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herbs for illumination

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  • Brett Chandler-Finch
    Can someone give me a list of the most commonly used herbs for making paints for illumination and calligraphy. I want to start carrying them in my vendor
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 20, 2008
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      Can someone give me a list of the most commonly used herbs for making
      paints for illumination and calligraphy. I want to start carrying
      them in my vendor booth.
    • catherine_dewinter
      ... Medieval scribal pigments were mostly mineral earths (often toxic, containing lead or arsenic or mercury) because most herbs did not give satisfactory
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 21, 2008
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        --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Brett Chandler-Finch" <goldweard@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can someone give me a list of the most commonly used herbs for making
        > paints for illumination and calligraphy. I want to start carrying
        > them in my vendor booth.
        >
        Medieval scribal pigments were mostly mineral earths (often toxic, containing lead or arsenic
        or mercury) because most herbs did not give satisfactory lasting color. When used as
        pigments, vegetable substances were often stabilized with gum arabic or mastic.

        Blue: indigo or woad
        Red: Carmine (kermes insect) stabilized with a madder glaze, rose madder lake (white
        mineral powder dyed as if it was a textile) or brazilwood from Ceylon, or the lichen orchil
        Yellow: Indian saffron, safflower, or pomegranate rind.

        Suggest you substitute titanium white, vine or bone black, madder or cochineal, raw and
        burnt sienna earths, ochre, verdigris or verona green, and ultramarine or indigo. These
        should be medieval enough to suit your clients.

        Catherine de W
      • Eric Kobuck Wagner
        This also all depends on what you are doing your illumination on. (ie: type of vellum, or what the actual rag content is in the paper, etc.) As an
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 22, 2008
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          This also all depends on what you are doing your illumination on. (ie: type of vellum, or what the actual rag content is in the paper, etc.) As an herbalist/scribe before using something new I always give it a test run.  I suggest you do this with the suggested items.  Then with the successes make up a display that shows your customers what the end result will be on different mediums.
           
          Aricia Jehane

          catherine_dewinter <hedgehog4@...> wrote:
          --- In SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com, "Brett Chandler-Finch" <goldweard@. ..> wrote:
          >
          > Can someone give me a list of the most commonly used herbs for making
          > paints for illumination and calligraphy. I want to start carrying
          > them in my vendor booth.
          >
          Medieval scribal pigments were mostly mineral earths (often toxic, containing lead or arsenic
          or mercury) because most herbs did not give satisfactory lasting color. When used as
          pigments, vegetable substances were often stabilized with gum arabic or mastic.

          Blue: indigo or woad
          Red: Carmine (kermes insect) stabilized with a madder glaze, rose madder lake (white
          mineral powder dyed as if it was a textile) or brazilwood from Ceylon, or the lichen orchil
          Yellow: Indian saffron, safflower, or pomegranate rind.

          Suggest you substitute titanium white, vine or bone black, madder or cochineal, raw and
          burnt sienna earths, ochre, verdigris or verona green, and ultramarine or indigo. These
          should be medieval enough to suit your clients.

          Catherine de W


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