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hee hee hee Roses!

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  • Carowyn Silveroak
    Greetings! My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary) They ve been chopped by a food
    Message 1 of 12 , May 22 6:20 PM
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      Greetings!

      My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering
      away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary)

      They've been chopped by a food processor, and are starting the "simmer in
      an iron pan while topping off with water" step for the next few days.

      When I pull the rose "clay" out (after adding more petals that I get over
      the next few days), I'll form the beads around a large steel mandrel that
      I have from my glass bead kit.

      When the fresh petals are done.....I'm going to pull last year's petals
      out of the freezer, give 'em the same treatment, and see if there's a
      difference!

      I'm taking photos of each part of the process as I go.

      Fun!

      -Carowyn
      ____________________________________________________________
      53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
      The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
      http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4fbc3b9ddd89f1984e4fst01duc
    • Dianne Stucki
      I have a rosebush in my front yard that is going absolutely bonkers this year. I m pretty sure it isn t a period type, but in fact I don t know what type it
      Message 2 of 12 , May 23 5:14 AM
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        I have a rosebush in my front yard that is going absolutely bonkers this year. I'm pretty sure it isn't a period type, but in fact I don't know what type it is!
         
        I'll have to be sure and save the petals, though I doubt if I will actually wind up with enough to do anything substantial with. It's dripping with buds, but the blooms are quite small.
         
        I can't wait to see the pictures!

        Laurensa

        --- On Wed, 5/23/12, Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@...> wrote:

        From: Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@...>
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] hee hee hee Roses!
        To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 1:20 AM

         

        Greetings!

        My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering
        away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary)

      • Amy Provost
        I shall wait curiously to hear the difference between frozen and fresh! What an awesome experiment! This is on my list of things to do when I actually have
        Message 3 of 12 , May 23 6:30 AM
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          I shall wait curiously to hear the difference between frozen and fresh!
          What an awesome experiment!  This is on my list of "things to do when I actually have the time".

          Ameline

          On Tue, May 22, 2012 at 9:20 PM, Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@...> wrote:
           


          Greetings!

          My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering
          away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary)

          They've been chopped by a food processor, and are starting the "simmer in
          an iron pan while topping off with water" step for the next few days.

          When I pull the rose "clay" out (after adding more petals that I get over
          the next few days), I'll form the beads around a large steel mandrel that
          I have from my glass bead kit.

          When the fresh petals are done.....I'm going to pull last year's petals
          out of the freezer, give 'em the same treatment, and see if there's a
          difference!

          I'm taking photos of each part of the process as I go.

          Fun!

          -Carowyn
          __________________________________________________________
          53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
          The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4fbc3b9ddd89f1984e4fst01duc




          --
          www.crookedwall.org
          www.bthumbstudios.com
        • jack hollandbeck
          You have just caused me to wonder. How old are rose beads, and how long do they last? Can other petals be used for beads?Jack
          Message 4 of 12 , May 23 7:18 AM
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            You have just caused me to wonder. How old are rose beads, and how long do they last? Can other petals be used for beads?
            Jack

            > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            > From: silveroak@...
            > Date: Tue, 22 May 2012 21:20:34 -0400
            > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] hee hee hee Roses!
            >
            >
            > Greetings!
            >
            > My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering
            > away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary)
            >
            > They've been chopped by a food processor, and are starting the "simmer in
            > an iron pan while topping off with water" step for the next few days.
            >
            > When I pull the rose "clay" out (after adding more petals that I get over
            > the next few days), I'll form the beads around a large steel mandrel that
            > I have from my glass bead kit.
            >
            > When the fresh petals are done.....I'm going to pull last year's petals
            > out of the freezer, give 'em the same treatment, and see if there's a
            > difference!
            >
            > I'm taking photos of each part of the process as I go.
            >
            > Fun!
            >
            > -Carowyn
            > ____________________________________________________________
            > 53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
            > The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
            > http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4fbc3b9ddd89f1984e4fst01duc
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > -------------------------------------------------------------
            > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
            > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
            > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
            >
            > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
            > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
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          • Joyce Zeiler
            Jack- I teach a class on herbal beads. I use dried rose petals (some are a couple of years old) and we use dried herbs-lavender, basil, etc. I don t simmer
            Message 5 of 12 , May 23 7:40 AM
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              Jack-

