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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Massage oils?

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  • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
    Woo hoo! I ve been experimenting with period and modern cosmetics of just this type. Grapeseed is the base. It has a high natural Vit. E content for
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 30, 2008
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      Woo hoo!  I've been experimenting with period and modern cosmetics of just this type.
       
      Grapeseed is the base.  It has a high natural Vit. E content for preservative, and it absorbs the fastest.  "Apricot Kernel Oil (Prunus Armeniaca) is smooth and lightweight, high in Vitamin A and minerals. Apricot Kernel Oil has an excellent texture that is great for all skin types, but preferred by many practitioners for the benefits that it renders for prematurely aged skin and skin that is dry and irritated. "  You can also raid your fridge for other oils (and ALL oils should be stored in your fridge to minimize oxidation), such as olive, seasame, and sunflower.
       
      "Olive:  Most people are familiar with olive oil as a cooking oil, but it is occasionally used for massage. It is a heavy oil with a greasy or sticky texture and recognizable aroma that many associate with cooking, so it's usually not used on its own for massage.

      One study compared topical olive oil with sunflower oil and found that olive oil had no effect on epidermal barrier function, whereas topical sunflower oil resulted in significant improvement in the skin barrier."  http://altmedicine.about.com/od/massage/a/massage_oil.htm
       
      "Sesame Seed Oil has been used as a healing oil for thousands of years. Sesame oil is mentioned in the Vedas as excellent for humans. It is naturally antibacterial for common skin pathogens, such as staphylococcus and streptococcus as well as common skin fungi, such as athlete's foot fungus. It is naturally antiviral. It is a natural anti inflammatory agent. "  http://www.youthingstrategies.com/qualities.htm
       
      Now, if you are looking at something period, I'd go with a scented perfume oil, something to put in hair and body and bath.  I'd use an olive base, since it's a period trade item, and experiment with the right amount of Jasmine and Ylang for a pleasant scent.  Both those oils are period trade.  Unless you want to get really wacky and press fresh flowers between layers of crushed almonds yourself, for period perfumery.  But that's pretty hard core...
       
      Treasach 

       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 2:10 PM
      Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Massage oils?

      I was gifted with the items from someone else's unfinished project. I have 16 oz Apricot Kernel Oil, 16 oz Grapeseed Oil, 1 fl oz Jasmine Oil, .5oz Ylang Ylang essential oil and 8 small brown bottles with dropper lids. I THINK the intent was to produce 8 small bottles of scented massage oil. I'd like to make something with all this to present to the Queen for her royal gifting stash. What can/should I do with it? If I am to add the scented oil to the unscented oil, which would be best used and in what ratios?
      Help, culinary herbs I know, this is out of my bailiwick.
      Aelfwyn




      Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for fuel-efficient used cars.

    • herrin_raben@bellsouth.net
      Be cautious with scented perfume oils. My dad makes incense and uses a number of the available perfume oils. He s told me that most contain DPG, the same
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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        Be cautious with scented "perfume" oils.  My dad makes incense and uses a number of the available perfume oils.  He's told me that most contain DPG, the same thing as is in antifreeze.  A number of people are allergic to it.  Make certain about what you've got.
         
        Oriel of Clan Dunncan
         
        -------------- Original message from "McIsaac & Capnerhurst" <cageytlc@...>: --------------

        Woo hoo!  I've been experimenting with period and modern cosmetics of just this type.
         
        Grapeseed is the base.  It has a high natural Vit. E content for preservative, and it absorbs the fastest.  "Apricot Kernel Oil (Prunus Armeniaca) is smooth and lightweight, high in Vitamin A and minerals. Apricot Kernel Oil has an excellent texture that is great for all skin types, but preferred by many practitioners for the benefits that it renders for prematurely aged skin and skin that is dry and irritated. "  You can also raid your fridge for other oils (and ALL oils should be stored in your fridge to minimize oxidation), such as olive, seasame, and sunflower.
         
