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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Dyeing (was Hats)

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  • Dianne
    I m getting the urge to dye with chicory. The flowers are such a pretty color! Anyone every use them? What else did you use with it to set the color? Lore
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 17, 2008
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      I'm getting the urge to dye with chicory. The flowers are such a pretty
      color! Anyone every use them? What else did you use with it to "set"
      the color?

      Lore >>
       
      I've never dyed with chicory, but I would love to find something that gives that gorgeous color.
       
      Laurensa

    • Lila Richards
      ... Your best bet might be woad - generally speaking, flowers produce gold colours, regardless of the colour of the flower. Sinech. * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
      Message 2 of 18 , Jul 17, 2008
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        Dianne wrote:
        > I'm getting the urge to dye with chicory. The flowers are such a pretty
        > color! Anyone every use them? What else did you use with it to "set"
        > the color?
        >
        > Lore >>
        >
        > I've never dyed with chicory, but I would love to find something that gives that gorgeous color.
        >

        Your best bet might be woad - generally speaking, flowers produce gold colours, regardless of the colour of the flower.

        Sinech.


        * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
        An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
      • Dianna Haught
        Some while back I found a two papers which document the use of lanolin in period for us.
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 5, 2008
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          Some while back I found a two papers which document the use of lanolin in period for us.

          Clark EW.
          No Abstract
          A brief history of lanolin.
          Pharm Hist (Lond). 1980 Dec;10(3):5-6. No abstract available.
          PMID: 11630744 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
          2:
          Related Articles, Links
          Jung L, Métais MC, Bachoffner P.
          No Abstract
          [Physico-chemical analysis of an ointment dating from the 13th-14th century]
          Ann Pharm Fr. 1972 Mar;30(3):205-10. French. No abstract available.
          PMID: 5050892 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

          Due to a move and a friend given to mishaps, I no longer have copies of either of these papers nor to a library loan system from which I can acquire them.  If anyone can get copies of these papers for me (I'm willing to pay reasonable library fees - not the 40/per paper or whatever Pubmed charges) and can get a copy of these papers, I'd really appreciate it.


          Secondus:  I may be getting my hands on 5 pounds of very greasy heritage Shetland wool.  I'd love to try extracting some of the lanolin from the wool in such a way that I can keep the lanolin.  (Part herbalist project/part sheep to shawl project/part SCA 50's Challenge/part this lady is crazy as loon project).  The only method that I know of involves weighting the wool down in a pot of very warm water and skimming the lanolin as it rises to the top.  But I don't have documentation for this.  Does anyone know of any documented methods of extracting lanolin from wool or any good sources. 

          The controversy in medieval usage of lanolin is that it is often referred to as "sheep's grease" which lead some people to believe that they were referrring to the fat of the sheep and not the lanolin because they said that lanolin couldn't be documented as being used in period.  I've solved to my satisfication that it was, now if I can only get my hands on these papers once again.  Sigh.
          Thank you.
          Avacyn
          English doesn't just borrow words from other languages.  It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
        • barclayoms
          Greetings, Avacyn! I was just talking with a friend about sheep-shearing today, and then I saw your question about extracting lanolin. I wish I could find you
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 10, 2008
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            Greetings, Avacyn!
            I was just talking with a friend about sheep-shearing today, and then
            I saw your question about extracting lanolin. I wish I could find you
            an actual medieval document, instead of an actual farm woman who
            shears sheep! My father, until this year, always kept several sheep
            for the meat, but decided that they were too much for him to deal
            with, as he is 84. He gave his little flock to the woman who shears
            them, which she used to do for free because he gave her the wool as
            barter. Back the subject, she boils the cut wool for a few hours in
            water that has quite a bit of salt in it, which helps separate out
            more grease. The grease will float to the top and is skimmed off.
            That will be pretty dirty. You put the dirty lanolin in a container
            with water and some other oil and shake it really well. I thought of
            using an old crank and paddle butter churn we used to have somewhere.
            The water and oil will pick up all the dirty bits, and the white
            lanolin will be in one layer between them. So that's just how it's
            done, which I'm sure is exactly how it's been done since the two sheep
            came off the Ark.