              I teach a class on herbal beads.  I use dried rose petals (some are a couple of years old) and we use dried herbs-lavender, basil, etc.  I don't "simmer" any of my beads, but base my beads off Nostradamus "Rose Pills" recipe.  My oldest beads are about 5 years old.  I keep them in a glass jar out of the light.

              Morin

              On Wed, May 23, 2012 at 9:18 AM, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
               

              You have just caused me to wonder. How old are rose beads, and how long do they last? Can other petals be used for beads?
              Jack

              > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              > From: silveroak@...
              > Date: Tue, 22 May 2012 21:20:34 -0400
              > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] hee hee hee Roses!
              >
              >
              > Greetings!
              >
              > My fresh roses, from the period species in the garden, are now simmering
              > away! (Alba, damask, & apothecary)
              >
              > They've been chopped by a food processor, and are starting the "simmer in
              > an iron pan while topping off with water" step for the next few days.
              >
              > When I pull the rose "clay" out (after adding more petals that I get over
              > the next few days), I'll form the beads around a large steel mandrel that
              > I have from my glass bead kit.
              >
              > When the fresh petals are done.....I'm going to pull last year's petals
              > out of the freezer, give 'em the same treatment, and see if there's a
              > difference!
              >
              > I'm taking photos of each part of the process as I go.
              >
              > Fun!
              >
              > -Carowyn
              > ____________________________________________________________
              > 53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
              > The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
              > http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4fbc3b9ddd89f1984e4fst01duc
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------------
              > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
              > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
              > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
              >
              > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
              > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
              > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/
              >
              > <*> Your email settings:
              > Individual Email | Traditional
              >
              > <*> To change settings online go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/join
              > (Yahoo! ID required)
              >
              > <*> To change settings via email:
              > SCA-Herbalist-digest@yahoogroups.com
              > SCA-Herbalist-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >


            • aranwen_of_willowford
              Hi Morin! Funny timing, this thread - I was doing some reading online yesterday and came across that very Nostradamus recipe. I found it interesting to note
              Message 6 of 12 , May 23 8:54 AM
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                Hi Morin! Funny timing, this thread - I was doing some reading online yesterday and came across that very Nostradamus recipe. I found it interesting to note that actual period beads all seem to be troches or pastilles (flatter disks) instead of the rounded one, though the process is the same. I think I will try squishing mine into that shape when I make some more. I've since Gulf Wars made more at home with the petals from my own back yard! :) I picked up some of the gumtex (karaya) powder.

                I also picked up the oldest rosebushes I could get my hands on somewhat locally. It's an Autumn Damask. I also got a Blush damask. I am dying to get my hands on the actual Apothecary rose. It amazed me the difference in scent in the old non-hybrid varieties' petals, just when held in my hands. The petals are smaller, but more potent.

                Though my little Blush is but a wee bush yet, it is making blossoms here and there, and I'm saving all the petals I can. I am going to make dream pillows soon. :-)

                ~Lady Aranwen of Willow Ford



                --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Joyce Zeiler <joycehzeiler@...> wrote:
                >
                > Jack-
                >
                > I teach a class on herbal beads. I use dried rose petals (some are a
                > couple of years old) and we use dried herbs-lavender, basil, etc. I don't
                > "simmer" any of my beads, but base my beads off Nostradamus "Rose Pills"
                > recipe. My oldest beads are about 5 years old. I keep them in a glass jar
                > out of the light.
                >
                > Morin
                >
              • Carowyn Silveroak
                Greetings, ... If I recall correctly, the earliest references are just out of period. For beads, at least - Nostradamus recipe is for pastilles , little
                Message 7 of 12 , May 23 2:46 PM
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                  Greetings,
                   
                  >How old are rose beads
                   
                  If I recall correctly, the earliest references are just out of period.  For beads, at least - Nostradamus' recipe is for "pastilles", little pills.  The recipes I have are at the bottom of this email.
                   
