Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [SCA-Herbalist] salve

Expand Messages
  • Rhonda Heyns
    Danke schon, and take your time. This project is mostly for my own benefit. I do editing work online for various authors of medieval/ancient Roman fan fiction,
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 30, 2011
      Danke schon, and take your time. This project is mostly for my own benefit. I do editing work online for various authors of medieval/ancient Roman fan fiction, and some of the things I have read sparked my interest. It told me that these authors were doing some research into their stories, and piqued my curiosity as to possible sources and other applications. (Things like bathing the back of a flogged soldier with watered honey[natural healer], or feeding a wounded soldier water mixed with poppy seed juice for the pain[morphine source]. where did these ideas come from? Were they really utilized, and what else can we learn from that time period?)
        Add to that the natural interest I have in natural/herbal healing practices, and you have one very interested and obsessed person, who cannot seem to find the right sources!
       Roma

      To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      From: original_xman@...
      Date: Sat, 27 Aug 2011 10:10:01 -0500
      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] salve

       

      Guten morgen. Give me some time to hack through my bibliography to see what I have. Mom was released from the hospital yesterday so I am kinda busy again. I will give you fair warning, though, I don't think that I have one single source for the Roman medic (which is battlefield medicine.) There is soooooo little, and like all research, much of what I know is cobbled together from odd pieces from all over the place. This material then has to be extrapolated. There is more known about the Byzantine system, which was a further development of earlier Roman ideas. In the 4th/5th centuries there is little information about a lot of things. It seems the barbarian successor kingdoms didn't bother with libraries. We also have to extrapolate from the fact that Marcus Aurelius tasked Galen of Pergamum to revamp the entire military medicine. We know quite a bit about the military hospital but not the medic. We also have to extrapolate from known medical practices that are often not applicable to the medic. Imagine the medic running up and asking a soldier, "What's your astrological sign?" lol There are some good works about medicine, but none about the medic. For example, one book from Osprey publishing tells of an "arrow puller." That is a spoon like tool to go in and retrieve an arrowhead (attached or not attached to the shaft) so that it does not do more damage when removed. That last sentence is almost the total entry in the book. Most has to be educated guess work. I will see what I can dig up in between bandaging my mom. lol
      Jack


      To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      From: roma1358@...
      Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2011 19:07:22 +0000
      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] salve




      I, too would like some sources for battlefield/ancient Roman/Greek medicine. Please?
      Roma


      To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      From: original_xman@...
      Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2011 09:38:42 -0500
      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] salve

       

      Yup, at least from the patient's view point. I liken the last vestige of the medicine man/shaman left is now called "bedside manner." lol
      Jack


      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      From: joycehzeiler@...
      Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 12:23:43 -0500
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] salve



      <Magic was always a part of medicine>
      Isn't it still, in some form or another?? ;)
       
      m

      On Wed, Aug 24, 2011 at 12:13 PM, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
       

      Yep, not good history at all. Maximus was dead, Commodus bleached his hair and dressed up like Hercules, Wallace was a knight, and it was Bruce who had leprosy and not his dad. Oh, Bruce changed sides as much as anybody else. Woad "tattoos" were out of date for about 1000 years. lol I will be glad to give what I can, but I have to say that my research is Late Roman. As mom's caregiver I call myself a "capsarius." That means "bandage man" and was the Roman battlefield medic. Oh, don't forget the use of charms and prayers (Xtian charms), too. Magic was always a part of medicine. lol
      Jack

      Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2011 09:54:45 -0500

      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] salve



      Yep, "Gladiator" and "Braveheart".  What a way to mess up good history.
       
      I had started working on research for battlefield medicine, might need to contact you and pick your brain.
       
      M
       
       
      On Wed, Aug 24, 2011 at 8:57 AM, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
       

      Nope, no brands or tattoo's either. lol It is just part of my research on the Late Roman Army. There are some references to military brands and/or tattoo's. It is not clear whether these were for punishment, identification or just identity. The movie "Gladiator" is NOT a resource on this, it is Hollywood, but may reflect a reality. Warriors have always sought out ways to identify themselves as such. In fact, Roman law laid out some distinguishing dress for all classes including the military. I reason that some units or individuals did use brands or tattoo's as part of an initiation ritual, ergo would have had the regimental surgeon or medics slap some salve on afterwards. After all the Roman army was pampered medically. That is the short version. lol 
      Jack


      From: joycehzeiler@...
      Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 12:50:32 -0500

      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] salve



      Hi Jack
       
      Well, I just made a salve for windburned lips, might hold the same principle for other parts on a burned body.  Marjoram in rendered suet.  Really made up a nice ointment. From the Widowes Treasure by John Partridge.  You could also try roses in honey without "greek pitch" from the Trotula.
       
      Morin
       
      Just askin-- did you get branded????

      On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 11:29 AM, Richard <original_xman@...> wrote:
       
      Good morning. I may have missed this from earlier strands......what would be a good period salve for use after a tattoo or a brand?
      Jack



















    • Charlie Farrow
      Leek juice. The oldest known description of tattoo techniques together with a formula for tattoo ink, is found in Medicae artis principes by the sixth century
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 6, 2011
        Leek juice.



        The oldest known description of tattoo techniques together with a
        formula for tattoo ink, is found in Medicae artis principes by the
        sixth century Roman physician, Aetius.

        He writes:

        Stigmates are the marks that are made on the face and other parts of
        the body. We see such marks on the hands of soldiers. To perform the
        operation they use ink made according to this formula:

        Egyptian pine wood (acacia) and especially the bark, one pound;
        corroded bronze, two ounces; gall, two ounces; vitriol, one ounce. Mix
        well and sift.

        Grind the corroded bronze with vinegar and mix it with the other
        ingredients to make a powder. Soak the powder in two parts of water
        and one part of leek juice and mix thoroughly.

        First wash the place to be tattooed with leek juice and then prick in
        the design with pointed needles until blood is drawn. Then rub in the
        ink.


        Lynsey Allason Jones is the expert in Roman tattoos (her book Women in
        Roman Britain is excellent too!)
        http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press.office/press.release/item/1156851242

        Charlie



        On 24 August 2011 14:57, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Nope, no brands or tattoo's either. lol It is just part of my research on the Late Roman Army. There are some references to military brands and/or tattoo's. It is not clear whether these were for punishment, identification or just identity. The movie "Gladiator" is NOT a resource on this, it is Hollywood, but may reflect a reality. Warriors have always sought out ways to identify themselves as such. In fact, Roman law laid out some distinguishing dress for all classes including the military. I reason that some units or individuals did use brands or tattoo's as part of an initiation ritual, ergo would have had the regimental surgeon or medics slap some salve on afterwards. After all the Roman army was pampered medically. That is the short version. lol
        > Jack
        >
        > ________________________________
        > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        > From: joycehzeiler@...
        > Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2011 12:50:32 -0500
        > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] salve
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Jack
        >
        > Well, I just made a salve for windburned lips, might hold the same principle for other parts on a burned body.  Marjoram in rendered suet.  Really made up a nice ointment. From the Widowes Treasure by John Partridge.  You could also try roses in honey without "greek pitch" from the Trotula.
        >
        > Morin
        >
        > Just askin-- did you get branded????
        >
        > On Tue, Aug 23, 2011 at 11:29 AM, Richard <original_xman@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Good morning. I may have missed this from earlier strands......what would be a good period salve for use after a tattoo or a brand?
        > Jack
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.