translation for everyone:

      "Une bonne dame me conta que en l'an 1371, elle et tout plein de dames et
      damoiselles estoitent venues à une feste de sainte Marguerite où tous les ans
      avoit grand essemblée. Et là vint une damoiselle mout cointe et moult jolie,
      mais qui estoit plus diversement atournée que nule des autres. Et pour son
      estrange atour, tous la venoient regarder comme une beste sauvage. Si luy
      demanda a la bonne dame: M'amie, comment appelez-vous cest autour? Et elle
      lui respondit que on l'appeloit l'atour du gibet. - Du gibet! dit la bonne
      dame; eh, bon Dieu! le nom n'est pas beau, mais l'atour est plaisant. Je
      demanday à la bonne dame la manière d'icelluy atour, et ell me le devisa; mais
      en bonne foy, je le retins petitement, fors tant qu'il me semble qu'elle me dist
      qu'il estoit hault levé sur longues epingles d'argent plus d'un doigt sur
      la teste, comme un gibet."

      A pretty lady told me that in the year 1371, that she and a group of ladies and
      demoiselles went to a feast of Saint Marguerite which was held every year. A
      demoiselle also came that was most coy and most pretty but whose atour was different from
      all others. And because of the strange atour, everyone looked at it like a wild
      beast. The pretty lady asked her: my friend, what is the name of this atour?
      And she responded that it was called the atour of the gibbet. The gibbet! said
      the pretty lady, oh good God, the name isn't pretty but the atour was pleasing.
      I asked the pretty lady about the manner of the this atour, and she advised me,
      but in good faith, I only remember a little, but it seems to me that she told
      me the it was held high on long pins of silver that held up a bar over the head,
      like a gibbet.

      Anyway, I am having a bit of trouble understanding the last sentence - so if
      anyone can help I would be most appreciative.

      Katherinie Barich
    • Cynthia Virtue
      ... Most fascinating! Wow. I can t think of anything in the known headdresses of 1371 that would look like this. The butterfly headdress is decades later,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 7, 2004
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        Katherine Barich wrote:
        > but in good faith, I only remember a little, but it seems to me that she told
        > me the it was held high on long pins of silver that held up a bar over the head,
        > like a gibbet.
        >
        > Anyway, I am having a bit of trouble understanding the last sentence - so if
        > anyone can help I would be most appreciative.

        Most fascinating! Wow.

        I can't think of anything in the known headdresses of 1371 that would
        look like this. The "butterfly" headdress is decades later, but could
        be described that way, providing my guesses are right about the wire
        support of the veil.

        --
        Cynthia Virtue and/or
        Cynthia du Pré Argent

        "Such virtue hath my pen...." -Shakespeare, Sonnet 81
        "I knew this wasn't _my_ pen!" --Cynthia V.
      • Noramunro@aol.com
        I m going to have to work on the French another time -- I m too bloody tired right now -- but on the subject of atours as a name for the headdress more
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 7, 2004
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          I'm going to have to work on the French another time -- I'm too bloody tired
          right now -- but on the subject of 'atours' as a name for the headdress more
          commonly called the hennin, the following article has some interesting
          information for 15th C England

          Sutton, Anne. "Dress and Fashions c. 1470." In Daily Life in the Middle Ages,
          edited by Richard Britnell. Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire: Sutton, 1998.
          6-26.

          regards,
          Alianora

          ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
          Dame Alianora Munro, OL, Atlantia
          the website: http://hometown.aol.com/noramunro/Chateau/index.htm
          the blog: http://damenora.diaryland.com


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Generys ferch Ednuyed
          What about those odd white hats in the Tres Riches Heures? Say, when they re riding (May or, hmm, August? Don t have it in front of me) - anyway, the ones that
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 8, 2004
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            What about those odd white hats in the Tres Riches Heures? Say, when they're
            riding (May or, hmm, August? Don't have it in front of me) - anyway, the
            ones that look like someone took a graduation mortarboard and draped a veil
            over it, sort of. The tres riches is 1400 or so, right? So having those a
            few years earlier could be plausible...

            Generys

            > -----Original Message-----
            > From:
            > sentto-312294-1540-1073524917-Generys=blazemail.com@...
            > oups.yahoo.com
            > [mailto:sentto-312294-1540-1073524917-Generys=blazemail.com@re
            > turns.groups.yahoo.com] On Behalf Of Cynthia Virtue
            > Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 8:23 PM
            > To: SCA-Milliners@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [SCA-Milliners] Some interesting information on
            > the Atours
            >
            > Katherine Barich wrote:
            > > but in good faith, I only remember a little, but it seems
            > to me that
            > > she told me the it was held high on long pins of silver
            > that held up a
            > > bar over the head, like a gibbet.
            > >
            > > Anyway, I am having a bit of trouble understanding the last
            > sentence -
            > > so if anyone can help I would be most appreciative.
            >
            > Most fascinating! Wow.
            >
            > I can't think of anything in the known headdresses of 1371
            > that would look like this. The "butterfly" headdress is
            > decades later, but could be described that way, providing my
            > guesses are right about the wire support of the veil.
            >
            > --
            > Cynthia Virtue and/or
            > Cynthia du Pré Argent
            >
            > "Such virtue hath my pen...." -Shakespeare, Sonnet 81
            > "I knew this wasn't _my_ pen!" --Cynthia V.
            >
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