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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Headaches in period?

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  • Dianna Haught
    Lavender was traditionally used for sinus headaches. It works very well, unless.... One year for our anniversery I d thought I d be all cutesy and romantic
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 13, 2008
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      Lavender was traditionally used for sinus headaches.  It works very well, unless....

      One year for our anniversery I'd thought I'd be all cutesy and romantic and spread our bed with lavender blossoms.  Turns out husband is allergic and spent the next three days zonked out on antihistimines.  Not romantic.  Poo.

      Otherwise, lavender oil applied to the forehead for sinus related headaches.
      Avacyn

      There's documented evidence of the Romans actually drilling holes through the skull to relieve pressure caused by continual migraines.  I don't recall such evidence being found after that period of such drastic surgery though.  In period, I believe white willow would have been the preferred pain reliever, followed by opiates for severe cases.  Hildegard used a poultice of vinegar and opium.

      Ameline

      On Sat, Sep 13, 2008 at 12:18 PM, Laurel <aisinbiya@...> wrote:

      Do period sources ever mention headaches or migraines? Was pain
      something that medieval europeans paid any sort of attention to? What
      did they do to help reduce it?




      --
      www.crookedwall.org
      www.bthumbstudios.com

      English doesn't just borrow words from other languages.  It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
    • Kingstaste
      Someone mentioned Hildegaard s remedy. She evidently suffered from migraines quite often, some of them leading to mystical visions and writing. There is
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 13, 2008
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        Someone mentioned Hildegaard’s remedy.  She evidently suffered from migraines quite often, some of them leading to mystical visions and writing.  There is speculation that many mystics were having visions through the pain of migraines.  So yes, there is quite a bit of period documentation for them, although they are not always recognized as migraines per se.

        Christianna

        Home instead of at Coronation because all the gas stations are closed today!

         


        From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Laurel
        Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2008 12:18 PM
        To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Headaches in period?

         

        Do period sources ever mention headaches or migraines? Was pain
        something that medieval europeans paid any sort of attention to? What
        did they do to help reduce it?

      • Lila Richards
        ... Trepanning, as this is called, was used down to relatively modern times (18th C - not sure about later than this). Sinech. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
        Message 3 of 20 , Sep 13, 2008
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          Amy Provost wrote:
          > There's documented evidence of the Romans actually drilling holes through
          > the skull to relieve pressure caused by continual migraines. I don't recall
          > such evidence being found after that period of such drastic surgery though.

          Trepanning, as this is called, was used down to relatively modern times (18th C - not sure about later than this).

          Sinech.


          * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
          An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
        • alandleslyan
          You might find the word megrim used in period. Classicists called their pain, if it was just on one side of the head, hemikrania , from the Greek
          Message 4 of 20 , Sep 15, 2008
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            You might find the word 'megrim' used in period. Classicists called
            their pain, if it was just on one side of the head,'hemikrania', from
            the Greek hemi-(half)+ kranion (cranium). The French modified this to
            (silent 'h') e'migraine, and by the C14th to 'migreime, Englished to
            megrim. By the C15th "megrim" and "migraine" are used nterchangeably,
            though 'megrim" also refers to vertigo or dizziness and, in the non-
            medical arena, to a fancy or whim or to low spirits. Some megrims or
            migraines do not include headache. They may or may not be preceded by
            an aura.

            A Standard herbal response to megrim was to use Feverfew

            Pain was certainly given attention, and was the subject of much
            scholastic debate, both as a religious topic (eg did pain define the
            human condition ?) and as a medical one - the type/description of the
            pain being regarded as a strong indicator of the cause/source of the
            malady. According to Pietro d'Abano (c.1250-c.1316) of the University
            of Padua, pain could be throbbing, dull, stabbing, distending,
            pressing, vibrating/shaking, piercing, gnawing, nailing, crushing,
            grappling, freezing, itching, harsh or loose.

            The treatment regime for the pain would depend on its cause/source
            but certainly opiates and some fairly heavy duty poisons (eg hemlock,
            as cultivated at Soutra Aisle ) were available.