        "Olive:  Most people are familiar with olive oil as a cooking oil, but it is occasionally used for massage. It is a heavy oil with a greasy or sticky texture and recognizable aroma that many associate with cooking, so it's usually not used on its own for massage.

        One study compared topical olive oil with sunflower oil and found that olive oil had no effect on epidermal barrier function, whereas topical sunflower oil resulted in significant improvement in the skin barrier."  http://altmedicine. about.com/ od/massage/ a/massage_ oil.htm
         
        "Sesame Seed Oil has been used as a healing oil for thousands of years. Sesame oil is mentioned in the Vedas as excellent for humans. It is naturally antibacterial for common skin pathogens, such as staphylococcus and streptococcus as well as common skin fungi, such as athlete's foot fungus. It is naturally antiviral. It is a natural anti inflammatory agent. "  http://www.youthing strategies. com/qualities. htm
         
        Now, if you are looking at something period, I'd go with a scented perfume oil, something to put in hair and body and bath.  I'd use an olive base, since it's a period trade item, and experiment with the right amount of Jasmine and Ylang for a pleasant scent.  Both those oils are period trade.  Unless you want to get really wacky and press fresh flowers between layers of crushed almonds yourself, for period perfumery.  But that's pretty hard core...
         
        Treasach 

         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 2:10 PM
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Massage oils?

        I was gifted with the items from someone else's unfinished project. I have 16 oz Apricot Kernel Oil, 16 oz Grapeseed Oil, 1 fl oz Jasmine Oil, .5oz Ylang Ylang essential oil and 8 small brown bottles with dropper lids. I THINK the intent was to produce 8 small bottles of scented massage oil. I'd like to make something with all this to present to the Queen for her royal gifting stash. What can/should I do with it? If I am to add the scented oil to the unscented oil, which would be best used and in what ratios?
        Help, culinary herbs I know, this is out of my bailiwick.
        Aelfwyn




        Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for fuel-efficient used cars.

      • Sydney Walker Freedman
        Dod you say 1 oz jasmine? That may very well be a fragrance oil of the sort mentioned below rather than a true absolute (that volume of a true jasmine extract
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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          Dod you say 1 oz jasmine? That may very well be a fragrance oil of the
          sort mentioned below rather than a true absolute (that volume of a true
          jasmine extract would be rather expensive). Check the labels, and have
          fun. :) Oh, I'm curious; what's the reference for ylang-ylang in period?

