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Re: Mead

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  • Audrey
    Honey is mentioned in medical papyri from Egypt. It was used for many things, including making salves and as a skin softener.
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 1 2:09 PM
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      Honey is mentioned in medical papyri from Egypt. It was used for many things, including making salves and as a skin softener.
      --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
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      > Honey has been found as cargo on some Roman ship wrecks.Jack
      >
      > > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: m_stigleman@...
      > > Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 12:16:37 +0000
      > > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Mead
      > >
      > > Like most things in the world, honey would have been plentiful in some area and rare in others. Much would have depended on the particular regional society and thier particular advancement in beekeeping...it's a big world, and it's not like todays corporate spies ripping off IBM and selling to "Sprocket Micro-computers". Technology was spread by travelers, and it was selective on what those travelers would bother to learn. Think of it this way:
      > >
      > > traveler: "How do you make a cake?"
      > > villager: "Use flour, sugar, eggs, and milk"
      > > traveler: "Nice...How do you get flour?"
      > > villager: "Grind up wheat"
      > > traveler: "Okay, cool...How do you grind wheat?"
      > > villager: "Simple...Just use a millstone."
      > > traveler: "Oh, yea...Easy."
      > > "Ummm...How do you make a millstone?"
      > >
      > > Merchanting was a full time occupation, so most merchants would simply buy an item and resell it. They didn't have the time to "learn" to make it. Eventually someone would come along and learn how to make it and then go home and do it, but it may take years if not decades for that person to come along.
      > > The hardships of each region was also a major factor in the plentitude of bees. Modern knowledge of beekeeping wasn't available, so much was left to chance. Drout and severe storms would have damaged the bee hives or the source of pollen for the bees making the bee population suffer much more than those same occourances in modern times.
      > > So...Saying that bees were rare is like saying that trees are rare...VERY true if you live in the Sahara, but not so much if you are in the Amazon:)
      > >
      > > In Service,
      > > Brage Brokholst
      > >
      > > --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I haven't heard about a "mad honey" debacle. I don't think that bees were rare. Think about the ecology of pollinating plants. I think Pliny the Elder wrote about bee keeping. Like oyster farms, Romans exploited natural resources. They also loved flowers. Wine was flavored with honey. Romans did not, would not kill a bee. No, I believe that not only were bees plentiful, if not more than now, but that there was a lively bee culture. I will check my book on the history of food called "The History of Food."Jack
      > > >
      > > > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      > > > From: silveroak@
      > > > Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2011 13:20:52 -0400
      > > > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Mead
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      > > > If I recall correctly - and I could be very wrong! - not only were bees
      > > > sacred, they were pretty rare, weren't they? I remember reading about the
      > > > Roman "mad honey" debacle....
      > > >
      > > > So, if honey is rare, then mead should also be so?
      > > >
      > > > And, I remember getting into a lively discussion with another group,
      > > > concerning the placement of shoes at an archeological dig.....as soon as there's
      > > > something out of place (shoe), it's labeled "religious" and that's it. I
      > > > argued, haven't these people ever been around kids, especially young kids with
      > > > shoes they don't want to wear??
      > > >
      > > > As a parallel argument, I would posit that everything "rare" can be labeled
      > > > "sacred". It saves an argument, doesn't it? Someone sneaky / hurting
      > > > / needs a fix might grab the last bottle without twinge, but if you've already
      > > > invoked a god.....it's a little more difficult to get out of punishment!
      > > >
      > > > Just a thought whilst digging out from the hurricane,
      > > >
      > > > -Carowyn
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