Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Honey laced with lavendar

Expand Messages
  • audreytaylor13
    I have heard that the ancients used honey steeped with lavendar on any open wound. I can t remember where I read this, perhaps something form Ancient Egypt.
    Message 1 of 9 , May 9, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I have heard that the ancients used honey steeped with lavendar on any open wound. I can't remember where I read this, perhaps something form Ancient Egypt. It's been quite a few years ago. Honey has a natural anodyne and is antiseptic, and lavendar is antispetic as well. Anyone else ever read or heard of such a thing? I believe the ancient belief was that you fed the wound. Modernistically I know that honey feeds the good bacteria that eats the staph or the strep bacteria, and prevents wounds from festering. But, of course, they didn't know about such things then.
    • audreytaylor13
      I have heard that the ancients used honey steeped with lavendar on any open wound. I can t remember where I read this, perhaps something form Ancient Egypt.
      Message 2 of 9 , May 9, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        I have heard that the ancients used honey steeped with lavendar on any open wound. I can't remember where I read this, perhaps something form Ancient Egypt. It's been quite a few years ago. Honey has a natural anodyne and is antiseptic, and lavendar is antispetic as well. Anyone else ever read or heard of such a thing? I believe the ancient belief was that you fed the wound. Modernistically I know that honey feeds the good bacteria that eats the staph or the strep bacteria, and prevents wounds from festering. But, of course, they didn't know about such things then.
      • jack hollandbeck
        Good morning. The ancients used honey for all kinds of things, including eating. lol It was the only sweetener at the time. Anyway honey was considered the
        Message 3 of 9 , May 10, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Good morning. The ancients used honey for all kinds of things, including eating. lol It was the only sweetener at the time. Anyway honey was considered the perfect food (land of milk and honey, honey and ambrosia, etc.) since it could be eaten raw without any preparation, and never spoiled. Hence it was perfect and a gift from gods. By extension honey bees were also sacred and not to be harmed. Honey, being thick, could be spread on a wound and stay in place, kept the bandage from sticking to the wound, and killed bacteria preventing infection at that spot. As a divine gift, and the non-Christian ancients believed that this world was part of the body of the divine (the universal divine of which gods, spirits, plants, etc were extensions of or actual aspects of that divine) so the use of honey was also religious magic. The Egyptians would coat mummy bandages in honey, along with other stuff. The religious magic in this case used the undying properties (since honey does not spoil it was also considered an agent of immortality) to help insure and preserve the immortal soul and body of the dead. Honey had it's practical uses as food, bactericide and preservative; and it's magico-religious uses as a spiritual preservative and a direct contact with the substance of the divine. Whew! The only other wholly natural stuff that comes close to honey are running water and salt for natural purity and divine association. That is a short primer. Locally made honey also has the added benefit of containing locals pollens. That means that when you eat local honey you are getting small doses of allergens that you may react to, erego eating local honey helps to mitigate allergies. Hope this helps, and you are on the right track.
          Jack


          > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
          > From: AudreyTaylor13@...
          > Date: Sat, 9 May 2009 17:45:40 +0000
          > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Honey laced with lavendar
          >
          > I have heard that the ancients used honey steeped with lavendar on any open wound. I can't remember where I read this, perhaps something form Ancient Egypt. It's been quite a few years ago. Honey has a natural anodyne and is antiseptic, and lavendar is antispetic as well. Anyone else ever read or heard of such a thing? I believe the ancient belief was that you fed the wound. Modernistically I know that honey feeds the good bacteria that eats the staph or the strep bacteria, and prevents wounds from festering. But, of course, they didn't know about such things then.
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > -------------------------------------------------------------
          > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
          > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
          > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
          >
          > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
          > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
          > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/
          >
          > <*> Your email settings:
          > Individual Email | Traditional
          >
          > <*> To change settings online go to:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Herbalist/join
          > (Yahoo! ID required)
          >
          > <*> To change settings via email:
          > mailto:SCA-Herbalist-digest@yahoogroups.com
          > mailto:SCA-Herbalist-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
          > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >


