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Apothacary matters

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  • Jamie Picon
    I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are applied for days
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 21, 2000
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      I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on
      the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are
      applied for days at a time to consume necrotic tissue and rejuvenated
      healthy tissue. This, like leeches is re - emerging in modern medicine,
      but I can't seem to find any reference to period use of maggots. Does
      anyone have any knowledge?

      In Service,
      Jacob Simon
      --
      If Gore can't beat a worthless buffoon with a poor track record, then he
      has only himself to blame. ---- Ralph Nader
    • Verdaeni@aol.com
      this was the period use of maggots. by removing the dead flesh they actually reduce the change of anaerobic disease like gangrene. In a message dated Tue, 21
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 21, 2000
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        this was the period use of maggots. by removing the dead flesh they actually
        reduce the change of anaerobic disease like gangrene.



        In a message dated Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:29:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, Jamie
        Picon <hefiji@...> writes:

        << I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on
        the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are
        applied for days at a time to consume necrotic tissue and rejuvenated
        healthy tissue. This, like leeches is re - emerging in modern medicine,
        but I can't seem to find any reference to period use of maggots. Does
        anyone have any knowledge?

        In Service,
        Jacob Simon
        --
        If Gore can't beat a worthless buffoon with a poor track record, then he
        has only himself to blame. ---- Ralph Nader




        Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/

        Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
        [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]

        >>
      • Bean,Christina
        It was not so much a deliberate period use of maggots as an accidental one. If you look through books on the treatment of wounds in battles you will find
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 21, 2000
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          It was not so much a deliberate period use of maggots as an accidental one.
          If you look through books on the treatment of wounds in battles you will
          find reference to maggots helping to clean out wounds and make them heal
          better.
          The trouble is of course that there are many different sorts of maggots and
          some can actually eat healthy tissue as well as unhealthy tissue. It was
          usually blind luck that the right sort got into an uncleaned wound.
          Maggots were much more common once you got much larger scale wars later than
          the medieval period. This is when you had people left on the field for very
          long periods of time before they were recovered and tended, then once they
          were being looked after they were in nasty rooms with no sanitation and all
          the rest. A perfect breeding ground for maggots.
          Caristiona
          Lochac

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jamie Picon [mailto:hefiji@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2000 3:39 AM
          To: SCA-Herbalist@egroups.com; Carolingia List
          Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Apothacary matters


          I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on
          the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are
          applied for days at a time to consume necrotic tissue and rejuvenated
          healthy tissue. This, like leeches is re - emerging in modern medicine,
          but I can't seem to find any reference to period use of maggots. Does
          anyone have any knowledge?

          In Service,
          Jacob Simon
          --
          If Gore can't beat a worthless buffoon with a poor track record, then he
          has only himself to blame. ---- Ralph Nader




          Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/

          Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
          [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]
        • Verdaeni@aol.com
          it would be just my luck to end up with the wrong kind of maggots!!! ... than
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 21, 2000
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            it would be just my luck to end up with the wrong kind of maggots!!!

            > It was not so much a deliberate period use of maggots as an accidental one.
            > If you look through books on the treatment of wounds in battles you will
            > find reference to maggots helping to clean out wounds and make them heal
            > better.
            > The trouble is of course that there are many different sorts of maggots and
            > some can actually eat healthy tissue as well as unhealthy tissue. It was
            > usually blind luck that the right sort got into an uncleaned wound.
            > Maggots were much more common once you got much larger scale wars later
            than
            > the medieval period. This is when you had people left on the field for very
            > long periods of time before they were recovered and tended, then once they
            > were being looked after they were in nasty rooms with no sanitation and all
            > the rest. A perfect breeding ground for maggots.
            > Caristiona
            > Lochac
            >
          • Nancy Upson
            ... I have actually done and taught the use of leech therapy, kinda sqirmy but it saved a some toes on a crushed foot. the saliva acts as a blood thinner, like
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 23, 2000
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              On 21 Nov 00, at 16:17, Verdaeni@... wrote:

              > this was the period use of maggots. by removing the dead flesh they actually
              > reduce the change of anaerobic disease like gangrene.
              >
              >
              >
              > In a message dated Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:29:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, Jamie
              > Picon <hefiji@...> writes:
              >
              > << I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on
              > the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are
              > applied for days at a time to consume necrotic tissue and rejuvenated
              > healthy tissue. This, like leeches is re - emerging in modern medicine,

              I have actually done and taught the use of leech therapy, kinda
              sqirmy but it saved a some toes on a crushed foot. the saliva acts
              as a blood thinner, like heparin. It was cool, and the patient was
              cool about it. As far as Maggots, I have seen it work also, not
              done intentionally, a elderly diabetic came in , in very unsanitary
              conditions, with large gapping ulcers in his leg. When i took down
              the last layer of the dressing i saw a the dressing wiggling, last
              layer off,m a leg full of maggots. I wound it self was clean and pink
              with no infection. So Poo on modern medicine some times. That
              leg would have been history.

              Lady Hilken
              R.N. in real life
            • annys wolf of wharram percy
              I just finished reading a book called, Honey, Mud, Maggots and other Medical Marvels The Science Behind Folk Remedies and Old Wives Tales . There is a
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 25, 2000
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                I just finished reading a book called, 'Honey, Mud, Maggots and other
                Medical Marvels The Science Behind Folk Remedies and Old Wives' Tales'.
                There is a chapter on the use of maggots in medicine to eat the dead tissue
                at the wound site. Very interesting read. At the back there are
                references. Unfortunately, there aren't any references to any medieval
                uses, but some of the references may have them.
                Annys

                > From: "Nancy Upson" <Nancy@...>
                > Reply-To: SCA-Herbalist@egroups.com
                > Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 08:57:22 -0500
                > To: SCA-Herbalist@egroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Apothacary matters
                >
                > On 21 Nov 00, at 16:17, Verdaeni@... wrote:
                >
                >> this was the period use of maggots. by removing the dead flesh they actually
                >> reduce the change of anaerobic disease like gangrene.
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> In a message dated Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:29:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, Jamie
                >> Picon <hefiji@...> writes:
                >>
                >> << I was listening to National Public Radio and they were doing a report on
                >> the current use of maggots in medicine. The use being that they are
                >> applied for days at a time to consume necrotic tissue and rejuvenated
                >> healthy tissue. This, like leeches is re - emerging in modern medicine,
                >
                > I have actually done and taught the use of leech therapy, kinda
                > sqirmy but it saved a some toes on a crushed foot. the saliva acts
                > as a blood thinner, like heparin. It was cool, and the patient was
                > cool about it. As far as Maggots, I have seen it work also, not
                > done intentionally, a elderly diabetic came in , in very unsanitary
                > conditions, with large gapping ulcers in his leg. When i took down
                > the last layer of the dressing i saw a the dressing wiggling, last
                > layer off,m a leg full of maggots. I wound it self was clean and pink
                > with no infection. So Poo on modern medicine some times. That
                > leg would have been history.
                >
                > Lady Hilken
                > R.N. in real life
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
                >
                > Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
                > [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]
                >
                >
                >
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