                  >how long do they last?
                   
                  I've seen some last for decades, and I've head of others lasting 40-50 years if kept in an envelope or jar out of sunlight.
                   
                  >Can other petals be used for beads?
                   
                  I've certainly been thinking about tulips and apple blossoms!  That's an experiment, I think, for *next* year.....I'm thinking I have to look at what petals have high concentrations of oils, I think that's what helps form the rose clay (that holds the beads together).
                   
                  We had rain today so I didn't add any more rose petals to the mix, but I've been simmering yesterday's mixture all day, adding water when it gets thick.  It's much darker - I'm assuming the cast iron is working its magic - but there are a few shocking pink petal bits like confetti in there as well.
                   
                  >I also picked up the oldest rosebushes I could get my hands on somewhat
                  locally.  It's an Autumn Damask.  I also got a Blush damask.  I am dying to get my hands on the actual Apothecary rose.  It amazed me the difference in scent in the old non-hybrid varieties' petals, just when held in my hands. The petals are smaller, but more potent.
                   
                  Where are you located?  I'm in south-central Pennsylvania, and get my roses from a lady one county over who inherited her parents' farm but hates oinky & mooey & clucky things.  So she turned the whole thing into a *rose farm*.  How freaking cool is that?!?  Anyway, her damask roses come from a field in Afghanistan that can be dated to the late 1600's.  I think I can put you in touch with her; I'm not sure if she ships, I catch her at a local herb show.  $20 per rose.....can't beat it with a stick!
                   
                  >I'll have to be sure and save the petals, though I doubt if I will
                  actually wind up with enough to do anything substantial with. It's dripping with buds, but the blooms are quite small.
                   
                  Oh, they add up!  And if they're sniffy, stick 'em in the nasty vodka, you'll have rose perfume in a year!  That reminds me, I should decant the perfume I made from the rose petals last year....
                   
                  >I can't wait to see the pictures!
                  Yep, I'll put 'em on my secret website!  (I put up the other pics from last fall's event for you, if you haven't checked recently!)
                   
                  >This is on my list of "things to do when I actually have the
                  time".
                  I'd been meaning to do this for a while, then my life went *paff*, dealing with my idiot in-laws.....so I thought, phooey, the roses are blooming, it's TIME!  (And in cleaning out the idiot in-laws' house, we found a cast iron pan and a 1970's food processor.....hmm....serendipity, not looking a gift horse in the mouth!)
                   
                   
                  -plotting Carowyn
                   
                   
                   

                  Rose Recipes From Olden Times edited by Eleanor
                  Sinclair Rhode has these recipe and a 81 others (for
                  roses, not just for beads) mostly 16th century.

                  A Pomander
                  "Take a quarter ounce of Civet, a quarter and a half quarter of an ounce of Ambergreese, not half a quarter of an ounce of ye spiritt of Roses, 7 ounces of Benjamin, allmost a pound of Damask Rose-buds cutt. Lay gumdragon on rose water and with it make up your Pomander, with beads as big as nutmegs; when you make them up wash your hands with oyle of Jasmin to smooth them, then make them have a gloss; this quantity will make seaven bracelets.-Mary Doggett. Her Book of Receipts 1682."

                  TO MAKE ROSE BEADS FOR A ROSARY
                  "Gather the Roses on a dry day and chop the petals very finely. Put them in a saucepan and barely cover with water. Heat for about an hour but do not let the mixture boil. Repeat this process for the three days and if necessary add more water. The deep black beads made from rose petals are made this rich colour by warming in a rusty pan. It is important never to let the mixture boil but each day to warm it to a moderate heat. Make the beads by working the pulp with the fingers into balls. When thoroughly well worked and fairly dry press on to a bodkin to make the holes in the centres of the beads. Until they are perfectly dry the beads have to be moved frequently on the bodkin or they will be difficult to remove without breaking them. Held for a few moments in a warm hand these heads give out a pleasing fragrance. - Nineteenth century recipe."

