Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-Herbalist] teasel

Expand Messages
  • Lila Richards
    ... It does, although I suppose you could thereby create an entire new set of misconceptions. :-) But I certainly think it pays not to take too much notice of
    Message 1 of 33 , Feb 12, 2010
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      > Pretty much. Speculating on the druids can be a full time profession. lol
      > I like to use other language than what has already been used to describe
      > them. I do that for everything because I used to do some counseling and
      > teach special education so I had to find alternative explanations, and
      > because by not using the "usual" words I try to avoid any built in
      > misconceptions. Does that make sense?<

      It does, although I suppose you could thereby create an entire new set of
      misconceptions. :-) But I certainly think it pays not to take too much
      notice of the Roman propaganda about them.

      >Anyway, what we may have had in the druids was the genesis of a
      >proto-priestly elite. Think of the druids, NOT in classical terms, but in
      >the development of a civilization like Egypt, Babylonia, Indus Valley. The
      >usual development in civilization was to plant, then the rise of a military
      >elite (we have that in the Celts), then the rise of a priesthood around a
      >temple cult. Those priesthoods were the intellectual leaders and
      >controllers for their civilizations. I think that is what the druids
      >were....the proto-priesthood for this undiscovered lost civilization of
      >Celts. This avoids all the misconceptions by the Greeks, Romans, and
      >Christian bishops. The druids were trained to be the local elites with a
      >core of necessary skills and knowledge (college), but could also specialize
      >and cross train. This extra education would account for the classic "up to
      >twenty years of training" in the classical literature. They kept order by
      >enforcing the natural laws of the gods, I think. That would include the
      >natural order in planting, plant use, inter-personal and inter-tribal
      >relations, relations with the gods, weather, and every other thing. They
      >monitored the natural machinery of the world and life for the gods.
      >Naturally they would have to be able to observe, understand, translate and
      >make use of every thing in their environment. A thistle curry comb was no
      >different than a flight of birds or a rainbow to them. They were all part
      >of the natural machinery. Okay, enough of this, I am starting to have fun.
      >I guess that I have tried to back off and look at them from a different
      >perspective, in this case anthropologically. I don't see them as great
      >mystics (though some were, take the myrdden?) or nature freaks or
      >super-environmentalists. I think they did much as this group
      >does......experiment and learn from each other. In their plant lore I don't
      >think that they were much different from you....scholars, agronomists and
      >scientists. That is kind of a fun way to look at it. They were the handimen
      >and women of the gods. That is also one explanation of a priesthood.<

      I think they were probably similar to the Maori tohunga or his equivalent in
      African cultures, who was a priest (probably in a more or less shamanic
      sense), and also the repository of the tribe's lore and history, and as
      such, having a very high status in the tribe.


      >There is some thought that the classic Irish tales, such as the Tain bo
      >Cuailnge (?), may have come from the time of the Irish migrations in the
      >3rd or 4th century CE. lol A family album of a hostile takeover.<

      They do seem to refer to a time when the politics of Ireland were in a state
      of flux, and clan territories, etc., being established, so this could well
      be the case.

      Cheers,

      Sinech.


      * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
      An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World





      __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4862 (20100212) __________

      The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

      http://www.eset.com
    • Lila Richards
      ... It does, although I suppose you could thereby create an entire new set of misconceptions. :-) But I certainly think it pays not to take too much notice of
      Message 33 of 33 , Feb 12, 2010
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        > Pretty much. Speculating on the druids can be a full time profession. lol
        > I like to use other language than what has already been used to describe
        > them. I do that for everything because I used to do some counseling and
        > teach special education so I had to find alternative explanations, and
        > because by not using the "usual" words I try to avoid any built in
        > misconceptions. Does that make sense?<

        It does, although I suppose you could thereby create an entire new set of
        misconceptions. :-) But I certainly think it pays not to take too much
        notice of the Roman propaganda about them.

        >Anyway, what we may have had in the druids was the genesis of a
        >proto-priestly elite. Think of the druids, NOT in classical terms, but in
        >the development of a civilization like Egypt, Babylonia, Indus Valley. The
        >usual development in civilization was to plant, then the rise of a military
        >elite (we have that in the Celts), then the rise of a priesthood around a
        >temple cult. Those priesthoods were the intellectual leaders and
        >controllers for their civilizations. I think that is what the druids
        >were....the proto-priesthood for this undiscovered lost civilization of
        >Celts. This avoids all the misconceptions by the Greeks, Romans, and
        >Christian bishops. The druids were trained to be the local elites with a
        >core of necessary skills and knowledge (college), but could also specialize
        >and cross train. This extra education would account for the classic "up to
        >twenty years of training" in the classical literature. They kept order by
        >enforcing the natural laws of the gods, I think. That would include the
        >natural order in planting, plant use, inter-personal and inter-tribal
        >relations, relations with the gods, weather, and every other thing. They
        >monitored the natural machinery of the world and life for the gods.
        >Naturally they would have to be able to observe, understand, translate and
        >make use of every thing in their environment. A thistle curry comb was no
        >different than a flight of birds or a rainbow to them. They were all part
        >of the natural machinery. Okay, enough of this, I am starting to have fun.
        >I guess that I have tried to back off and look at them from a different
        >perspective, in this case anthropologically. I don't see them as great
        >mystics (though some were, take the myrdden?) or nature freaks or
        >super-environmentalists. I think they did much as this group
        >does......experiment and learn from each other. In their plant lore I don't
        >think that they were much different from you....scholars, agronomists and
        >scientists. That is kind of a fun way to look at it. They were the handimen
        >and women of the gods. That is also one explanation of a priesthood.<

        I think they were probably similar to the Maori tohunga or his equivalent in
        African cultures, who was a priest (probably in a more or less shamanic
        sense), and also the repository of the tribe's lore and history, and as
        such, having a very high status in the tribe.


        >There is some thought that the classic Irish tales, such as the Tain bo
        >Cuailnge (?), may have come from the time of the Irish migrations in the
        >3rd or 4th century CE. lol A family album of a hostile takeover.<

        They do seem to refer to a time when the politics of Ireland were in a state
        of flux, and clan territories, etc., being established, so this could well
        be the case.

        Cheers,

        Sinech.


        * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
        An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World





        __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4862 (20100212) __________

        The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

        http://www.eset.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.