            --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Laurel" <aisinbiya@...> wrote:
            >
            > Do period sources ever mention headaches or migraines? Was pain
            > something that medieval europeans paid any sort of attention to?
            What
            > did they do to help reduce it?
            >
          • Lady Biya
            that s interesting about the feverfew because I believe my standard herbalism book here at home says to use feverfew for headaches. So it s an old standby
            Message 5 of 20 , Sep 15, 2008
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              that's interesting about the feverfew because I believe my standard herbalism book here at home says to use feverfew for headaches.  So it's an "old standby" for a long time then?

              Also, on the white willow...if a person is allergic to aspirin, is a person automatically allergic to the white willow?  I heard that aspirin is made from the white willow?


              --
              Lady Biya Sama
              http://biyasama.com
              Knowne World Aviculturists
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scaparrots
            • Dianna Haught
              I ve never used feverfew so can t comment on it. But the active ingrediant in white willow is the same acid used to make aspirin. Salcilates (almost
              Message 6 of 20 , Sep 15, 2008
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                I've never used feverfew so can't comment on it. But the active ingrediant in white willow is the same acid used to make aspirin. Salcilates (almost certainly not spelled correctly) are NSAIDs and people who have been warned against NSAID usage shouldn't use them. The other problem with it is that it can be VERY upsetting to the stomach.
                Avacyn

                >that's interesting about the feverfew because I believe my standard herbalism book here at home says to use feverfew for headaches. So it's an "old standby" for a long time then?
                >
                >Also, on the white willow...if a person is allergic to aspirin, is a person automatically allergic to the white willow? I heard that aspirin is made from the white willow?

                English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
              • Kingstaste
                I used feverfew for years, with very good success. I took a couple of capsules daily, and the first time I had what felt like it was going to be a migraine
                Message 7 of 20 , Sep 15, 2008
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                  I used feverfew for years, with very good success.  I took a couple of capsules daily, and the first time I had what felt like it was going to be a migraine after I started taking it, I had the very odd sensation of feeling like there was a space where the headache would be if it were there, but it didn’t hurt.  After that, they just quit.  I had someone else describe this same experience, feeling like there was a place that the headache should be but wasn’t. 

                  I have since eliminated several things from my diet and no longer deal with migraines, so I don’t take it anymore.  But it was a wonderful way to start weaning myself off of the pharmaceutical ‘answers’ that were all I had to go on at the time.

                  Christianna

                   


                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Dianna Haught
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 12:03 AM
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Headaches in period?

                   

                  I've never used feverfew so can't comment on it. But the active ingrediant in white willow is the same acid used to make aspirin. Salcilates (almost certainly not spelled correctly) are NSAIDs and people who have been warned against NSAID usage shouldn't use them. The other problem with it is that it can be VERY upsetting to the stomach.
                  Avacyn

                  >that's interesting about the feverfew because I believe my standard
                  herbalism book here at home says to use feverfew for headaches. So it's an "old standby" for a long time then?
                  >
                  >Also, on the white willow...if a person is allergic to aspirin, is a person
                  automatically allergic to the white willow? I heard that aspirin is made from the white willow?

                  English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.

                • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
                  Aspirin is NOT the same as willow bark. Willow bark is salicylic acid, and a natural substance found in many plants. Aspirin is a patentable and unnatural
                  Message 8 of 20 , Sep 15, 2008
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                    Aspirin is NOT the same as willow bark.
                     
                    Willow bark is salicylic acid, and a natural substance found in many plants.  Aspirin is a patentable and unnatural lab-created derivative, acetylsalicylic acid.
                     
                    Most cautions are more based on the idea of the synthetic salicylic acid than willow.
                     
                     
                    "Extracting salicin from herbs was considered to be expensive and time-consuming, so a synthetic salicylic acid version was developed in Germany in 1852 and quickly became the treatment of choice (salicin is converted in the body to salicylic acid).

                    The problem was that it was harder on the stomach. At therapeutic doses, people using the synthetic salicyclic acid developed stomach ulcers and bleeding.

