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old home remedies

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  • Richard
    I came across some tantalizing hints at medical treatments that I thought that I would share. Perhaps you can add some veracity here. I have been reading a
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 4, 2010
      I came across some tantalizing hints at medical treatments that I thought that I would share. Perhaps you can add some veracity here. I have been reading a book called "At Day's Close" by A. Roger Ekirch. In it he quotes Paolo da Certaldo (obviously Portuguese c. 16-17th Century, end of your period) about some of his home remedies. Apparently da Certaldo used Castile soap pills and rhubarb as treatments, or elements of treatments for illness. One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache. I love the visual!
      Jack
    • Lila Richards
      ... I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of warmed
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 4, 2010
        > One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.
        > I love the visual!

        I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
        onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
        warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
        a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.

        Sinech.

        ________________________________________________________
        Lila Richards, author of A Different Hunger
        A Dark Fantasy published by Bluewood Publishing.
        Now available from: http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Blueshop/
        Paperback edition coming soon!


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      • Avacyn
        Onion is an old folk remedy for ear ache. And soap is used to help the bowels move, so these could be correct. Avacyn
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
          Onion is an old folk remedy for ear ache. And soap is used to help
          the bowels move, so these could be correct.
          Avacyn
          >> One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.
          >> I love the visual!
          > I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
          > onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
          > warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
          > a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.
          >
          > Sinech.
        • jack hollandbeck
          We are of the same generation, but mom used warm olive oil to treat earaches, and I had a lot.Jack
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
            We are of the same generation, but mom used warm olive oil to treat earaches, and I had a lot.
            Jack

            > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            > From: lilar@...
            > Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 18:05:49 +1200
            > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] old home remedies
            >
            > > One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.
            > > I love the visual!
            >
            > I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
            > onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
            > warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
            > a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.
            >
            > Sinech.
            >
            > ________________________________________________________
            > Lila Richards, author of A Different Hunger
            > A Dark Fantasy published by Bluewood Publishing.
            > Now available from: http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Blueshop/
            > Paperback edition coming soon!
            >
            >
            > __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5423 (20100904) __________
            >
            > The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
            >
            > http://www.eset.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > -------------------------------------------------------------
            > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
            > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
            > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
            >
            > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
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          • jack hollandbeck
            Thank you.
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
              Thank you.

              > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              > From: avacyn@...
              > Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 00:30:25 -0700
              > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] old home remedies
              >
              > Onion is an old folk remedy for ear ache. And soap is used to help
              > the bowels move, so these could be correct.
              > Avacyn
              > >> One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.
              > >> I love the visual!
              > > I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
              > > onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
              > > warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
              > > a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.
              > >
              > > Sinech.
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------------
              > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
              > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
              > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
              >
              > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
              > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
              > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]Yahoo! Groups Links
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              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/
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            • Amy Provost
              Mullein blossoms extracted in olive oil is used for earaches. On Sun, Sep 5, 2010 at 11:03 AM, jack hollandbeck
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
                Mullein blossoms extracted in olive oil is used for earaches.

                On Sun, Sep 5, 2010 at 11:03 AM, jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...> wrote:
                 

                We are of the same generation, but mom used warm olive oil to treat earaches, and I had a lot.

                Jack

                > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                > From: lilar@...
                > Date: Sun, 5 Sep 2010 18:05:49 +1200
                > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] old home remedies
                >
                > > One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.
                > > I love the visual!
                >
                > I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
                > onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
                > warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
                > a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.
                >
                > Sinech.
                >
                > ________________________________________________________
                > Lila Richards, author of A Different Hunger
                > A Dark Fantasy published by Bluewood Publishing.
                > Now available from: http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Blueshop/
                > Paperback edition coming soon!
                >
                >
                > __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5423 (20100904) __________
                >
                > The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
                >
                > http://www.eset.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > -------------------------------------------------------------
                > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
                > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
                > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
                >
                > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
                > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
                > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/
                >
                > <*> Your email settings:
                > Individual Email | Traditional
                >
                > <*> To change settings online go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/join
                > (Yahoo! ID required)
                >
                > <*> To change settings via email:
                > SCA-Herbalist-digest@yahoogroups.com
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              • Dana Kramer-Rolls
                Here is a tradition from England: Half a freshly cut onion on a bee sting will relieve the swelling - assuming you are neither allergic to onions nor bees.
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010

                  Here is a tradition from England:  Half a freshly cut onion on a bee sting will relieve the swelling – assuming you are neither allergic to onions nor bees.

                   

                  Maythen

                   

                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lila Richards
                  Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2010 11:06 PM
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] old home remedies

                   

                   

                  > One time he put a roasted onion (scallion) in his ear to treat an earache.

                  > I love the visual!

                  I can see how that would work - the heat and the antiseptic qualities of
                  onion. When I was a kid (50+ years ago), my mother used to use drops of
                  warmed camphorated oil for the same purpose. I remember going to school with
                  a plug of cotton wool in my ear to keep the oil in.

                  Sinech.

                  ________________________________________________________
                  Lila Richards, author of A Different Hunger
                  A Dark Fantasy published by Bluewood Publishing.
                  Now available from: http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Blueshop/
                  Paperback edition coming soon!

