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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

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  • Apollonia de Avena
    I don t recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a healing cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
      I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
      Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
       
      I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
       
       
      Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
       
      Apollonia


      --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...> wrote:

      From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...>
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

      All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
       
      When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
       
      For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
       
      The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
       
      Treasach
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


      Shea butter
      Cocoa butter
      Vitamin E
       
      All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
      You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
       
      Apollonia
    • ileana boyd
      Grape seed oil can be found in Krogers with the olive oils. I love it and use it with my other oils as my base. Okay, so now here is my question: my long
      Message 2 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
        Grape seed oil can be found in Krogers with the olive oils.  I love it and use it with my other oils as my base.
        Okay, so now here is my question: my long haired teenage son has lice, tea tree oil seems to kill the critters, what is a quick way to get the nits off the hair, they are the exact same color as his hair and I have trouble seeing them to pull them out, so he keeps getting the critters. It is less and less, but still there.
        I really do not want to scalp his hair just yet...
        Thanks
        Ileana

         
        ""Not all sweetness, not all light, some that bark will also bite. Magick that is taken has quite a price, if not given freely you will meet some Fae that aren't too nice." Shadows, Gateway to Faerie, ElvenDrums"

        In short: Watch out for the red-headed ones! :-)



        From: Apollonia de Avena <apollonia_de_avena@...>
        To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:34:22 AM
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

        I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
        Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
         
        I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
         
         
        Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
         
        Apollonia


        --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

        From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
        To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

        All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
         
        When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
         
        For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
         
        The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
         
        Treasach
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
        Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


        Shea butter
        Cocoa butter
        Vitamin E
         
        All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
        You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
         
        Apollonia


      • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
        Sorry. Let me draw the lines. I was assuming that she didn t have Vit. E in caps just sitting around to cut open, otherwise she probably would have thought of
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
          Sorry.  Let me draw the lines.
           
          I was assuming that she didn't have Vit. E in caps just sitting around to cut open, otherwise she probably would have thought of that herself, so she would have to go out to purchase Vit. E specifically for the purpose, and I was just trying to be helpful in suggesting a more economical alternative.  I was also assuming that the skin on her finger was the same as on her breast, so that if she was having a reaction to the lanolin on her finger, it might not be the most effective thing to heal her nipple condition.  I was assuming she had a nipple condition that needed healing because she was putting lanolin on it.  I'm currently breastfeeding and not slathering my nipples with anything, other than an after dinner aperitif for my baby's dining pleasure, because my nipples are not bleeding, cracked, or sore. They were with my first baby, and a cream or salve that I could get my hands on, that didn't cost a bundle, that I knew what when in it, and, before the days of the Internet, was readily available, would have been a godsend.  So I shared an effective formula.
           
          Next time I will lay out my entire reasoning in my post, rather than simply giving the advice.  I wouldn't want anyone to get lost if my assumptions aren't spelled out...
           
          Treasach
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:34 AM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

          I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
          Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
           
          I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
           
           
          Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
           
          Apollonia


          --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

          From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
          To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

          All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
           
          When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
           
          For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
           
          The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
           
          Treasach
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


          Shea butter
          Cocoa butter
          Vitamin E
           
          All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
          You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
           
          Apollonia

        • Apollonia de Avena
          No need to get worked up... I whole-heartily agree with your formulas, and it was a great suggestion.  In my response, I was justifying my post about using
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
            No need to get worked up...
            I whole-heartily agree with your formulas, and it was a great suggestion. 
            In my response, I was justifying my post about using just plain shea, cocoa, or vit E (which I felt you discounted in your post), and pointing out what the OP was asking in the first place. 
            Emails are always the worst for expressing oneself, but thank you for your clarification. 
            If it is any consolation, I did understand what your assumptions and reasonings were, but I felt I needed to clarify my original response.
             
            Apollonia

            --- On Mon, 3/16/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...> wrote:

            From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...>
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
            To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, March 16, 2009, 8:17 AM

            Sorry.  Let me draw the lines.
             