          Pax Christi,
          Lady Cecilia de Cambrige


          > Be cautious with scented "perfume" oils. My dad makes incense and uses a
          > number of the available perfume oils. He's told me that most contain DPG,
          > the same thing as is in antifreeze. A number of people are allergic to
          > it. Make certain about what you've got.
          >
          > Oriel of Clan Dunncan
          >
          > -------------- Original message from "McIsaac & Capnerhurst"
          > <cageytlc@...>: --------------
          >
          > Woo hoo! I've been experimenting with period and modern cosmetics of just
          > this type.
          >
          > Grapeseed is the base. It has a high natural Vit. E content for
          > preservative, and it absorbs the fastest. "Apricot Kernel Oil (Prunus
          > Armeniaca) is smooth and lightweight, high in Vitamin A and minerals.
          > Apricot Kernel Oil has an excellent texture that is great for all skin
          > types, but preferred by many practitioners for the benefits that it
          > renders for prematurely aged skin and skin that is dry and irritated. "
          > You can also raid your fridge for other oils (and ALL oils should be
          > stored in your fridge to minimize oxidation), such as olive, seasame, and
          > sunflower.
          >
          > "Olive: Most people are familiar with olive oil as a cooking oil, but it
          > is occasionally used for massage. It is a heavy oil with a greasy or
          > sticky texture and recognizable aroma that many associate with cooking, so
          > it's usually not used on its own for massage.
          >
          > One study compared topical olive oil with sunflower oil and found that
          > olive oil had no effect on epidermal barrier function, whereas topical
          > sunflower oil resulted in significant improvement in the skin barrier."
          > http://altmedicine.about.com/od/massage/a/massage_oil.htm
          >
          > "Sesame Seed Oil has been used as a healing oil for thousands of years.
          > Sesame oil is mentioned in the Vedas as excellent for humans. It is
          > naturally antibacterial for common skin pathogens, such as staphylococcus
          > and streptococcus as well as common skin fungi, such as athlete's foot
          > fungus. It is naturally antiviral. It is a natural anti inflammatory
          > agent. " http://www.youthingstrategies.com/qualities.htm
          >
          > Now, if you are looking at something period, I'd go with a scented perfume
          > oil, something to put in hair and body and bath. I'd use an olive base,
          > since it's a period trade item, and experiment with the right amount of
          > Jasmine and Ylang for a pleasant scent. Both those oils are period trade.
          > Unless you want to get really wacky and press fresh flowers between
          > layers of crushed almonds yourself, for period perfumery. But that's
          > pretty hard core...
          >
          > Treasach
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Aelfwyn@...
          > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 2:10 PM
          > Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Massage oils?
          >
          >
          > I was gifted with the items from someone else's unfinished project. I have
          > 16 oz Apricot Kernel Oil, 16 oz Grapeseed Oil, 1 fl oz Jasmine Oil, .5oz
          > Ylang Ylang essential oil and 8 small brown bottles with dropper lids. I
          > THINK the intent was to produce 8 small bottles of scented massage oil.
          > I'd like to make something with all this to present to the Queen for her
          > royal gifting stash. What can/should I do with it? If I am to add the
          > scented oil to the unscented oil, which would be best used and in what
          > ratios?
          > Help, culinary herbs I know, this is out of my bailiwick.
          > Aelfwyn
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for fuel-efficient used
          > cars.
          >


          Pax Christi,
          Sydney
        • Lilinah
          Checking prices on the web, i found... Jasmine -- 1 fluid ounce of pure real jasmine, i.e., jasmine absolute, would cost in the vicinity of $150 US, or likely
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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            Checking prices on the web, i found...

            Jasmine
            -- 1 fluid ounce of pure real jasmine, i.e., jasmine absolute, would
            cost in the vicinity of $150 US, or likely more. I suspect you don't
            have this...
            -- Some vendors put a small amount of jasmine absolute into a natural
            carrier oil, such as jojoba, and that runs around $30 per ounce. If
            you have this, it should be safe.
            -- Or you may have a synthetic, which is much more affordable, but,
            as some people have pointed out, could have a problematic ingredient.

            Ylang ylang
            sometimes called "poorman's jasmine"
            -- 1/2 fluid ounce of pure ylang ylang runs around $15 to $20 US. You
            might have this.
            -- If what you have is synthetic, it, too, could have a problematic ingredient.

            In aromatherapy, both jasmine and ylang ylang are considered to be aphrodisiac.

            Do the essential oils have a brand or vendor name? If so, that could
            help in figuring out which type they are.
            --
            Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
            the persona formerly known as Anahita

            My LibraryThing
            http://www.librarything.com/catalog/lilinah
          • Aelfwyn@aol.com
            Thanks, Urtatim, what I have here is: Now brand Jasmine Oil, 1 fluid oz., sticker on the bottle says $3.95, for external use only, this oil is a combination
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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              Thanks, Urtatim, what I have here is:
              Now brand Jasmine Oil, 1 fluid oz., sticker on the bottle says $3.95, "for external use only, this oil is a combination of 100% natural and synthetic USP oils.".
              Aura Cacia brand aromatherapy Ylang Ylang III Cananga Odorata 100% pure essential oil, .5 fluid oz, "for external use only, dilute properly, add a few drops of oil to your favorite lotion, massage oil or aromatherapy diffuser" price sticker $9.98.
              Neither bottle has ever been opened. So it sounds like I can add at least the Ylang Ylang oil to either the grapeseed oil or the apricot kernel oil for a massage product. Any thoughts on quantity of the essential oil to what quantity of the carrier oil?
              Aelfwyn
               
              In a message dated 7/1/2008 01:13:07 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, lilinah@... writes:

              Checking prices on the web, i found...

