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Re: natural dye ESAHS

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  • esahs.association
    Your notion of curry and hair dye is correct! Signed CEO ESAHS Association ... curry was in late period england/france..etc ... mordant, and produces ... safe
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 31, 2007
      Your notion of curry and hair dye is correct!

      Signed CEO ESAHS Association

      --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Lori Hannis <charmed3x3@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I would believe tumeric would be rather period
      > i believe it's mentioned in a "forme of cury"
      >
      > though i could be wrong
      >
      > my theory is this
      >
      > it's found in india...the silk road...india..with how popular
      curry was in late period england/france..etc
      >
      > i'd bet..tumeric would be a period food stuff
      >
      > and dye
      >
      > so....just my tuppence..but
      >
      > anyway
      >
      > Emeline
      >
      > Adhaniá <skyspinner@...> wrote:
      > I have had wonderful luck using turmeric. It needs no
      mordant, and produces
      > a wonderful deep gold colour. As it is a food product, it is very
      safe to
      > use, and will not ruin your pot.
      >
      > Only thing I don't know is how "period" it might be. ;-) Anybody
      know?
      >
      > Adhaniá of Ols
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      >
      > > Greetings gentles,
      > > can anyone give me a list of there most foofproof (im the fool)
      > > dying methods and forumlas for demos? all of my methods are a
      little
      > > too modern and I am trying to use only natural dye stuffs and
      fixes.
      > >
      > > marion nic galen
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass
      > it's learning to dance in the rain.
      > Unknown.
      >
    • Lila Richards
      ... Though I understand it s not a particularly fast dye, which may have made it less likely to be used. However, for a demo it should be fine. You may be able
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
        Lori Hannis wrote:
        > I would believe tumeric would be rather period
        > i believe it's mentioned in a "forme of cury"
        >
        > though i could be wrong
        >
        > my theory is this
        >
        > it's found in india...the silk road...india..with how popular curry was in late period england/france..etc
        >
        > i'd bet..tumeric would be a period food stuff
        >
        > and dye

        Though I understand it's not a particularly fast dye, which may have made it less likely to be used. However, for a demo it should be fine. You may be able to get it in root form rather than powdered (Asian foodstores, perhaps?), which I imagine would be less messy to use.

        Sinech.

        * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
        An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
      • McIsaac & Capnerhurst
        Don t forget to check out the supplier and great info disseminator Dharma Trading. The Laurel handdyer I know has been using them since the 60 s. I
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
          Don't forget to check out the supplier and great info disseminator Dharma Trading.  The Laurel handdyer I know has been using them since the 60's.  I personally just got a shipment of Indigo, madder, henna, and alkanet.  All period.
           
           
          Treasach
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, December 31, 2007 4:27 PM
          Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] natural dye

          Greetings gentles,
          can anyone give me a list of there most foofproof (im the fool)
          dying methods and forumlas for demos? all of my methods are a little
          too modern and I am trying to use only natural dye stuffs and fixes.

          marion nic galen

        • Warrior-Chef
          http://members.regia.org/dyes.htm
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
          • Adhaniá
            Even if you were to use the root, I believe you would still need to grind it finely to use, just as you do madder root. I used a can of turmeric from the
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
              Even if you were to use the root, I believe you would still need to grind it
              finely to use, just as you do madder root.

              I used a can of turmeric from the grocery store spice shelf, already
              powdered. I learned that it does not dissolve in water; it remains in
              suspension, which gave the dyed wool yarn a lovely shaded effect. I left
              the wool to set in the cooled dye bath for 3-4 days because I was busy and
              didn't process it right after dyeing, so that effect was probably enhanced.

              My book "Nature's Colors" states that turmeric is interior light stable, and
              that has proven to be true.

              Adhaniá of Ols


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Lila Richards" <lilar@...>
              To: <SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 4:04
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] natural dye


              > Lori Hannis wrote:
              > > I would believe tumeric would be rather period
              > > i believe it's mentioned in a "forme of cury"
              > >
              > > though i could be wrong
              > >
              > > my theory is this
              > >
              > > it's found in india...the silk road...india..with how popular curry
              was in late period england/france..etc
              > >
              > > i'd bet..tumeric would be a period food stuff
              > >
              > > and dye
              >
              > Though I understand it's not a particularly fast dye, which may have made
              it less likely to be used. However, for a demo it should be fine. You may be
              able to get it in root form rather than powdered (Asian foodstores,
              perhaps?), which I imagine would be less messy to use.
              >
              > Sinech.
              >
              > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
              > An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
              >
              >
              > -------------------------------------------------------------
              > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of
              medieval
              > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any
              health
              > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
              >
              > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
              > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
              > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Lori Hannis
              I wonder about heating the tumeric first?.... boiling it in water before adding it to the dyebath? if that would dissolve better? Emeline Adhaniá
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
                I wonder about heating the tumeric first?....
                 
                boiling it in water before adding it to the dyebath? if that would dissolve better?
                 
                Emeline

                Adhaniá <skyspinner@...> wrote:
                Even if you were to use the root, I believe you would still need to grind it
                finely to use, just as you do madder root.

