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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] drying my basil leaves?

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  • Galefridus Peregrinus
    Put them on a cake cooling rack, if you have any. You want to have air circulating around them to promote drying without decay. -- Galefridus
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 10 7:25 AM
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      Put them on a cake cooling rack, if you have any. You want to have air circulating around them to promote drying without decay.

      -- Galefridus

      On Mar 10, 2013, at 9:50, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:

       

      I just plucked about 20 leaves of basil out of my indoor planter to
      stimulate more growth. I don't have any immediate need of the basil.
      Is there an easy way to dry the leaves? Right now they are all on a
      couple paper towels on paper plates sitting on my dining room table.

      --Laurel A. Rockefeller
      Author, Peers of Beinan Series

    • Kirk Spencer
      A limited alternative to drying is to make an herbal oil or vinegar. Another alternative is to freeze the leaves. If you do this, my personal preference is to
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 11 9:03 AM
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        A limited alternative to drying is to make an herbal oil or vinegar. Another alternative is to freeze the leaves. If you do this, my personal preference is to put a teaspoon of leaves in each slot of an ice cube tray and fill those trays with water. This helps reduce the effects of 'freezer burn' on the leaves. Final alternative, also freezing, is to purchase some dry ice and use that to freeze the leaves. If you're going that way there are more instructions to include safety issues, but the leaves I've done it to have held strength longer than drying.

        Kirklin

        >________________________________
        > From: Martin S <m_stigleman@...>
        >To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        >Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 7:04 AM
        >Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: drying my basil leaves?
        >
        >

        >If you have an older gas oven, place the leaves on a paper towel, directly on the rack set at the lowest level. Leave the door open just a bit to allow air circulation. The pilot light in the oven will work as a dehydrator...even the temperature is nearly the same. Usually a day or two will do it. You can also heat a cast iron skillet to very hot, then toss the leaves in (single layer) and allow it to cool. Remove the leaves and repeat as needed until they are dry.
        >A paper bag will also work but it will take longer and you have to keep it in a warm, dry place to prevent molding.
        >
        >YIS,
        >Brage Brokholst
        >
        >--- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> I just plucked about 20 leaves of basil out of my indoor planter to
        >> stimulate more growth.  I don't have any immediate need of the basil.
        >> Is there an easy way to dry the leaves?  Right now they are all on a
        >> couple paper towels on paper plates sitting on my dining room table.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> --Laurel A. Rockefeller
        >> Author, Peers of Beinan Series
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Rickard, Patty
        I find results from freezing to be much better than drying. From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kirk
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 11 9:48 AM
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          I find results from freezing to be much better than drying.

          From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kirk Spencer
          Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 12:04 PM
          To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: drying my basil leaves?

           

           

          A limited alternative to drying is to make an herbal oil or vinegar. Another alternative is to freeze the leaves. If you do this, my personal preference is to put a teaspoon of leaves in each slot of an ice cube tray and fill those trays with water. This helps reduce the effects of 'freezer burn' on the leaves. Final alternative, also freezing, is to purchase some dry ice and use that to freeze the leaves. If you're going that way there are more instructions to include safety issues, but the leaves I've done it to have held strength longer than drying.

          Kirklin

          >________________________________
          > From: Martin S <m_stigleman@...>
          >To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
          >Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 7:04 AM
          >Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: drying my basil leaves?
          >
          >

          >If you have an older gas oven, place the leaves on a paper towel, directly on the rack set at the lowest level. Leave the door open just a bit to allow air circulation. The pilot light in the oven will work as a dehydrator...even the temperature is nearly
          the same. Usually a day or two will do it. You can also heat a cast iron skillet to very hot, then toss the leaves in (single layer) and allow it to cool. Remove the leaves and repeat as needed until they are dry.
          >A paper bag will also work but it will take longer and you have to keep it in a warm, dry place to prevent molding.
          >
          >YIS,
          >Brage Brokholst
          >
          >--- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> I just plucked about 20 leaves of basil out of my indoor planter to
          >> stimulate more growth.  I don't have any immediate need of the basil.
          >> Is there an easy way to dry the leaves?  Right now they are all on a
          >> couple paper towels on paper plates sitting on my dining room table.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --Laurel A. Rockefeller
          >> Author, Peers of Beinan Series
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

        • Rachel Cundiff
          You should also be able to freeze them in ice cube trays (with water.) Then, when you need them, you defrost them and they are all new again ! -- Dum Vivo
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 11 3:33 PM
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            You should also be able to freeze them in ice cube trays (with water.)  Then, when you need them, you defrost them and they are all "new" again !

            --
            Dum Vivo Servio (While I live, I serve)
            Rachel Cundiff, OL
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