                   


                  ____________________________________________________________
                  53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
                  The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
                  consumerproducts.com
                • Joyce Zeiler
                  I live in Central Arkansas. My home is in the woods, so I get very little sunlight, and nothing grows very well. Sound like your very lucky to be so close
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 30 9:39 AM
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                    I live in Central Arkansas.  My home is in the woods, so I get very little sunlight, and nothing grows very well.  Sound  like your very lucky to be so close to a rose farm.
                     
                    BTW, what is  the reference from TO MAKE ROSE BEADS FOR A ROSARY?
                     
                    Morin

                    On Wed, May 23, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@...> wrote:
                     

                     
                     
                    Greetings,
                     
                    >How old are rose beads
                     
                    If I recall correctly, the earliest references are just out of period.  For beads, at least - Nostradamus' recipe is for "pastilles", little pills.  The recipes I have are at the bottom of this email.
                     
                    >how long do they last?
                     
                    I've seen some last for decades, and I've head of others lasting 40-50 years if kept in an envelope or jar out of sunlight.
                     
                    >Can other petals be used for beads?
                     
                    I've certainly been thinking about tulips and apple blossoms!  That's an experiment, I think, for *next* year.....I'm thinking I have to look at what petals have high concentrations of oils, I think that's what helps form the rose clay (that holds the beads together).
                     
                    We had rain today so I didn't add any more rose petals to the mix, but I've been simmering yesterday's mixture all day, adding water when it gets thick.  It's much darker - I'm assuming the cast iron is working its magic - but there are a few shocking pink petal bits like confetti in there as well.
                     
                    >I also picked up the oldest rosebushes I could get my hands on somewhat locally.  It's an Autumn Damask.  I also got a Blush damask.  I am dying to get my hands on the actual Apothecary rose.  It amazed me the difference in scent in the old non-hybrid varieties' petals, just when held in my hands. The petals are smaller, but more potent.
                     
                    Where are you located?  I'm in south-central Pennsylvania, and get my roses from a lady one county over who inherited her parents' farm but hates oinky & mooey & clucky things.  So she turned the whole thing into a *rose farm*.  How freaking cool is that?!?  Anyway, her damask roses come from a field in Afghanistan that can be dated to the late 1600's.  I think I can put you in touch with her; I'm not sure if she ships, I catch her at a local herb show.  $20 per rose.....can't beat it with a stick!
                     
                    >I'll have to be sure and save the petals, though I doubt if I will actually wind up with enough to do anything substantial with. It's dripping with buds, but the blooms are quite small.
                     
                    Oh, they add up!  And if they're sniffy, stick 'em in the nasty vodka, you'll have rose perfume in a year!  That reminds me, I should decant the perfume I made from the rose petals last year....
                     
                    >I can't wait to see the pictures!
                    Yep, I'll put 'em on my secret website!  (I put up the other pics from last fall's event for you, if you haven't checked recently!)
                     
                    >This is on my list of "things to do when I actually have the time".
                    I'd been meaning to do this for a while, then my life went *paff*, dealing with my idiot in-laws.....so I thought, phooey, the roses are blooming, it's TIME!  (And in cleaning out the idiot in-laws' house, we found a cast iron pan and a 1970's food processor.....hmm....serendipity, not looking a gift horse in the mouth!)
                     
                     
                    -plotting Carowyn
                     
                     
                     

                    Rose Recipes From Olden Times edited by Eleanor
                    Sinclair Rhode has these recipe and a 81 others (for
                    roses, not just for beads) mostly 16th century.