                I used a can of turmeric from the grocery store spice shelf, already
                powdered. I learned that it does not dissolve in water; it remains in
                suspension, which gave the dyed wool yarn a lovely shaded effect. I left
                the wool to set in the cooled dye bath for 3-4 days because I was busy and
                didn't process it right after dyeing, so that effect was probably enhanced.

                My book "Nature's Colors" states that turmeric is interior light stable, and
                that has proven to be true.

                Adhaniá of Ols

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Lila Richards" <lilar@.... nz>
                To: <SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 4:04
                Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] natural dye

                > Lori Hannis wrote:
                > > I would believe tumeric would be rather period
                > > i believe it's mentioned in a "forme of cury"
                > >
                > > though i could be wrong
                > >
                > > my theory is this
                > >
                > > it's found in india...the silk road...india. .with how popular curry
                was in late period england/france. .etc
                > >
                > > i'd bet..tumeric would be a period food stuff
                > >
                > > and dye
                >
                > Though I understand it's not a particularly fast dye, which may have made
                it less likely to be used. However, for a demo it should be fine. You may be
                able to get it in root form rather than powdered (Asian foodstores,
                perhaps?), which I imagine would be less messy to use.
                >
                > Sinech.
                >
                > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
                > An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
                >
                >
                > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of
                medieval
                > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any
                health
                > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
                >
                > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.Medieval Mart.com/
                > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
                > [Email to SCA-Herbalist- unsubscribe@ egroups.com to leave this list]
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >




                Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass
                it's learning to dance in the rain.
                                                      Unknown.
              • Lila Richards
                ... Probably not, since it s a dried, powdered root. However, if you can find/make a bag with a fine enough weave, and put the turmeric in that before adding
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 1, 2008
                  Lori Hannis wrote:
                  > I wonder about heating the tumeric first?....
                  >
                  > boiling it in water before adding it to the dyebath? if that would dissolve better?

                  Probably not, since it's a dried, powdered root. However, if you can find/make a bag with a fine enough weave, and put the turmeric in that before adding it to the water, it could help; likewise, you could strain it after you've obtained the colour dyebath you want, and before putting in the fibre. Getting a fine enough strainer could be tricky, though you could place a fine cloth in a strainer (or even a coffee filter?) and do it that way. On the other hand, if you use grated turmeric root, the bag method would work, and be simpler. Best of luck, and I'd love to hear how it all works out.

                  Sinech.


                  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
                  An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
                • Carowyn Silveroak
                  Greetings, I ve found that using alcohol to extract turmeric color works better than simmering it in water. Though when working with the ground form,
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 2, 2008
                     
                    Greetings,
                     
                    I've found that using alcohol to extract turmeric color works better than simmering it in water.  Though when working with the ground form, sometimes it becomes a strange mass of jelly-like jiggly stuff, which is...um.....bizarre.  I've been meaning to pull out my soap forms to see if the jiggly mass sets up at some point.....
                     
                    Turmeric also gives blood red if you shift the pH really hard with the addition of thiox.  Really freaky the first time, it really looked like the dyebath suddenly started bleeding!
                     
                    Ground cinnamon does the same jiggly-mass thing, it's really weird.  I prefer to buy some cinnamon sticks and break them up with a pliers and toss them in the pot (I've had one pot boiling all through the holiday season, for potpourri as well as a dye bath), but I was given a jarful of 15-year-old ground cinnamon from someone's kitchen, so I thought I'd give it a go.  It also gave a different color in the dyebath, which I found interesting!
                     
                    -Carowyn
                     
                    >I wonder about heating the tumeric first?....
                  • Lauren Grover
                    ... I m not sure what thiox is, but Indians use turmeric to make traditional bindi, the red dots on the foreheads, by adding chuna, which is pickling lime. I
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 2, 2008
                      >
                      > Turmeric also gives blood red if you shift the pH really hard with the
                      > addition of thiox. Really freaky the first time, it really looked
                      > like the dyebath suddenly started bleeding!


                      I'm not sure what thiox is, but Indians use turmeric to make traditional
                      bindi, the red dots on the foreheads, by adding chuna, which is pickling
                      lime. I have no references for this whatsoever, but it may be a period
                      method.
                      Ghazalah
                      >
                    • EDU.SUB.ABUSE. & Human Service ASS. SUB.A
                      Yes! My father currently takes it prescribed by his doctor. For example, it also acts as a blood thinner to allow the body to flow blood through heart arties
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jan 2, 2008
                        "Yes!' My father currently takes it prescribed by his doctor. For example, it also acts as a blood thinner to allow the body to flow blood through heart arties better.
                        Now that comment is right on the money.
                        Smart Smart Ms. Grover. 

                        Lauren Grover <hennadancer@...> wrote:

                        >
                        > Turmeric also gives blood red if you shift the pH really hard with the
                        > addition of thiox. Really freaky the first time, it really looked
                        > like the dyebath suddenly started bleeding!