                    The German company Bayer eventually created a synthetic, less harsh derivative of salicylic acid, called acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and mass-produced it under the name aspirin. Despite this, aspirin is still known for irritating the stomach lining....People take white willow bark instead of aspirin because it does not appear to be as irritating to the stomach lining. It may be because the salicin found naturally in white willow bark is only converted to the acid form after it is absorbed by the stomach.

                    Researchers have also suggested that white willow bark is more effective than aspirin because of other active compounds that are found in the bark but not the drug. Animal research at Cairo University compared a willow bark extract to ASA and found that a willow bark extract was as effective as aspirin in reducing inflammation, even though the salicin content was lower than an equivalent dose of ASA. "  http://altmedicine.about.com/od/completeazindex/a/willow_bark.htm
                     
                    The following caution seems to be based more on Aspirin and the synthetic salicylic acid than willow.  Perhaps that's why some of the following myths keep circulating: "Because willow bark contains salicin, people who are allergic or sensitive to salicylates (such as aspirin) should not use willow bark. Some researchers suggest that people with asthma, diabetes, gout, gastritis, haemophilia, and stomach ulcers should also avoid willow bark. If you have any of these conditions, take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) regularly or blood-thinning medication, be sure to consult your health care provider before taking willow bark. Willow bark should not given to children under the age of 16. "  http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/willow-bark-000281.htm
                     
                    Treasach
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 10:02 PM
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Headaches in period?

                    I've never used feverfew so can't comment on it. But the active ingrediant in white willow is the same acid used to make aspirin. Salcilates (almost certainly not spelled correctly) are NSAIDs and people who have been warned against NSAID usage shouldn't use them. The other problem with it is that it can be VERY upsetting to the stomach.
                    Avacyn

                    >that's interesting about the feverfew because I believe my standard herbalism book here at home says to use feverfew for headaches. So it's an "old standby" for a long time then?
                    >
                    >Also, on the white willow...if a person is allergic to aspirin, is a person automatically allergic to the white willow? I heard that aspirin is made from the white willow?

                    English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.

                  • Lady Biya
                    okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me assess risk: the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all hearing for close to
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                      okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me assess risk:  the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all hearing for close to two or three full DAYS.  A medical professional told me that consistutes a severe allergic reaction.
                       
                      Should I consider willow bark off limits?  I can take advil without any issues, which kinda shocks my GP.  but I won't take aspirin after that.
                       
                      I need some help with my migraines.  Topomax is NOT cutting it and my current neurologist is NOT listening to me.  I plan to speak to my GP when i see him next time about that one.  unfortunately my neurologist has a "one size fits all" approach to migraine treatment which doesn't work for a patient whose migraine is rooted in a head injury from 22 years ago. 
                       
                      Something said on a migraine list i'm on said to me yesturday is that NO ONE knows my migraine or my body better than i do and that I need to be persistant if someone is not listening to me--this is MY health that is at stake and it's the doctor's job to address MY needs for a treatment plan that works for ME.  The point is to get rid of the headache.  whatever that takes.
                       
                      So I'm done with the "just the topomax" treatment.  I want to try new things now.  And certainly I have to believe that in period, they knew a thing or two about migraines as well.
                       
                      Has anyone added feverfew to topomax?  is that fine to do?

                    • alandleslyan
                      We d say generally DONT mix em. Specificaly, tho - you say your migraines date back to a head injury. Have you tried sacro-cranial therapy ? One of our folk
                      Message 10 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                        We'd say generally DONT mix em.

                        Specificaly, tho - you say your migraines date back to a head injury.
                        Have you tried sacro-cranial therapy ?

                        One of our folk who was head-injured in a fall from a horse found it
                        extremely beneficial, not only in relieving her eye/neck/head pain,
                        but in unlocking a lot of patterned-in muscular clension : she hadnt
                        realised she was still in active stress defence mode even after some
                        several years.