              Jasmine
              -- 1 fluid ounce of pure real jasmine, i.e., jasmine absolute, would
              cost in the vicinity of $150 US, or likely more. I suspect you don't
              have this...
              -- Some vendors put a small amount of jasmine absolute into a natural
              carrier oil, such as jojoba, and that runs around $30 per ounce. If
              you have this, it should be safe.
              -- Or you may have a synthetic, which is much more affordable, but,
              as some people have pointed out, could have a problematic ingredient.

              Ylang ylang
              sometimes called "poorman's jasmine"
              -- 1/2 fluid ounce of pure ylang ylang runs around $15 to $20 US. You
              might have this.
              -- If what you have is synthetic, it, too, could have a problematic ingredient.

              In aromatherapy, both jasmine and ylang ylang are considered to be aphrodisiac.

              Do the essential oils have a brand or vendor name? If so, that could
              help in figuring out which type they are.
              --
              Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
              the persona formerly known as Anahita

              My LibraryThing
              http://www.libraryt hing.com/ catalog/lilinah





              Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for fuel-efficient used cars.
            • Amy Provost
              For 1/2 oz of carrier oil, I would only add 1 drop of ylang ylang. Personally, I like lavender in my massage oils. You could add more like 4 drops of that.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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                For 1/2 oz of carrier oil, I would only add 1 drop of ylang ylang.
                Personally, I like lavender in my massage oils.  You could add more like 4 drops of that.
                I've got some arnica oil that I extracted last year if you want to add that to the mix.
                Email me if you do.

                Ameline

                On Tue, Jul 1, 2008 at 2:58 PM, <Aelfwyn@...> wrote:

                Thanks, Urtatim, what I have here is:
                Now brand Jasmine Oil, 1 fluid oz., sticker on the bottle says $3.95, "for external use only, this oil is a combination of 100% natural and synthetic USP oils.".
                Aura Cacia brand aromatherapy Ylang Ylang III Cananga Odorata 100% pure essential oil, .5 fluid oz, "for external use only, dilute properly, add a few drops of oil to your favorite lotion, massage oil or aromatherapy diffuser" price sticker $9.98.
                Neither bottle has ever been opened. So it sounds like I can add at least the Ylang Ylang oil to either the grapeseed oil or the apricot kernel oil for a massage product. Any thoughts on quantity of the essential oil to what quantity of the carrier oil?
                Aelfwyn
                 
                In a message dated 7/1/2008 01:13:07 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, lilinah@... writes:

                Checking prices on the web, i found...

                Jasmine
                -- 1 fluid ounce of pure real jasmine, i.e., jasmine absolute, would
                cost in the vicinity of $150 US, or likely more. I suspect you don't
                have this...
                -- Some vendors put a small amount of jasmine absolute into a natural
                carrier oil, such as jojoba, and that runs around $30 per ounce. If
                you have this, it should be safe.
                -- Or you may have a synthetic, which is much more affordable, but,
                as some people have pointed out, could have a problematic ingredient.

                Ylang ylang
                sometimes called "poorman's jasmine"
                -- 1/2 fluid ounce of pure ylang ylang runs around $15 to $20 US. You
                might have this.
                -- If what you have is synthetic, it, too, could have a problematic ingredient.

                In aromatherapy, both jasmine and ylang ylang are considered to be aphrodisiac.

                Do the essential oils have a brand or vendor name? If so, that could
                help in figuring out which type they are.
                --
                Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
                the persona formerly known as Anahita

                My LibraryThing
                http://www.librarything.com/catalog/lilinah





                Gas prices getting you down? Search AOL Autos for fuel-efficient used cars.



                --
                www.crookedwall.org
                www.bthumbstudios.com
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