            I was assuming that she didn't have Vit. E in caps just sitting around to cut open, otherwise she probably would have thought of that herself, so she would have to go out to purchase Vit. E specifically for the purpose, and I was just trying to be helpful in suggesting a more economical alternative.  I was also assuming that the skin on her finger was the same as on her breast, so that if she was having a reaction to the lanolin on her finger, it might not be the most effective thing to heal her nipple condition.  I was assuming she had a nipple condition that needed healing because she was putting lanolin on it.  I'm currently breastfeeding and not slathering my nipples with anything, other than an after dinner aperitif for my baby's dining pleasure, because my nipples are not bleeding, cracked, or sore. They were with my first baby, and a cream or salve that I could get my hands on, that didn't cost a bundle, that I knew what when in it, and, before the days of the Internet, was readily available, would have been a godsend.  So I shared an effective formula.
             
            Next time I will lay out my entire reasoning in my post, rather than simply giving the advice.  I wouldn't want anyone to get lost if my assumptions aren't spelled out...
             
            Treasach
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:34 AM
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

            I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
            Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
             
            I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
             
             
            Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
             
            Apollonia


            --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

            From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
            To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

            All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
             
            When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
             
            For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
             
            The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
             
            Treasach
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


            Shea butter
            Cocoa butter
            Vitamin E
             
            All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
            You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
             
            Apollonia
          • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
            Pish tosh. Gives me a chance to practice my righteously indignant but reasonable sounding bitch style. I m no Stephen Colbert yet, but I get by... Trey ...
            Message 5 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
              Pish tosh.  Gives me a chance to practice my "righteously indignant but reasonable sounding bitch" style.  I'm no Stephen Colbert yet, but I get by...
               
              Trey
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 8:39 AM
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

              No need to get worked up...
              I whole-heartily agree with your formulas, and it was a great suggestion. 
              In my response, I was justifying my post about using just plain shea, cocoa, or vit E (which I felt you discounted in your post), and pointing out what the OP was asking in the first place. 
              Emails are always the worst for expressing oneself, but thank you for your clarification. 
              If it is any consolation, I did understand what your assumptions and reasonings were, but I felt I needed to clarify my original response.
               
              Apollonia

              --- On Mon, 3/16/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

              From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
              To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Monday, March 16, 2009, 8:17 AM

              Sorry.  Let me draw the lines.
               
              I was assuming that she didn't have Vit. E in caps just sitting around to cut open, otherwise she probably would have thought of that herself, so she would have to go out to purchase Vit. E specifically for the purpose, and I was just trying to be helpful in suggesting a more economical alternative.  I was also assuming that the skin on her finger was the same as on her breast, so that if she was having a reaction to the lanolin on her finger, it might not be the most effective thing to heal her nipple condition.  I was assuming she had a nipple condition that needed healing because she was putting lanolin on it.  I'm currently breastfeeding and not slathering my nipples with anything, other than an after dinner aperitif for my baby's dining pleasure, because my nipples are not bleeding, cracked, or sore. They were with my first baby, and a cream or salve that I could get my hands on, that didn't cost a bundle, that I knew what when in it, and, before the days of the Internet, was readily available, would have been a godsend.  So I shared an effective formula.
               
              Next time I will lay out my entire reasoning in my post, rather than simply giving the advice.  I wouldn't want anyone to get lost if my assumptions aren't spelled out...
               
              Treasach
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:34 AM
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

              I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
              Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
               
              I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
               
               
              Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
               
              Apollonia


              --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

              From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
              To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

              All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
               
              When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
               
              For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
               
              The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
               
              Treasach
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


              Shea butter
              Cocoa butter
              Vitamin E
               
              All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
              You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
               
              Apollonia

            • Dianaim
              Hi Everyone, Thank you so much for the info. My nipples seem to be fine with the Lanolin product. I have had no reaction there. It seems that my hands/fingers
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
                Hi Everyone,

                Thank you so much for the info. 

                My nipples seem to be fine with the Lanolin product.  I have had no reaction there.

                It seems that my hands/fingers that are applying the product seem to be doing poorly.  I have been using vitamin E and wearing gloves to bed after applying to keep the vitamin E moisturizing for a couple of hours before the next feeding.  It just doesn't seem to be helping the fingers..It's great for the rest of the hands though. :)  I have even resorted to filing down the rough skin on the finger and thumb pad to let the vitamin E work better. 

                Dianaim

                On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 10:17 AM, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...> wrote:

                Sorry.  Let me draw the lines.
                 