                        Love and light



                        --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Lady Biya" <aisinbiya@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me
                        assess
                        > risk: the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all
                        hearing for
                        > close to two or three full DAYS. A medical professional told me
                        that
                        > consistutes a severe allergic reaction.
                        >
                        > Should I consider willow bark off limits? I can take advil without
                        any
                        > issues, which kinda shocks my GP. but I won't take aspirin after
                        that.
                        >
                        > I need some help with my migraines. Topomax is NOT cutting it and
                        my
                        > current neurologist is NOT listening to me. I plan to speak to my
                        GP when i
                        > see him next time about that one. unfortunately my neurologist has
                        a "one
                        > size fits all" approach to migraine treatment which doesn't work
                        for a
                        > patient whose migraine is rooted in a head injury from 22 years ago.
                        >
                        > Something said on a migraine list i'm on said to me yesturday is
                        that NO ONE
                        > knows my migraine or my body better than i do and that I need to be
                        > persistant if someone is not listening to me--this is MY health
                        that is at
                        > stake and it's the doctor's job to address MY needs for a treatment
                        plan
                        > that works for ME. The point is to get rid of the headache.
                        whatever that
                        > takes.
                        >
                        > So I'm done with the "just the topomax" treatment. I want to try
                        new things
                        > now. And certainly I have to believe that in period, they knew a
                        thing or
                        > two about migraines as well.
                        >
                        > Has anyone added feverfew to topomax? is that fine to do?
                        >
                      • Lady Biya
                        I ve never heard of sacro-cranial therapy...can you explain that a bit more???
                        Message 11 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                          I've never heard of sacro-cranial therapy...can you explain that a bit more???


                          --
                          Lady Biya Sama
                          http://biyasama.com
                          Knowne World Aviculturists
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scaparrots
                        • Amy Provost
                          It s actually craniosacral. Although some in the scientific community give it no value, I think it would definitely be worth a shot. I ve had a couple of
                          Message 12 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                            It's actually craniosacral.  Although some in the scientific community give it no value, I think it would definitely be worth a shot. I've had a couple of treatments in the past.  It's very relaxing and does have its benefits.
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craniosacral_therapy

                            Ameline

                            On Tue, Sep 16, 2008 at 7:20 AM, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:

                            I've never heard of sacro-cranial therapy...can you explain that a bit more???


                            --
                            Lady Biya Sama
                            http://biyasama.com
                            Knowne World Aviculturists
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scaparrots



                            --
                            www.crookedwall.org
                            www.bthumbstudios.com
                          • alandleslyan
                            Okay here goes (our understanding): The connective sutures which join the plates of the skull together consist of 5 different layers, the upper 2 locked, the
                            Message 13 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                              Okay here goes (our understanding):

                              The connective sutures which join the plates of the skull together
                              consist of 5 different layers, the upper 2 locked, the lower 3
                              movable and affected by the movement of membranic fluids, which
                              fluids pulsate in a closed system, unaffected by heart rate or
                              breathing. Like tidal ebb and flood the fluids lowers/increase
                              volume/pressure between the membranes of the brain in a slow
                              rhythmical movement, which can become compromised in instances where
                              2 or more plates of the skull have in some way become locked together

                              Sacro-cranial is a non-invasive therapy, using light touch to assess
                              the quality of your Cranial Rhythm. This can then be compared to a
                              healthy (8-12 pulses/minute) rhythm, to assess the state of your body
                              and determine how well it is functioning. Light contact is made with
                              the cranial and spinal bones in order to optimise the rhythm, boost
                              blood circulation and drain lymph and sinus fluids in the head. As
                              the appropriate bones are held and gentle contact made with the soft
                              tissue, you may be asked to concentrate on your breathing and on
                              releasing tension.

                              Hopefully you should be able to find a practitioner in your area by
                              consulting a directory of alternative therapists

                              To attempt a return to 'in period,there is ample evidence of massage,
                              including head massage, being practiced in the East: eg see
                              GODE, P.K. (PARSHURAM KRISHNA). "History of the Practice of Massage
                              in Ancient and Medieval India Between c. B.C. 1000 and A.D. 1900,"
                              Annals of the Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute. Vol. XXXVI,
                              Parts I-II.