            A funny anecdote. About two weeks after we got rid of the sheep,
            there was a big thunderstorm at night. Not long after, I heard the
            sound of sheep baa-ing past my window. In the morning, I found that
            the sheep all came home, with a few of Mimi's sheep, and one very
            large billy goat. The storm spooked them and must have made them
            homesick. How they found their way down two miles of two dirt roads
            in the pitch dark, I'll never know. They must have been a sight!

            Els von der Birkenweide


            --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Dianna Haught <avacyn@...> wrote:
            >
            > Some while back I found a two papers which document the use of
            lanolin in period for us.
            >
            >
            <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11630744?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Clark
            EW.
            >
            <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11630744?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>
            > No Abstract
            >
            > A brief history of lanolin.
            > Pharm Hist (Lond). 1980 Dec;10(3):5-6. No abstract available.
            > PMID: 11630744 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
            > 2:
            >
            <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&DbFrom=pubmed&Cmd=Link&LinkName=pubmed_pubmed&LinkReadableName=Related%20Articles&IdsFromResult=5050892&ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Related
            Articles, Links
            >
            <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5050892?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Jung
            L, Métais MC, Bachoffner P.
            >
            <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5050892?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>
            > No Abstract
            >
            > [Physico-chemical analysis of an ointment dating from the 13th-14th
            century]
            > Ann Pharm Fr. 1972 Mar;30(3):205-10. French. No abstract available.
            > PMID: 5050892 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
            >
            > Due to a move and a friend given to mishaps, I no longer have copies
            of either of these papers nor to a library loan system from which I
            can acquire them. If anyone can get copies of these papers for me
            (I'm willing to pay reasonable library fees - not the 40/per paper or
            whatever Pubmed charges) and can get a copy of these papers, I'd
            really appreciate it.
            >
            >
            > Secondus: I may be getting my hands on 5 pounds of very greasy
            heritage Shetland wool. I'd love to try extracting some of the
            lanolin from the wool in such a way that I can keep the lanolin.
            (Part herbalist project/part sheep to shawl project/part SCA 50's
            Challenge/part this lady is crazy as loon project). The only method
            that I know of involves weighting the wool down in a pot of very warm
            water and skimming the lanolin as it rises to the top. But I don't
            have documentation for this. Does anyone know of any documented
            methods of extracting lanolin from wool or any good sources.
            >
            > The controversy in medieval usage of lanolin is that it is often
            referred to as "sheep's grease" which lead some people to believe that
            they were referrring to the fat of the sheep and not the lanolin
            because they said that lanolin couldn't be documented as being used in
            period. I've solved to my satisfication that it was, now if I can
            only get my hands on these papers once again. Sigh.
            > Thank you.
            > Avacyn
            > English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows
            them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles
            and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
            >
          • Dianna Haught
            Thank you. The only difference I ve heard in the process is from a woman who said to put the wool in a very large jelly bag to boil and the dirt is strained
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 10, 2008
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              Thank you. The only difference I've heard in the process is from a woman who said to put the wool in a very large "jelly bag" to boil and the dirt is strained out during the cooking. I think she meant to make a bag out of that loose woven muslin used to strain jelly. (?) I'd love to be able to document this.

