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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

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  • Mindslashed
    I ll be honest that I don t know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 29, 2009
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      I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
      Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
      I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
      Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
      And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
      It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!


      -Kuromori Fumiyo 
       Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist


      --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:

      From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
      Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM

       

      Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

      Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
      Thanks,
      Jack


    • Dyddgu
      Catnip is wonderful in tea form, I love to drink at night to relax me from a hectic day. Catnip mixed with a bit of basil or dandelion leaf makes a great
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 1, 2009
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        Catnip is wonderful in tea form, I love to drink at night to relax me from a hectic day. Catnip mixed with a bit of basil or dandelion leaf makes a great pesto! I have a few recipes if anyone is interested. Once again though I doubt they are period.

        Here is information on catnip, I know its not period (then again it could be:) however it is herbal related.

        CATNIP

        Latin Name: Nepeta cataria

        Alternate Names: Catmint, Catnep, Chi Hsueh Tsao (Chinese), Field Balm

        Family: LAMIACEAE

        Parts Used: Leaves.

        Properties: Anodyne, Antibacterial, Antidiarrheal, Antispasmodic, Aromatic, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Emmenagogue, Mucolytic, Nervine, Refrigerant, Sedative, Stomach Tonic, Tonic.

        Internal Uses: Amenorrhea, Anxiety, Bronchitis, Chickenpox, Colds, Diarrhea, Dysmenorrhea, Dyspepsia, Fever, Flatulence, Headache, Hives, Hyperactivity, Hysteria, Indigestion, Insomnia, Measles, Motion Sickness, Restlessness, Stomachache, Teething, Toothache

        Internal Applications: Tea, Tincture, Capsules.

        It is a mild antibacterial. Chew the fresh leaves for a headache or toothache. It helps stomachaches by calming the nerves. Use it for stress, nervousness. This is an excellent herb for children and will help calm them during the trials of teething, colic and restlessness. When given for colds and fevers, it helps the person get the rest that they need.

        Topical Uses: Allergies, Arthritis, Bloodshot Eyes, Bruises, Colic, Eye Inflammation, Hemorrhoids, Hiccups, Insect Bites, Insect Repellent, Pain, Rheumatism, Sprains, Stress, Teething, Toothache

        Topical Applications: Bath herb for stress, colic and teething. Compress or poultice for pain, sprains, bruises and insect bites. Toothache poultice. Hair rinse for scalp irritations. Liniment for arthritis and rheumatism. Eyewash for inflammation, allergies and bloodshot eyes. Enema to cleanse the colon. Salve for hemorrhoids. Leaves have been smoked as a euphoric and to stop hiccoughs. Catnip toys for cats - simply tie some of the dried herb into an old sock. The scent repels rats and many insects.

        Culinary uses: Young leaves can be made into pesto and sauces, and added to salads. Leaves are rubbed on meat, before cooking, as a flavoring. Before Chinese tea was popular in the West, Catnip was enjoyed as a common beverage.

        Energetics: Pungent, Bitter, Cool, Dry.

        Chemical Constituents: Essential oil (carvacrol, citronellal, geraniol, nepetol, nepetelactone, pulegone, thymol), iridoids, tannins.

        Contraindications: No toxicity although smoking the herb is mildly hallucinogenic.

        Comments: Named after the attraction that cats have for nipping this plant. It seems to affect them as an aphrodisiac and a euphoric. Its smell is similar to the pheromones that cats secrete. The genus name, Nepeta, is from Nepeti, a Roman town where this herb was cultivated. This is a good herb for people who don't like sharing, have a hard time revealing their feelings, and never complain. Early American settlers believed it would make kind people mean, and so the dried roots were fed to hangmen and executioners. It can be grown from seed in the garden, but if transplanted the neighborhood cats will devour it; hence the saying, 'If you set it, cats will eat it. If you sow it, cats won't know it'.
      • Carowyn Silveroak
        Greetings! My favorite drink in the winter when the sniffles come is Syrup of Lemons, which a shire friend gave to me one nasty cold shire demo when I was
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 1, 2009
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          Greetings!
           
          My favorite drink in the winter when the sniffles come is Syrup of Lemons, which a shire friend gave to me one nasty cold shire demo when I was feeling quite under the weather (shouldn't have been there in the first place, learned my lesson....keep my germs to myself, I do!)
           
           
          Enjoy!
           
          -Carowyn
           
           
           
          >Another reason is that some of my thoughts have turned to ancient
          options for hot drinks in the wintertime, that is besides alchohol (even though much of the wine was new wine with a low alcohol content).

          ____________________________________________________________
          Hotel
          Hotel pics, info and virtual tours. Click here to book a hotel online.

        • Dana Kramer-Rolls
          I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 17, 2010
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            I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo .  I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household.  That will  knock you out.  But it certainly works.

             

            Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches.  I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment.  And it grows like crazy.

             

            Sir Maythen

            Mists, West

             

            From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
            Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
            To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

             

             

            I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
            Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
            I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
            Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
            And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
            It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!