                  __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5423 (20100904) __________

                  The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                  http://www.eset.com

                • Lila Richards
                  ... Honey also works well on bee stings (my father was a beekeeper), but neither honey nor onion should be used on wasp stings, which require something
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
                    > Here is a tradition from England: Half a freshly cut onion on a bee sting
                    > will relieve the swelling - assuming you are neither allergic to onions
                    > nor
                    > bees.

                    Honey also works well on bee stings (my father was a beekeeper), but neither
                    honey nor onion should be used on wasp stings, which require something
                    alkaline (or is it acidic? The opposite of what onions and honey are,
                    anyway).

                    Sinech.

                    ________________________________________________________
                    Lila Richards, author of A Different Hunger
                    A Dark Fantasy published by Bluewood Publishing.
                    Now available from: http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Blueshop/
                    Paperback edition coming soon!


                    __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5425 (20100905) __________

                    The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                    http://www.eset.com
                  • Shield of Peace
                    ... If I recall correctly, the pain inflicted by bees, wasps, hornets and some biting ants is caused by formic acid in their venom. So something weak and basic
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
                      On Sun, Sep 5, 2010 at 8:36 PM, Lila Richards <lilar@...> wrote:
                       

                      > Here is a tradition from England: Half a freshly cut onion on a bee sting
                      > will relieve the swelling - assuming you are neither allergic to onions
                      > nor
                      > bees.

                      Honey also works well on bee stings (my father was a beekeeper), but neither
                      honey nor onion should be used on wasp stings, which require something
                      alkaline (or is it acidic? The opposite of what onions and honey are,
                      anyway).


                      If I recall correctly, the pain inflicted by bees, wasps, hornets and some biting ants is caused by formic acid in their venom. So something weak and basic like baking soda might help.

                      Incidentally, hornets will attack someone who has already been stung en masse because their venom also contains a scent hormone that alerts the rest of the nest to an intruder. They home in on you like heat seeking missiles, especially if you've crushed one or more of them. It's pretty scary if you're not expecting it.

                      If this happens, a good idea is to find a nearby juniper or pine and run into it's branches, or use a freshly fallen or cut branch. Any strongly scented plant or flower should work. The heavy scent confuses the critters and can help ward them off. When this happened to me I grabbed a freshly cut branch of juniper and ran through the woods with it waving it around like a sacred talisman and rubbing the leaves on my arms, fleeing the angry buggies. It's funny now, I guess. Point is, it worked. Only got stung 3 times.

                      Aquilina
                    • silveroak@juno.com
                      Greetings, ... That scent oil is *banana oil*. Which means, you really have to be careful come fall when the stinging creatures start to go loco in the cold
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
                        Greetings,

                        >Incidentally, hornets will attack someone who has already been stung en masse because their venom also contains a scent hormone that alerts the rest of the nest to an intruder. They home in on you like heat seeking missiles, especially if you've crushed one or more of them. It's pretty scary if you're not expecting it.<

                        That scent oil is *banana oil*. Which means, you really have to be careful come fall when the stinging creatures start to go loco in the cold temps, and someone comes along munching on that yellow fruit...

                        We had a very bad experience in college, when our idiot chem prof decided we needed to make synthetic banana oil as our fall project. I asked him in no uncertain terms if he was barking mad, he told me to shut up because what was a mere student doing talking to someone with a PhD (and still wet behind the ears, he only had it 4 months), I told him to confirm it with my bio prof (he didn't), and then he wondered why the whole chem building was mad at him because we couldn't leave due to the angry buzzing that covered almost every available exit! We had to sneak out the emergency exit off the nuclear / dangerous explosives unit many hours after dinner was over, *that* was fun! And I made it clear to all & sundry who the culprit was...

                        My bio prof pulled him aside the very next morning - my chem prof was hard of hearing, so my bio prof yelled extra loud to get the point across, at least that's all we can surmise since we heard him throughout all levels and rooms of a 3-story building....

                        -Carowyn



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                      • Shield of Peace
                        ... Ah, something to keep in mind for Ostgardr s upcoming Queens Farms demo. We are conveniently placed right next to the beehives, and they were going crazy
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 5, 2010
                          On Sun, Sep 5, 2010 at 10:56 PM, silveroak@... <silveroak@...> wrote:


                          >Incidentally, hornets will attack someone who has already been stung en masse because their venom also contains a scent hormone that alerts the rest of the nest to an intruder. They home in on you like heat seeking missiles, especially if you've crushed one or more of them. It's pretty scary if you're not expecting it.<

                          That scent oil is *banana oil*. Which means, you really have to be careful come fall when the stinging creatures start to go loco in the cold temps, and someone comes along munching on that yellow fruit...

                          Ah, something to keep in mind for Ostgardr's upcoming Queens Farms demo. We are conveniently placed right next to the beehives, and they were going crazy for somebody's jelly donuts last year. We were using sandalwood incense and my juniper oil to try to keep them away, but it didn't last too long. Nobody got stung, though. Guess there were no banana cremes in there. Hopefully those who provide the demo food will rethink the sugary delights this year.

                          That it's an oil also explains why an hour after my incident with the hornets, another one came flying around acting suspiciously aggressive. I'd accidentally crushed a few and the scent was still on me even after an hour.

                          Aquilina
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