          HotmailĀ® has a new way to see what's up with your friends. Check it out.
        • Richenda du Jardin
          This may have been said in another post that I missed: Honey -- pasteurized or not -- should never be fed to an child under a year old. Their digestive systems
          Message 4 of 9 , May 10, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            This may have been said in another post that I missed: Honey --
            pasteurized or not -- should never be fed to an child under a year old.
            Their digestive systems are not mature enough to destroy the Clostridium
            botulinum spores (which go dormant during cooking and pasteurization).
            As a result, the infant may suffer from infant botulism, which can be
            fatal. Symptoms of infant botulism are constipation, drooling,
            crankiness, diminished feeding. For more information, please see any of
            the following web sites:

            http://www.drgreene.com/21_1037.html
            http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020401/1388.html
            http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/botulism.html

            My neurologist talked to me about this before I started getting botox
            for my dystonia (botox doesn't put children at risk, he just wanted to
            know what I had found out before he did it).

            Richenda
          • donat0
            As a meadmaker, my trademark is Lavender in my mead, and is it GOOD... especially in a hottub with someone you care about.......... Donat0
            Message 5 of 9 , May 11, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              As a meadmaker, my trademark is Lavender in my mead, and is it GOOD... especially in a hottub with someone you care about..........

              Donat0
            • donat0
              I guess I might as well make a meaningful contribution about this... Honey isn t as such a natural antiseptic. As Richenda points out, you can get botulism
              Message 6 of 9 , May 11, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                I guess I might as well make a meaningful contribution about this...

                Honey isn't as such a natural antiseptic. As Richenda points out, you can get botulism from it... along with myriad other pathogens that are found in it.

                Honey by its nature... little bits of stuff picked up from THOUSANDS of places, placed in a cell and almost all of the liquid evaporated until its thick.... has a complexity beyond belief including every pathogen in the book. What makes it "antiseptic" you may ask?

                Its concentration of sugar makes it so nothing can grow in it. Its also very hydrophyllic. It absorbs water like wild, and I am sure when one puts it on a wound, it absorbs all the moisture the body puts out. I need not get descriptive here, I am sure, but you understand how this would keep a wound very dry yet "moist".
                This would be especially useful on extreme burns that produce much pus.

                Just don't dilute the honey, and it will be useful. If you thin it out, you will release whatever those little honey bee's sat in, and some of that you probably don't want on a wound.

                Donat0

                PS, I don't know what healing properties Lavender has, but I know its used as a relaxant (which is why I love putting it in my meads), but if you mix it in honey, any moisture in it will get sucked into the hydrophyllic honey and become useless. Better to make a lavender tea for the wounded person and put the honey on straight.