                    A Pomander
                    "Take a quarter ounce of Civet, a quarter and a half quarter of an ounce of Ambergreese, not half a quarter of an ounce of ye spiritt of Roses, 7 ounces of Benjamin, allmost a pound of Damask Rose-buds cutt. Lay gumdragon on rose water and with it make up your Pomander, with beads as big as nutmegs; when you make them up wash your hands with oyle of Jasmin to smooth them, then make them have a gloss; this quantity will make seaven bracelets.-Mary Doggett. Her Book of Receipts 1682."

                    TO MAKE ROSE BEADS FOR A ROSARY
                    "Gather the Roses on a dry day and chop the petals very finely. Put them in a saucepan and barely cover with water. Heat for about an hour but do not let the mixture boil. Repeat this process for the three days and if necessary add more water. The deep black beads made from rose petals are made this rich colour by warming in a rusty pan. It is important never to let the mixture boil but each day to warm it to a moderate heat. Make the beads by working the pulp with the fingers into balls. When thoroughly well worked and fairly dry press on to a bodkin to make the holes in the centres of the beads. Until they are perfectly dry the beads have to be moved frequently on the bodkin or they will be difficult to remove without breaking them. Held for a few moments in a warm hand these heads give out a pleasing fragrance. - Nineteenth century recipe."

                     


                    ____________________________________________________________
                    53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
                    The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
                    consumerproducts.com


                  • silveroak@juno.com
                    Hi again! I just cleaned out my cast iron pan. My hands REEK (but in a good way!) of rose oil, and I have pastilles and beads and mold forms made of roses! I
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 30 3:13 PM
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                      Hi again!

                      I just cleaned out my cast iron pan. My hands REEK (but in a good way!) of rose oil, and I have pastilles and beads and mold forms made of roses!

                      I collected roses 4 times, every other day, pureed them, tossed them in the pan, mixed with what was already there, added water & stirred every hour that I had it simmering on low heat. Lather / rinse / repeat for the last...hmm, 6 or 7 days.

                      I kept a close eye on water - the roses soak it up like a sponge and hold it for a looong time. I had to squeeze some out and I made the beads, but there was a delicate balance - too much water squeezed out, and you have rose stuff that doesn't want to hold together. Add a bit back in, and you have a bead!

                      I made BIG beads, knowing they'd shrink a LOT. And they are! I started off with something the diameter of a quarter, and the first ones are below the diameter of a dime.

                      Adding in later roses didn't seem to affect it much. The last small batch went in last night after the storms came through, and I made the beads less than 24 hours later.

                      > I live in Central Arkansas. My home is in the woods, so I get very little sunlight, and nothing grows very well. Sound like your very lucky to be so close to a rose farm.

                      Hmm, you're still do-able as a trip. We have friends south of Little Rock - as a matter of fact, I just got back from a trip out there 2 months ago, and other friends just went out and back the beginning of this month! So I'll slip my roses and see if they take, then we'll take 'em on a trip....

                      My roses only really get morning sun anyway, so if you have a patch that gets an hour or two, stake it out! ;-) You'll have a year to find a spot! (Any indoors locations that it would work? Let's see if we can find a place....)

                      (Who, me, enabling?? Naaaaahhhh..... ;-)

                      >BTW, what is the reference from TO MAKE ROSE BEADS FOR A ROSARY?

                      That's the 19th century recipe at the bottom, but the one I mostly followed, since it's pretty simple. (Just roses & water in the cast iron pan, no binders or fixers.) I'm assuming they made enough beads to string them into a rosary when they were finished. Or even a paternoster, which might only be 10 beads. I think I have 24 beads, give or take, and I'm not done harvesting.

                      Nor have I started on the frozen rose petals, that'll be next after the fresh stops blooming!

                      (And, yes, I'm saving the dark rose water I squeezed out to check if it's as good a dye as I think it is!)

                      -Carowyn

                      P.S. Sorry for the public bandwidth....Roz, my email client crashed yesterday, so any emails I had from the last month is MIA and probably non-recoverable. Could you re-send your private message that I was going to answer now that the holiday's over?



