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RE: [SCA-Herbalist] Need some good research directions...

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  • Dana Kramer-Rolls
    Come now! Whatever your personal notions about pro-life or abortion, knowing how to control contraception was a very vital part of herbalism, especially if
    Message 1 of 38 , Jul 16, 2010
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      Come now!  Whatever your personal notions about pro-life or abortion, knowing how to control contraception was a very vital part of herbalism, especially if the Church was so dead set on a pro-natalist policy of population growth.  A woman who had had numerous children might need these services to save her life (or to keep her whole family from starving from limited resources), to say nothing of a married woman or unmarried girl who might have needed similar services for social reasons  The Church, at some point, issued guidelines to confessors, which clearly state that the product of rape is just dandy.  In fact, rape was not as serious a crime since it worked toward procreation, in its own twisted way.  The fact that women were able to control their breeding at all is a marvelous story.  And, if you know your Shakespeare, a nasty thing one man could say to another that he was sieved through a silk handkerchief. So reproductive herbology is as vital as digestive herbology.    

       

      From some demographic work done in the 80s, a common way in Eastern Europe to induce was with a goose feather, to break the amniotic sac.  It so often resulted in fatal sepsis, that the problem of an unwanted child was moot.  Herbs may be less effective, but safer.

       

      About humours, I suspect a lot of local herb wives didn’t know diddly about humours, but knew what helped a child with colic or an old man with gas.

       

      Sir Maythen

      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Karen Tricomo
      Sent: Friday, July 16, 2010 9:59 AM
      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Need some good research directions...

       

       

      No, that's the absolute LAST thing I'd need/want to know about...
       

      Catherine

       


      From: "Rickard, Patty" RICKARPA@...
       

      Is this the book? If so, it’s at Amazon.com

       

      Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance

      John M. Riddle

      John M. Riddle (Author)

      Visit Amazon's John M. Riddle Page

      Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

      See search results for this author

      Are you an author? Learn about Author Central

       

       

      Also a book entitled "Aborifacts and Contraception from Ancient to Renaissance Days" is a wonderful book...if you can find it

       

      Cempestra O'Breoniann

       

      One cannot silly-walk into Mordor.

       

    • Eneko Arteaga
      ... Knowing the specific route your character takes is important for all sorts of reasons, not the least which plants she is likely to encounter. Within towns
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 19, 2010
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        "Karen Tricomo" <piccolopwr@...> wrote:
        >
        >"Mid-12th Century, England (most typically).. .but it's more the general
        >"European" vs "Eastern" setting..."

        Knowing the specific route your character takes is important for all
        sorts of reasons, not the least which plants she is likely to
        encounter. Within towns and villages, the plants raised in gardens
        would be similar in a set of climatically-determined bands running
        roughly east-to-west such as Toledo/Sicily/Athens/Ephesus/Jerusalem or
        San Sebastian/Lyon/Florence/Constantinople or
        London/Amsterdam/Rhineland or Edinburgh/Oslo/Uppsala...

        The plants in the wild, however, can be distinctly different depending
        on location in the continent (including elevation, proximity to the
        coast, rainfall and soil type). Nothing blasts historical realism like
        an unfamiliarity with the actual land the events happen in/on!

        Eneko

        --
        “Izena duan guztia omen da”—Everything that has a name exists
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