                        I'm not sure what thiox is, but Indians use turmeric to make traditional
                        bindi, the red dots on the foreheads, by adding chuna, which is pickling
                        lime. I have no references for this whatsoever, but it may be a period
                        method.
                        Ghazalah
                        >



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                      • EDU.SUB.ABUSE. & Human Service ASS. SUB.A
                        Yes the alcohol does extract collor I remember my grandmother using a small amount when she dyed our faded blue jeans in the early 1970 s. To end the alcohol
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jan 2, 2008
                          Yes the alcohol does extract collor I remember my grandmother using a small  amount when she  dyed our faded blue jeans in the early 1970"s. To end the alcohol also stops color action like hydrogen Peroxide in hair coloring porcesses.
                           
                          Nice Ms. Silveroak

                          Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@...> wrote:
                           
                          Greetings,
                           
                          I've found that using alcohol to extract turmeric color works better than simmering it in water.  Though when working with the ground form, sometimes it becomes a strange mass of jelly-like jiggly stuff, which is...um..... bizarre.  I've been meaning to pull out my soap forms to see if the jiggly mass sets up at some point.....
                           
                          Turmeric also gives blood red if you shift the pH really hard with the addition of thiox.  Really freaky the first time, it really looked like the dyebath suddenly started bleeding!
                           
                          Ground cinnamon does the same jiggly-mass thing, it's really weird.  I prefer to buy some cinnamon sticks and break them up with a pliers and toss them in the pot (I've had one pot boiling all through the holiday season, for potpourri as well as a dye bath), but I was given a jarful of 15-year-old ground cinnamon from someone's kitchen, so I thought I'd give it a go.  It also gave a different color in the dyebath, which I found interesting!
                           
                          -Carowyn
                           
                          >I wonder about heating the tumeric first?....


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                        • Adhaniá
                          I pretty much did that, as I brought the water to hot before adding the powdered turmeric. I believe that it simply is not soluble in water. But the question
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jan 2, 2008
                            I pretty much did that, as I brought the water to hot before adding the powdered turmeric.
                             
                            I believe that it simply is not soluble in water.
                             
                            But the question is still open.....anyone wanna test this out?  :-)

                            Adhaniá of Ols
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 4:05
                            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] natural dye

                            I wonder about heating the tumeric first?....
                             
                            boiling it in water before adding it to the dyebath? if that would dissolve better?
                             
                            Emeline

                            Adhaniá <skyspinner@...> wrote:
                            Even if you were to use the root, I believe you would still need to grind it
                            finely to use, just as you do madder root.

                            I used a can of turmeric from the grocery store spice shelf, already
                            powdered. I learned that it does not dissolve in water; it remains in
                            suspension, which gave the dyed wool yarn a lovely shaded effect. I left
                            the wool to set in the cooled dye bath for 3-4 days because I was busy and
                            didn't process it right after dyeing, so that effect was probably enhanced.

                            My book "Nature's Colors" states that turmeric is interior light stable, and
                            that has proven to be true.

                            Adhaniá of Ols

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "Lila Richards" <lilar@.... nz>
                            To: <SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com>
                            Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 4:04
                            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] natural dye

                            > Lori Hannis wrote:
                            > > I would believe tumeric would be rather period
                            > > i believe it's mentioned in a "forme of cury"
                            > >
                            > > though i could be wrong
                            > >
                            > > my theory is this
                            > >
                            > > it's found in india...the silk road...india. .with how popular curry
                            was in late period england/france. .etc
                            > >
                            > > i'd bet..tumeric would be a period food stuff
                            > >
                            > > and dye
                            >
                            > Though I understand it's not a particularly fast dye, which may have made
                            it less likely to be used. However, for a demo it should be fine. You may be
                            able to get it in root form rather than powdered (Asian foodstores,
                            perhaps?), which I imagine would be less messy to use.
                            >
                            > Sinech.
                            >
                            > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
                            > An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil - The Truth Against the World
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
                            > SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of
                            medieval
                            > and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any
                            health
                            > information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.
                            >
                            > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.Medieval Mart.com/
                            > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
                            > [Email to SCA-Herbalist- unsubscribe@ egroups.com to leave this list]
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >




                            Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass
                            it's learning to dance in the rain.
                                                                  Unknown.
                          • Adhaniá
                            He takes turmeric or thiox or both? How much and how often? Adhaniá of Ols ... Yes! My father currently takes it prescribed by his doctor. For example, it
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jan 3, 2008
                              He takes turmeric or thiox or both?  How much and how often?
                               
                              Adhaniá of Ols
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----

                              "Yes!' My father currently takes it prescribed by his doctor. For example, it also acts as a blood thinner to allow the body to flow blood through heart arties better.
                              Now that comment is right on the money.
                              Smart Smart Ms. Grover. 

                              Lauren Grover <> wrote:
                              >
                              > Turmeric also gives blood red if you shift the pH really hard with the
                              > addition of thiox. Really freaky the first time, it really looked
                              > like the dyebath suddenly started bleeding!

                              I'm not sure what thiox is, but Indians use turmeric to make traditional
                              bindi, the red dots on the foreheads, by adding chuna, which is pickling
                              lime. I have no references for this whatsoever, but it may be a period
                              method.
                              Ghazalah
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