                I was assuming that she didn't have Vit. E in caps just sitting around to cut open, otherwise she probably would have thought of that herself, so she would have to go out to purchase Vit. E specifically for the purpose, and I was just trying to be helpful in suggesting a more economical alternative.  I was also assuming that the skin on her finger was the same as on her breast, so that if she was having a reaction to the lanolin on her finger, it might not be the most effective thing to heal her nipple condition.  I was assuming she had a nipple condition that needed healing because she was putting lanolin on it.  I'm currently breastfeeding and not slathering my nipples with anything, other than an after dinner aperitif for my baby's dining pleasure, because my nipples are not bleeding, cracked, or sore. They were with my first baby, and a cream or salve that I could get my hands on, that didn't cost a bundle, that I knew what when in it, and, before the days of the Internet, was readily available, would have been a godsend.  So I shared an effective formula.
                 
                Next time I will lay out my entire reasoning in my post, rather than simply giving the advice.  I wouldn't want anyone to get lost if my assumptions aren't spelled out...
                 
                Treasach
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 1:34 AM
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
                Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
                 
                I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
                 
                 
                Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
                 
                Apollonia


                --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...> wrote:

                From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...>
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

                All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
                 
                When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
                 
                For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
                 
                The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
                 
                Treasach
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


                Shea butter
                Cocoa butter
                Vitamin E
                 
                All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
                You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
                 
                Apollonia

              • Jennifer Heise
                I have tried Lansinoh but Annys Wolf gave me some cocoa butter to use on my nipples while I m breastfeeding, and it seems to work well on my hands also. --
                Message 7 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
                  I have tried Lansinoh but Annys Wolf gave me some cocoa butter to use
                  on my nipples while I'm breastfeeding, and it seems to work well on my
                  hands also.
                  -- Jadwiga

                  On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 12:39 AM, Dianaim <tempestviolet@...> wrote:
                  > Hi Folks,
                  >
                  > Got a question.  Just had my first child and have been using Lansinoh
                  > (lanolin ointment) for breast feeding.
                  >
                  > My query is, I thought that lanolin was supposed to have moisturizer
                  > qualities.
                  >
                  > I have been finding that my hands have been drying out from washing the
                  > bottles used for supplemental feedings, especially the index fingers and
                  > thumbs which are used to apply the Lasinoh on the breast.
                  >
                  > Shouldn't the lanolin be keeping the index fingers and thumbs moist?  They
                  > have been drying out so bad that they are rough and just beginning to get
                  > painful.
                  >
                  > Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
                  >
                  > Dianaim
                  >
                  >
                • HopeAllyson Dwiggins
                  As it was unlabeled, I can understand the confusion. It is coconut oil. Coconut oil is solid at room temp, easily melted between two fingers, and fantastic
                  Message 8 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
                    As it was unlabeled, I can understand the confusion. It is coconut oil.

                    Coconut oil is solid at room temp, easily melted between two fingers,
                    and fantastic for skin healing. I use it instead of lanolin because the
                    lanolin sometimes makes latching on harder with the slipperiness of the
                    nipple and areola after use.

                    It is safe for the baby. If you have any questions about this. please
                    ask me.

                    /getting on soapbox
                    I have watched this thread with interest and concern. Please make sure
                    what you are putting on your nipples is safe. As a Board Certified
                    Lactation Consultant mundanely, I can tell you not everything
                    recommended for nipples while breastfeeding is safe.
                    getting off soapbox/

                    Please don't flame me too harshly. My concern is for the moms and babies.
                    Annys