                              Love and Light

                              --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Lady Biya" <aisinbiya@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > I've never heard of sacro-cranial therapy...can you explain that a
                              bit
                              > more???
                              >
                              >
                              > > --
                              > > Lady Biya Sama
                              > > http://biyasama.com
                              > > Knowne World Aviculturists
                              > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scaparrots
                              > >
                              >
                            • Jennifer Heise
                              ... Speaking as a complete, utter amateur who s read too many herbal and medical books-- YES. I would stay away from willow bark, and also from Meadowsweet,
                              Message 14 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                                On Tue, Sep 16, 2008 at 6:42 AM, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:
                                > okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me assess
                                > risk: the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all hearing for
                                > close to two or three full DAYS. A medical professional told me that
                                > consistutes a severe allergic reaction.
                                >
                                > Should I consider willow bark off limits? I can take advil without any
                                > issues, which kinda shocks my GP. but I won't take aspirin after that.

                                Speaking as a complete, utter amateur who's read too many herbal and
                                medical books-- YES. I would stay away from willow bark, and also from
                                Meadowsweet, A.K.A. Queen of the Meadow, which has a significant
                                component of salicylic acid.
                                It may not be necessary, but I, personally, would go for the 'Let's
                                not repeat this experience' answer. There's some information about the
                                Salicylate intolerance/allergy/sensitivity at a reasonably reliable
                                MD-style medicine site here:
                                http://www.webmd.com/allergies/guide/salicylate-allergy

                                Good luck.
                              • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
                                A good physiotherapist should be able to determine if it really is a migraine, or just a misdiagnosed head injury. Mine was TMD after a car accident, and
                                Message 15 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                                  A good physiotherapist should be able to determine if it really is a migraine, or just a misdiagnosed head injury.  Mine was TMD after a car accident, and instead of surgery or drugs, my physiotherapist just fixed the problem itself.  Now that has she trained me, I know how to re-align myself, and never suffer like that again. 
                                   
                                  "Many people who suffer from chronic headaches and migraines do not know that temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) causes them....The strained muscles in your head, face, and neck can cause headaches or TMJ migraines. TMJ headaches are often so painful, severe, and frequent that they are misdiagnosed as migraines.

                                  http://ezinearticles.com/?Is-Your-Migraine-a-TMJ-Migraine?&id=165278

                                  Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD) is a common condition affecting as many as four out of every five people.  TMD is often referred to as TMJ and is also known as Myofacial Pain Syndrome or Cranio-mandibular Dysfunction.  TMD is a complex problem with multiple contributing factors and varying levels of severity. 

                                  Do you have these symptoms?

                                  • Frequent headaches 
                                  • Severe / migraine headaches 
                                  • Jaw joint pain
                                  • Jaw joint noise
                                  • Ear congestion
                                  • Dizziness
                                  • Ringing in the ears
                                  • Difficulty swallowing
                                  • Clenching / grinding
                                  • Facial pain / fatigue
                                  • Sensitive teeth
                                  • Neck pain
                                  • Postural problems
                                  • Tingling of the fingertips
                                  • Nervousness or insomnia
                                  • Snoring or Sleep Apnea
                                  • Motor Vehicle Accidents
                                   
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Lady Biya
                                  Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 4:42 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Headaches in period?

                                  okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me assess risk:  the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all hearing for close to two or three full DAYS.  A medical professional told me that consistutes a severe allergic reaction.
                                   
                                  Should I consider willow bark off limits?  I can take advil without any issues, which kinda shocks my GP.  but I won't take aspirin after that.
                                   
                                  I need some help with my migraines.  Topomax is NOT cutting it and my current neurologist is NOT listening to me.  I plan to speak to my GP when i see him next time about that one.  unfortunately my neurologist has a "one size fits all" approach to migraine treatment which doesn't work for a patient whose migraine is rooted in a head injury from 22 years ago. 
                                   