                --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Richenda du Jardin <richenda.du.jardin@...> wrote:
                >
                > This may have been said in another post that I missed: Honey --
                > pasteurized or not -- should never be fed to an child under a year old.
                > Their digestive systems are not mature enough to destroy the Clostridium
                > botulinum spores (which go dormant during cooking and pasteurization).
                > As a result, the infant may suffer from infant botulism, which can be
                > fatal. Symptoms of infant botulism are constipation, drooling,
                > crankiness, diminished feeding. For more information, please see any of
                > the following web sites:
                >
                > http://www.drgreene.com/21_1037.html
                > http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020401/1388.html
                > http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/botulism.html
                >
                > My neurologist talked to me about this before I started getting botox
                > for my dystonia (botox doesn't put children at risk, he just wanted to
                > know what I had found out before he did it).
                >
                > Richenda
                >
              • audreytaylor13
                Message 7 of 9 , May 14, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "donat0" <donat0@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I guess I might as well make a meaningful contribution about this...
                  >
                  > Honey isn't as such a natural antiseptic. As Richenda points out, you can get botulism from it... along with myriad other pathogens that are found in it.
                  >
                  > Honey by its nature... little bits of stuff picked up from THOUSANDS of places, placed in a cell and almost all of the liquid evaporated until its thick.... has a complexity beyond belief including every pathogen in the book. What makes it "antiseptic" you may ask?
                  >
                  > Its concentration of sugar makes it so nothing can grow in it. Its also very hydrophyllic. It absorbs water like wild, and I am sure when one puts it on a wound, it absorbs all the moisture the body puts out. I need not get descriptive here, I am sure, but you understand how this would keep a wound very dry yet "moist".
                  > This would be especially useful on extreme burns that produce much pus.
                  >
                  > Just don't dilute the honey, and it will be useful. If you thin it out, you will release whatever those little honey bee's sat in, and some of that you probably don't want on a wound.
                  >
                  > Donat0
                  >
                  > PS, I don't know what healing properties Lavender has, but I know its used as a relaxant (which is why I love putting it in my meads), but if you mix it in honey, any moisture in it will get sucked into the hydrophyllic honey and become useless. Better to make a lavender tea for the wounded person and put the honey on straight.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Richenda du Jardin <richenda.du.jardin@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > This may have been said in another post that I missed: Honey --
                  > > pasteurized or not -- should never be fed to an child under a year old.
                  > > Their digestive systems are not mature enough to destroy the Clostridium
                  > > botulinum spores (which go dormant during cooking and pasteurization).
                  > > As a result, the infant may suffer from infant botulism, which can be
                  > > fatal. Symptoms of infant botulism are constipation, drooling,
                  > > crankiness, diminished feeding. For more information, please see any of
                  > > the following web sites:
                  > >
                  > > http://www.drgreene.com/21_1037.html
                  > > http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020401/1388.html
                  > > http://kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/botulism.html
                  > >
                  > > My neurologist talked to me about this before I started getting botox
                  > > for my dystonia (botox doesn't put children at risk, he just wanted to
                  > > know what I had found out before he did it).
                  > >
                  > > Richenda
                  > >
                  >When you steep lavendar in honey you are leaching the oils from the lavendar into the honey. I'm not sure about dissolving the oils, since honey isn't an oil, but it would work the same as with water since honey is water based. So you are making a sort of thick tea with a plethora of other constituents in it. The lavendar would still work the same as if it were water or oil based. I would think anyway. Comments?
                • Jennifer Heise
                  ... I would think this would be correct, or at least similar to flavoring a syrup with the lavender. Culpeper, who is postperiod but near to it, gives
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 14, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >>When you steep lavendar in honey you are leaching the oils from the
                    >> lavendar into the honey. I'm not sure about dissolving the oils, since honey
                    >> isn't an oil, but it would work the same as with water since honey is water
                    >> based. So you are making a sort of thick tea with a plethora of other
                    >> constituents in it. The lavendar would still work the same as if it were
                    >> water or oil based. I would think anyway. Comments?

                    I would think this would be correct, or at least similar to flavoring
                    a syrup with the lavender. Culpeper, who is postperiod but near to
                    it, gives suggestions for making lohochs and electuaries with honey,
                    though the botanicals are not strained out.

                    Note that 'lavender honey' might not be honey with lavender steeped in
                    it, but honey made by bees that had fed exclusively or extensively on
                    lavender (like buckwheat or thyme or orange honey).

                    Can someone tell me where the reference to lavender honey or honey
                    laced with lavender is documented? I seem to have missed it in the
                    conversation and I'd like to look into it further.

                    -- Jadwiga
                  • donat0
                    I am not an expert, but as I see it in the application being dsicussed; as a salve on a wound, I don t see how having the oils leached into the honey would
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 15, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I am not an expert, but as I see it in the application being dsicussed; as a salve on a wound, I don't see how having the oils leached into the honey would help. As I said, the honey's main property that would apply here would be to literally suck the fluids away from the wound, while maintainting a moist environment. This would hold all the "Yech" stuff in a suspension away from the wound. Anything leached from the lavender would also be held in suspension away from the wound.. making it rather useless.

                      It would be more useful to make a paste from the lavender, put it on the wound, and then cover THAT with the honey.... no, that would create an unsterile environment. I would suggest making lavender tea to calm the poor victim down while experimenting with unproven medical treatments on them. A sedative goes a long way to fast healing.


                      > >When you steep lavendar in honey you are leaching the oils from the lavendar into the honey. I'm not sure about dissolving the oils, since honey isn't an oil, but it would work the same as with water since honey is water based. So you are making a sort of thick tea with a plethora of other constituents in it. The lavendar would still work the same as if it were water or oil based. I would think anyway. Comments?
                      >
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.