                    Jennifer Heise wrote:
                    >
                    > I have tried Lansinoh but Annys Wolf gave me some cocoa butter to use
                    > on my nipples while I'm breastfeeding, and it seems to work well on my
                    > hands also.
                    > -- Jadwiga
                    >
                    > On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 12:39 AM, Dianaim <tempestviolet@...
                    > <mailto:tempestviolet%40gmail.com>> wrote:
                    > > Hi Folks,
                    > >
                    > > Got a question. Just had my first child and have been using Lansinoh
                    > > (lanolin ointment) for breast feeding.
                    > >
                    > > My query is, I thought that lanolin was supposed to have moisturizer
                    > > qualities.
                    > >
                    > > I have been finding that my hands have been drying out from washing the
                    > > bottles used for supplemental feedings, especially the index fingers and
                    > > thumbs which are used to apply the Lasinoh on the breast.
                    > >
                    > > Shouldn't the lanolin be keeping the index fingers and thumbs
                    > moist? They
                    > > have been drying out so bad that they are rough and just beginning
                    > to get
                    > > painful.
                    > >
                    > > Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
                    > >
                    > > Dianaim
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                  • HopeAllyson Dwiggins
                    Let me restart that so it makes sense. I gave Jadwiga coconut oil, not cocoa butter. I think the rest is okay :) Annys
                    Message 9 of 24 , Mar 16, 2009
                      Let me restart that so it makes sense. I gave Jadwiga coconut oil, not
                      cocoa butter.
                      I think the rest is okay :)

                      Annys

                      HopeAllyson Dwiggins wrote:
                      >
                      > As it was unlabeled, I can understand the confusion. It is coconut oil.
                      >
                      > Coconut oil is solid at room temp, easily melted between two fingers,
                      > and fantastic for skin healing. I use it instead of lanolin because the
                      > lanolin sometimes makes latching on harder with the slipperiness of the
                      > nipple and areola after use.
                      >
                      > It is safe for the baby. If you have any questions about this. please
                      > ask me.
                      >
                      > /getting on soapbox
                      > I have watched this thread with interest and concern. Please make sure
                      > what you are putting on your nipples is safe. As a Board Certified
                      > Lactation Consultant mundanely, I can tell you not everything
                      > recommended for nipples while breastfeeding is safe.
                      > getting off soapbox/
                      >
                      > Please don't flame me too harshly. My concern is for the moms and babies.
                      > Annys
                      >
                      > Jennifer Heise wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I have tried Lansinoh but Annys Wolf gave me some cocoa butter to use
                      > > on my nipples while I'm breastfeeding, and it seems to work well on my
                      > > hands also.
                      > > -- Jadwiga
                      > >
                      > > On Sun, Mar 15, 2009 at 12:39 AM, Dianaim <tempestviolet@...
                      > <mailto:tempestviolet%40gmail.com>
                      > > <mailto:tempestviolet%40gmail.com>> wrote:
                      > > > Hi Folks,
                      > > >
                      > > > Got a question. Just had my first child and have been using Lansinoh
                      > > > (lanolin ointment) for breast feeding.
                      > > >
                      > > > My query is, I thought that lanolin was supposed to have moisturizer
                      > > > qualities.
                      > > >
                      > > > I have been finding that my hands have been drying out from
                      > washing the
                      > > > bottles used for supplemental feedings, especially the index
                      > fingers and
                      > > > thumbs which are used to apply the Lasinoh on the breast.
                      > > >
                      > > > Shouldn't the lanolin be keeping the index fingers and thumbs
                      > > moist? They
                      > > > have been drying out so bad that they are rough and just beginning
                      > > to get
                      > > > painful.
                      > > >
                      > > > Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
                      > > >
                      > > > Dianaim
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                    • Jennifer Heise
                      On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 5:59 PM, HopeAllyson Dwiggins ... Thanks for the correction, Annys. Obviously in my brain-compromised state, I forgot which it was!
                      Message 10 of 24 , Mar 18, 2009
                        On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 5:59 PM, HopeAllyson Dwiggins
                        <annyswolf@...> wrote:
                        > Let me restart that so it makes sense. I gave Jadwiga coconut oil, not
                        > cocoa butter.
                        > I think the rest is okay :)
                        >
                        > Annys
                        >
                        Thanks for the correction, Annys. Obviously in my brain-compromised
                        state, I forgot which it was!
                      • Christina
                        I remember my Mother running a fine tooth comb threw my hair when I was little and had them. Hurt like hell but got them out. ... -- NOT ALL WHO WANDER ARE
                        Message 11 of 24 , Mar 19, 2009
                          I remember my Mother running a fine tooth comb threw my hair when I was little and had them.  Hurt like hell but got them out.