            -Kuromori Fumiyo 
             Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist



            --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:


            From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
            Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
            To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM

             

            Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

            Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
            Thanks,
            Jack

             

          • Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, ST
            My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 18, 2010
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              My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space where our tent is going cuts down on our "insect guests" inside the tent. Plus it makes the camp smell good for a bit!

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
              Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 17:35
              To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint



              I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.



              Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.



              Sir Maythen

              Mists, West



              From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
              Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
              To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint





              I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
              Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
              I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
              Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
              And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
              It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!



              -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
              Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist



              --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:


              From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
              Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
              To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM



              Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

              Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
              Thanks,
              Jack
            • Dana Kramer-Rolls
              A Care2 article stated that an Iowa State University research group showed that the essential oil found in the herb catnip is about 10 times more effective
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 19, 2010
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                A Care2 article stated that an Iowa State University research group showed that the essential oil found in the herb catnip is about 10 times more effective than DEET in repelling mosquitoes in the laboratory. DEET apparently also causes brain damage. Lavender also was mentioned in the article as a mosquito repellant. And citronella oil, which is kind of minty-lemony. So your strewing mixture sounds bang on.

                Sir Maythen

                -----Original Message-----
                From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, STE 2130-F6
                Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 3:32 AM
                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space where our tent is going cuts down on our "insect guests" inside the tent. Plus it makes the camp smell good for a bit!

                -----Original Message-----
                From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
                Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 17:35
                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint



                I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.



                Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.



                Sir Maythen

                Mists, West



                From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint





                I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!



                -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
                Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist



                --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:


                From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
                Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM



                Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

                Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                Thanks,
                Jack
              • Trey Capnerhurst
                But think of the side effects! It s much easier to swat the swarms of mosquitoes than all those cats. But at least you can see them better... Treasach ...
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 19, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  
                  But think of the side effects!
                   
                  It's much easier to swat the swarms of mosquitoes than all those cats.  But at least you can see them better...
                   
                  Treasach
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2010 7:00 PM
                  Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                   

                  A Care2 article stated that an Iowa State University research group showed that the essential oil found in the herb catnip is about 10 times more effective than DEET in repelling mosquitoes in the laboratory. DEET apparently also causes brain damage. Lavender also was mentioned in the article as a mosquito repellant. And citronella oil, which is kind of minty-lemony. So your strewing mixture sounds bang on.

                  Sir Maythen

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, STE 2130-F6
                  Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 3:32 AM
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                  My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space where our tent is going cuts down on our "insect guests" inside the tent. Plus it makes the camp smell good for a bit!

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
                  Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 17:35
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                  I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.

                  Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.

                  Sir Maythen

                  Mists, West

                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                  Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                  I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                  Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                  I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                  Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                  And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                  It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!

                  -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
                  Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist

                  --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:

                  From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
                  Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM

                  Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

                  Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                  Thanks,
                  Jack

                • Dana Kramer-Rolls
                  My dear, I am surrounded by clouds of cats, and as for seeing them, they do have a way of materializing underfoot. Sir Maythen, Cat Whisperer From:
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 20, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment

                    My dear, I am surrounded by clouds of cats, and as for seeing them, they do have a way of materializing underfoot.

                     

                    Sir Maythen, Cat Whisperer

                     

                    From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Trey Capnerhurst
                    Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2010 7:55 PM
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                     

                     

                    

                    But think of the side effects!

                     

                    It's much easier to swat the swarms of mosquitoes than all those cats.  But at least you can see them better...

                     

                    Treasach

                     

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2010 7:00 PM

                    Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                     

                     

                    A Care2 article stated that an Iowa State University research group showed that the essential oil found in the herb catnip is about 10 times more effective than DEET in repelling mosquitoes in the laboratory. DEET apparently also causes brain damage. Lavender also was mentioned in the article as a mosquito repellant. And citronella oil, which is kind of minty-lemony. So your strewing mixture sounds bang on.

                    Sir Maythen

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, STE 2130-F6
                    Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 3:32 AM
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                    My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space where our tent is going cuts down on our "insect guests" inside the tent. Plus it makes the camp smell good for a bit!

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
                    Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 17:35
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                    I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.

                    Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.

                    Sir Maythen

                    Mists, West

                    From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                    Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                    I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                    Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                    I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                    Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                    And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                    It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!

                    -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
                    Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist

                    --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:

                    From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
                    Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM

                    Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

                    Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                    Thanks,
                    Jack

                  • Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, ST
                    And my cats eat bugs.... ... From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls Sent: Sunday, June 20,
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 21, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      And my cats eat bugs....

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
                      Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2010 3:42
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint



                      My dear, I am surrounded by clouds of cats, and as for seeing them, they do have a way of materializing underfoot.



                      Sir Maythen, Cat Whisperer



                      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Trey Capnerhurst
                      Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2010 7:55 PM
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint





                      

                      But think of the side effects!



                      It's much easier to swat the swarms of mosquitoes than all those cats. But at least you can see them better...