                      ____________________________________________________________
                      53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
                      The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
                      http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4fc69bb1cc4c32192607st01duc
                    • aelfwyn@maine.rr.com
                      Carowyn, is this a non-coated standard cast iron pan? Does it turn the roses black as they simmer? How dark a shade is the dark rose water ? Did any oil
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 31 6:05 AM
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                        Carowyn, is this a non-coated standard cast iron pan? Does it turn the roses black as they simmer? How "dark" a shade is the "dark rose water"? Did any oil form ono the top of the pan durring the simmering and if so was it mixed back into the pulp before squeezing? Has anyone tried using the tiny, white shrub roses for doing this?Questions, questions, questions, sorry, but this project fascinates me.
                        Aelfwyn

                        ---- "silveroak@..." <silveroak@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi again!
                        >
                        > I just cleaned out my cast iron pan. >
                        > (And, yes, I'm saving the dark rose water I squeezed out to check if it's as good a dye as I think it is!)
                        >
                        > -Carowyn
                        >
                      • aranwen_of_willowford
                        Nice 3-part article about all of this http://paternosters.blogspot.com/2008/12/roses-revisited.html I found it very interesting :)
                        Message 11 of 12 , May 31 10:03 AM
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                          Nice 3-part article about all of this
                          http://paternosters.blogspot.com/2008/12/roses-revisited.html
                          I found it very interesting :)


                          --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, <aelfwyn@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Carowyn, is this a non-coated standard cast iron pan? Does it turn the roses black as they simmer? How "dark" a shade is the "dark rose water"? Did any oil form ono the top of the pan durring the simmering and if so was it mixed back into the pulp before squeezing? Has anyone tried using the tiny, white shrub roses for doing this?Questions, questions, questions, sorry, but this project fascinates me.
                          > Aelfwyn
                          >
                          > ---- "silveroak@..." <silveroak@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Hi again!
                          > >
                          > > I just cleaned out my cast iron pan. >
                          > > (And, yes, I'm saving the dark rose water I squeezed out to check if it's as good a dye as I think it is!)
                          > >
                          > > -Carowyn
                          > >
                          >
                        • silveroak@juno.com
                          Greetings again! ... It s a pretty old cast iron pan, liberated from the hoarded piles of junk from the Dreaded In-Laws house. 10.5 inches in diameter, 2-inch
                          Message 12 of 12 , May 31 12:22 PM
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                            Greetings again!

                            >Carowyn, is this a non-coated standard cast iron pan?

                            It's a pretty old cast iron pan, liberated from the hoarded piles of junk from the Dreaded In-Laws house. 10.5 inches in diameter, 2-inch high sides. It's *nice*, it was a shock to find it in piles of crap in their basement, and when they said it was useless and to throw it in the recycle bin......!!!

                            > Does it turn the roses black as they simmer?

                            Oh, yes! And it didn't take long at all! Even new additions to the pan were black within 2 hours of adding it to the mush that was already there.

                            >How "dark" a shade is the "dark rose water"?

                            Black when you look directly at it, dark brown when you tilt some up the glass wall.

                            >Did any oil form on the top of the pan during the simmering and if so was it mixed back into the pulp before squeezing?

                            Some oil formed, but I was keeping the water addition to a minimum, so most of it stayed in the rose mush. A lot of the oil got on my hands when I formed the last beads; it stayed on for about 8 hours!

                            > Has anyone tried using the tiny, white shrub roses for doing this?

                            I know I haven't. Do they have a scent? If so, add 'em in! If not, add 'em in anyway as "bulk" for the beads! (They will turn black in the pan, mine did!)

                            >Questions, questions, questions, sorry, but this project fascinates me.

                            There's nothing wrong with asking lots of questions! I caught enthusiasm from others, and passing it on is fun!

                            I'll be going out a little later on and collecting rose petals again for the next round. I'll keep reporting periodically, and when I get the pics up, I'll let you know!

                            -Carowyn




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