                          On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 3:50 AM, ileana boyd <ileana_boyd@...> wrote:

                          Grape seed oil can be found in Krogers with the olive oils.  I love it and use it with my other oils as my base.
                          Okay, so now here is my question: my long haired teenage son has lice, tea tree oil seems to kill the critters, what is a quick way to get the nits off the hair, they are the exact same color as his hair and I have trouble seeing them to pull them out, so he keeps getting the critters. It is less and less, but still there.
                          I really do not want to scalp his hair just yet...
                          Thanks
                          Ileana

                           
                          ""Not all sweetness, not all light, some that bark will also bite. Magick that is taken has quite a price, if not given freely you will meet some Fae that aren't too nice." Shadows, Gateway to Faerie, ElvenDrums"

                          In short: Watch out for the red-headed ones! :-)



                          From: Apollonia de Avena <apollonia_de_avena@...>
                          To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:34:22 AM
                          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                          I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
                          Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
                           
                          I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
                           
                           
                          Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
                           
                          Apollonia


                          --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

                          From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
                          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
                          To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

                          All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
                           
                          When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
                           
                          For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
                           
                          The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
                           
                          Treasach
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
                          Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


                          Shea butter
                          Cocoa butter
                          Vitamin E
                           
                          All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
                          You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
                           
                          Apollonia




                          --
                          NOT ALL WHO WANDER ARE LOST.
                        • Lila Richards
                          ... You can buy nit combs - not sure where, in the US (I m in New Zealand), but your equivalent to a pharmacy should have them, or perhaps a supermarket. There
                          Message 12 of 24 , Mar 19, 2009
                            ileana boyd wrote:
                            > Okay, so now here is my question: my long haired teenage son has lice, tea tree oil seems to kill the critters, what is a quick way to get the nits off the hair, they are the exact same color as his hair and I have trouble seeing them to pull them out, so he keeps getting the critters.

                            You can buy nit combs - not sure where, in the US (I'm in New Zealand), but your equivalent to a pharmacy should have them, or perhaps a supermarket. There are also elecronic combs that are supposed to zap them but I've never actually seen one or heard how they work. You could also try what I've seen recommended for cats - use a comb and kep dipping it in a container of water and disinfectant. Apparently the disinfectant kills them.

                            Good luck!

                            Sinech.


                            * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
                            An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
                          • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
                            I use a nit comb every day , of course, and don t forget that Diatomaceous earth will kill the adults and the eggs, and it can be dusted into the hair,
                            Message 13 of 24 , Mar 19, 2009
                              I use a nit comb every day , of course, and don't forget that Diatomaceous earth will kill the adults and the eggs, and it can be dusted into the hair, bedclothes, and other places the 'lil kritters might hide.  And all the laundry loads should have Borax in them.  That should just about do it.
                               
                               
                              Treasach
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 4:50 AM
                              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                              Grape seed oil can be found in Krogers with the olive oils.  I love it and use it with my other oils as my base.
                              Okay, so now here is my question: my long haired teenage son has lice, tea tree oil seems to kill the critters, what is a quick way to get the nits off the hair, they are the exact same color as his hair and I have trouble seeing them to pull them out, so he keeps getting the critters. It is less and less, but still there.
                              I really do not want to scalp his hair just yet...
                              Thanks
                              Ileana

                               
                              ""Not all sweetness, not all light, some that bark will also bite. Magick that is taken has quite a price, if not given freely you will meet some Fae that aren't too nice." Shadows, Gateway to Faerie, ElvenDrums"

                              In short: Watch out for the red-headed ones! :-)



                              From: Apollonia de Avena <apollonia_de_ avena@yahoo. com>
                              To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                              Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:34:22 AM
                              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                              I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
                              Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
                               
                              I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
                               
                               
                              Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
                               
                              Apollonia


                              --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

                              From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
                              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
                              To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

                              All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
                               
                              When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
                               
                              For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
                               
                              The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
                               
                              Treasach
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
                              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


                              Shea butter
                              Cocoa butter
                              Vitamin E
                               
                              All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
                              You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
                               
                              Apollonia


                            • ileana boyd
                              Holy cow!!! That stuff sounds like a fix for so many problems at once that I am going to bust my tail to try and find it this weekend. Thanks guys very
                              Message 14 of 24 , Mar 20, 2009
                                Holy cow!!! That stuff sounds like a fix for so many problems at once that I am going to bust my tail to try and find it this weekend.
                                Thanks guys
                                very helpful.
                                yis
                                Guileana
                                 
                                ""Not all sweetness, not all light, some that bark will also bite. Magick that is taken has quite a price, if not given freely you will meet some Fae that aren't too nice." Shadows, Gateway to Faerie, ElvenDrums"

                                In short: Watch out for the red-headed ones! :-)



                                From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@...>
                                To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, March 20, 2009 1:55:31 AM
                                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                                I use a nit comb every day , of course, and don't forget that Diatomaceous earth will kill the adults and the eggs, and it can be dusted into the hair, bedclothes, and other places the 'lil kritters might hide.  And all the laundry loads should have Borax in them.  That should just about do it.
                                 