                      Treasach



                      ----- Original Message -----

                      From: Dana Kramer-Rolls <mailto:danadkr@...>

                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com>

                      Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2010 7:00 PM

                      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint





                      A Care2 article stated that an Iowa State University research group showed that the essential oil found in the herb catnip is about 10 times more effective than DEET in repelling mosquitoes in the laboratory. DEET apparently also causes brain damage. Lavender also was mentioned in the article as a mosquito repellant. And citronella oil, which is kind of minty-lemony. So your strewing mixture sounds bang on.

                      Sir Maythen

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Foster, Laurie E. USNCIV NAVAIR 2185, STE 2130-F6
                      Sent: Friday, June 18, 2010 3:32 AM
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                      My favorite use of catnip is as a part of my strewing mixture that I use at Pennsic. Catnip, lavender and lemon balm dried, crushed and spread in the space where our tent is going cuts down on our "insect guests" inside the tent. Plus it makes the camp smell good for a bit!

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Dana Kramer-Rolls
                      Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2010 17:35
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                      I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.

                      Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.

                      Sir Maythen

                      Mists, West

                      From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                      Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint

                      I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                      Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                      I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                      Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                      And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                      It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!

                      -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif> >
                      Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist

                      --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@... <mailto:original_xman%40hotmail.com> > wrote:

                      From: storm85213 <original_xman@... <mailto:original_xman%40hotmail.com> >
                      Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SCA-Herbalist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM

                      Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.

                      Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                      Thanks,
                      Jack
                    • perriscott
                      My two pence on Feverfew: YES! It works well (for me). More than a bit bitter if you use the liquid form... capsules work equally well. I use it for sinus
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 24, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        My two pence on Feverfew:
                        YES! It works well (for me). More than a bit bitter if you use the liquid form... capsules work equally well. I use it for sinus "migraine". Also good for "hay fever".

                        Elspeth McArran


                        --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Dana Kramer-Rolls" <danadkr@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Sir Maythen
                        >
                        > Mists, West
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                        > Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                        > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                        > Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                        > I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                        > Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                        > And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                        > It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
                        > Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
                        > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                        > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.
                        >
                        > Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                        > Thanks,
                        > Jack
                        >
                      • beginxs
                        my feverfew grows like crazy!! steep like for tea, soak clothes for face pack! sigh - wonderful plant      ... ________________________________ From:
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 24, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          my feverfew grows like crazy!! steep like for tea, soak clothes for face pack!
                          sigh - wonderful plant
                           

                           

                           
                          Yerushah             mka: Jerusha

                          www.pamperedchef.biz/jewgann




                          From: perriscott <DamePosintella@...>
                          To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thu, June 24, 2010 10:35:16 AM
                          Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: catnip/catmint

                           

                          My two pence on Feverfew:
                          YES! It works well (for me). More than a bit bitter if you use the liquid form... capsules work equally well. I use it for sinus "migraine". Also good for "hay fever".

                          Elspeth McArran

                          --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Dana Kramer-Rolls" <danadkr@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I fully concur with Kuromori Fumiyo . I used to make a tea of catnip, skullcap, valerian, and white willow bark for postwar fighting aches and pains for the Hoghton household. That will knock you out. But it certainly works.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Have you had any results for feverfew for headaches. I know that in the UK that is a standard treatment. And it grows like crazy.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Sir Maythen
                          >
                          > Mists, West
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mindslashed
                          > Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:36 PM
                          > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > I'll be honest that I don't know about period uses for catnip; but modernly catnip is used as a gentle pain reliever, relaxer, and is good for calming nerves.
                          > Its gentle enough to give to children, and one of the ingredients in my own personal anti-migrate tea blend.
                          > I suggest taking it with lemon balm and or chamomile as a soothing relaxer tea.
                          > Mix it with peppermint to calm an upset stomach.
                          > And combine it with stronger pain relievers like skullcap or arnica for long term issues, add ginger to that mix if there is chronic inflammation.
                          > It's also good for aromatherapy for relaxation, a hot catnip and chamomile bath is the best thing after a hard day!
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > -Kuromori Fumiyo <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
                          > Shire of Dragon's Mist, Antir. Master Herbalist
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- On Sun, 11/29/09, storm85213 <original_xman@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > From: storm85213 <original_xman@...>
                          > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] catnip/catmint
                          > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          > Date: Sunday, November 29, 2009, 12:44 PM
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Happy (post)Thanksgiving. I hope that someone can verify/illuminate me on catnip. There was a brief article in the paper yesterday about the nature and uses of catnip beyond altering the states of cats. The article said that anise extract has the same effect on dogs, but that is another topic. One of the uses was as a cockroach repellent. Also stated was that catnip tea was a popular European tea before the importation of Chinese teas. I did a quick web search which did support the cockroach repellent, and that catnip was widespread throughout Europe and North Africa.
                          >
                          > Does anybody know of any other uses, or the earliest suspected uses in Europe?
                          > Thanks,
                          > Jack
                          >


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