              Love your sheep story. I want so bad to keep a few Angora goats, but my landlord just won't go for it. Of course that may have to do with the fact that my house has very little yard.... Or maybe he just doesn't like goats. hehehehe
              Avacyn

              >Greetings, Avacyn!
              >I was just talking with a friend about sheep-shearing today, and then
              >I saw your question about extracting lanolin. I wish I could find you
              >an actual medieval document, instead of an actual farm woman who
              >shears sheep! My father, until this year, always kept several sheep
              >for the meat, but decided that they were too much for him to deal
              >with, as he is 84. He gave his little flock to the woman who shears
              >them, which she used to do for free because he gave her the wool as
              >barter. Back the subject, she boils the cut wool for a few hours in
              >water that has quite a bit of salt in it, which helps separate out
              >more grease. The grease will float to the top and is skimmed off.
              >That will be pretty dirty. You put the dirty lanolin in a container
              >with water and some other oil and shake it really well. I thought of
              >using an old crank and paddle butter churn we used to have somewhere.
              > The water and oil will pick up all the dirty bits, and the white
              >lanolin will be in one layer between them. So that's just how it's
              >done, which I'm sure is exactly how it's been done since the two sheep
              >came off the Ark.
              >
              >A funny anecdote. About two weeks after we got rid of the sheep,
              >there was a big thunderstorm at night. Not long after, I heard the
              >sound of sheep baa-ing past my window. In the morning, I found that
              >the sheep all came home, with a few of Mimi's sheep, and one very
              >large billy goat. The storm spooked them and must have made them
              >homesick. How they found their way down two miles of two dirt roads
              >in the pitch dark, I'll never know. They must have been a sight!
              >
              >Els von der Birkenweide
              >
              >
              >--- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Dianna Haught <avacyn@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Some while back I found a two papers which document the use of
              >lanolin in period for us.
              >>
              >>
              ><http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11630744?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Clark
              >EW.
              >>
              ><http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11630744?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>
              >> No Abstract
              >>
              >> A brief history of lanolin.
              >> Pharm Hist (Lond). 1980 Dec;10(3):5-6. No abstract available.
              >> PMID: 11630744 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
              >> 2:
              >>
              ><http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&DbFrom=pubmed&Cmd=Link&LinkName=pubmed_pubmed&LinkReadableName=Related%20Articles&IdsFromResult=5050892&ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Related
              >Articles, Links
              >>
              ><http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5050892?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>Jung
              >L, Métais MC, Bachoffner P.
              >>
              ><http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5050892?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>
              >> No Abstract
              >>
              >> [Physico-chemical analysis of an ointment dating from the 13th-14th
              >century]
              >> Ann Pharm Fr. 1972 Mar;30(3):205-10. French. No abstract available.
              >> PMID: 5050892 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
              >>
              >> Due to a move and a friend given to mishaps, I no longer have copies
              >of either of these papers nor to a library loan system from which I
              >can acquire them. If anyone can get copies of these papers for me
              >(I'm willing to pay reasonable library fees - not the 40/per paper or
              >whatever Pubmed charges) and can get a copy of these papers, I'd
              >really appreciate it.
              >>
              >>
              >> Secondus: I may be getting my hands on 5 pounds of very greasy
              >heritage Shetland wool. I'd love to try extracting some of the
              >lanolin from the wool in such a way that I can keep the lanolin.
              >(Part herbalist project/part sheep to shawl project/part SCA 50's
              >Challenge/part this lady is crazy as loon project). The only method
              >that I know of involves weighting the wool down in a pot of very warm
              >water and skimming the lanolin as it rises to the top. But I don't
              >have documentation for this. Does anyone know of any documented
              >methods of extracting lanolin from wool or any good sources.
              >>
              >> The controversy in medieval usage of lanolin is that it is often
              >referred to as "sheep's grease" which lead some people to believe that
              >they were referrring to the fat of the sheep and not the lanolin
              >because they said that lanolin couldn't be documented as being used in
              >period. I've solved to my satisfication that it was, now if I can
              >only get my hands on these papers once again. Sigh.
              >> Thank you.
              >> Avacyn
              >> English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows
              >them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles
              >and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------
              >
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              English doesn't just borrow words from other languages. It follows them down dark alleys, hits them over the head with old beer bottles and rummages through their pockets for loose grammar.
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