                                 
                                Treasach
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 4:50 AM
                                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                                Grape seed oil can be found in Krogers with the olive oils.  I love it and use it with my other oils as my base.
                                Okay, so now here is my question: my long haired teenage son has lice, tea tree oil seems to kill the critters, what is a quick way to get the nits off the hair, they are the exact same color as his hair and I have trouble seeing them to pull them out, so he keeps getting the critters. It is less and less, but still there.
                                I really do not want to scalp his hair just yet...
                                Thanks
                                Ileana

                                 
                                ""Not all sweetness, not all light, some that bark will also bite. Magick that is taken has quite a price, if not given freely you will meet some Fae that aren't too nice." Shadows, Gateway to Faerie, ElvenDrums"

                                In short: Watch out for the red-headed ones! :-)



                                From: Apollonia de Avena <apollonia_de_ avena@yahoo. com>
                                To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:34:22 AM
                                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question

                                I don't recall the OP saying she had a skin condition she needed a "healing" cream for.  It was already suggested (and I agree) that the condition on her fingers was more than likely a reaction to the lanolin, and then the question was asked about a substitution.  If the lanonlin was doing her just fine, then any of these oils (by themselves or in combination) would continue to work for her and alleviate her potential reaction from lanolin.
                                Olive oil is a great alternative as well, and very inexpensive.
                                 
                                I agree that individually these oils/butters would not heal a skin condition, but they will help prevent chafing associated with breast-feeding (which I believe was the OP's indicated use).
                                 
                                 
                                Also, many people are not lucky enough to live near a store that sells vitamin E oil in bottles (and they don't shop on the internet), so cutting the caps would be an alternative.  I recently moved to a city that the oil in the bottle was way more expensive than just buying a small bottle of caps and using them as "single dose" vials. Of course, if you are making a large amount of salve, it wouldn't make sense to cut open several caps, and therefore, getting ahold of a bottle would be more logical.
                                 
                                Apollonia


                                --- On Sun, 3/15/09, McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net> wrote:

                                From: McIsaac & Capnerhurst <cageytlc@telus. net>
                                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question
                                To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                                Date: Sunday, March 15, 2009, 11:41 PM

                                All of those are not very handy on their own.  Cocoa butter holds in moisture.  So does shea, and it lubricates.  Vit. E is a fat soluble vitamin that helps nourish and heal the skin.  All of those do only one or tow jobs, which is why they and other skin conditioners are put together to moisture, heal, lubricated, and seal the skin.
                                 
                                When I make my skin conditioners, I put together edible oils, butters with different properties, waters with healing properties, and preservatives that are also food grade and help with anti-bac and anti-viral on your skin.
                                 
                                For those are not familiar with the more complicated creams and salves, I would use an edible oil, like olive or grapeseed, and blend it with beeswax to make a salve.  Butters can always be added for emollient, and a vinegar or rosewater wash to refresh and tone.  I also infuse the oil with healing herbs first as well.
                                 
                                The most expensive way to get Vit. E is to buy the caps and cut them open.  I get bioavailable vit. E in a squeeze bulb bottle.
                                 
                                Treasach
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 9:35 PM
                                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Moisturizing question


                                Shea butter
                                Cocoa butter
                                Vitamin E
                                 
                                All great natural moisturizers and all safe for baby.  Make sure you buy preparations without other chemicals in them (read the labels).  For the vitamin E, you can buy prepared products, but you can also just buy the capsules and cut them open, spreading the oil onto your skin :) 
                                You don't need to completely remove any of these from your nipples before breastfeeding, but you want to wipe off any excess.
                                 
                                Apollonia



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