                                  Something said on a migraine list i'm on said to me yesturday is that NO ONE knows my migraine or my body better than i do and that I need to be persistant if someone is not listening to me--this is MY health that is at stake and it's the doctor's job to address MY needs for a treatment plan that works for ME.  The point is to get rid of the headache.  whatever that takes.
                                   
                                  So I'm done with the "just the topomax" treatment.  I want to try new things now.  And certainly I have to believe that in period, they knew a thing or two about migraines as well.
                                   
                                  Has anyone added feverfew to topomax?  is that fine to do?

                                • Carowyn Silveroak
                                  Greetings, ... close to two or three full DAYS. A medical professional told me that constitutes a severe allergic reaction. The last time I took aspirin, I
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                                    Greetings,
                                     
                                    > the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all hearing for
                                    close to two or three full DAYS.  A medical professional told me that constitutes a severe allergic reaction.
                                     
                                    The last time I took aspirin, I lost all feeling in my hands and feet for about 24-36 hours.  (And like a fidiot I drove a car, which I Do Not Recommend Ever....I got a clue-bat later.....)  I can also take Advil, and Tylenol, but I avoid willow bark.
                                     
                                    Meadowsweet, eh?  Shall check that out for avoidance!
                                     
                                    (I also have asthma, and with such a severe reaction, I'm not going to try willow bark.  Better to just avoid, I have some really.....odd.....severe allergies....)
                                     
                                    -Carowyn's 2 pence


                                    ____________________________________________________________
                                    Recharge and relax. Click for great vacation ideas.

                                  • tigurgurl03
                                    I am speaking not as someone trained or studying herbology but as a LPN and a RN student. ... assess ... hearing for ... that ... Let me take the question out
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
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                                      I am speaking not as someone trained or studying herbology but as a
                                      LPN and a RN student.

                                      > okay, well then let me put this out there so everyone can help me
                                      assess
                                      > risk: the last time I took an aspirin as a teenager, I lost all
                                      hearing for
                                      > close to two or three full DAYS. A medical professional told me
                                      that
                                      > consistutes a severe allergic reaction.

                                      Let me take the question out of it. YES THAT IS A SERIOUS ALLERGIC
                                      REACTION!!!!!!

                                      > Should I consider willow bark off limits? I can take advil without
                                      any
                                      > issues, which kinda shocks my GP. but I won't take aspirin after
                                      that.

                                      For the sake of safety, yes consider anything known to have any
                                      connection to aspirin off limits. And the Advil thing shouldn't shock
                                      your GP considering name brand Advil is ibuprofen, which while is an
                                      NSAID, is not related to aspirin.

                                      > I need some help with my migraines. Topomax is NOT cutting it and
                                      my
                                      > current neurologist is NOT listening to me.

                                      Piece of advice, get a new neurolgist.

                                      <<snipped>>
                                      > Something said on a migraine list i'm on said to me yesturday is
                                      that NO ONE
                                      > knows my migraine or my body better than i do and that I need to be
                                      > persistant if someone is not listening to me--this is MY health
                                      that is at
                                      > stake and it's the doctor's job to address MY needs for a treatment
                                      plan
                                      > that works for ME. The point is to get rid of the headache.
                                      whatever that
                                      > takes.

                                      They are absolutely 100% RIGHT. Listen to them and your body.

                                      <<snipped>>
                                      > Has anyone added feverfew to topomax? is that fine to do?

                                      Do NOT mix herbal and prescriptions without at least consulting your
                                      GP AND your pharmacist first. I say the pharmacist because they go to
                                      school for 4-7 years to learn nothing but drugs. They know them
                                      better than most doctors.

                                      I hope that I do not offend anyone with this email. Please, please,
                                      PLEASE do not wait to see your GP and find a new neurologist. Call
                                      your GP and if nothing else, talk to their nurse, that way they have
                                      a heads up there is a problem. It's not bad to try to fix things
                                      yourself, but if these are truely from a head injury, they need to be
                                      monitored. You only have so much room in your skull for everything
                                      that has to fit in there. If one thing gets messed up, it can really
                                      screw you up.

                                      I hope this helps,
                                      Catherine Vallemont
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