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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Question About Dayflower Toxicity

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  • carolyn millsap
    Hi, I don t now if this went through...sending again.... Hi, I hope this helps!!! Fand http://www.mentata.com/ds/retrieve/mesh/descriptor/D034822
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 31, 2007
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      Hi, I don't now if this went through...sending again....
       
      Hi, I hope this helps!!!
       
      Fand
       
       
       
       
       
      Known here a Asiatic Dayflower, it is extremely invasive; but at least it is edible. The young leaves and stems can be added to salads or boiled for 10 minutes and served with butter.
       
       
      The Asiatic Dayflower (Commelina communis) is a common weed in the northeastern United States. It grows happily in fairly urban environments, often colonizing neglected gardens. It can often be seen growing among garden periwinkle plants, perhaps because the superficial sim
      The Asiatic Dayflower (Commelina communis) is a common weed in the northeastern United States. It grows happily in fairly urban environments, often colonizing neglected gardens. It can often be seen growing among garden periwinkle plants, perhaps because the superficial similarity of their stems and leaves makes it harder to weed out.
      Several species, especially Commelina benghalensis, are eaten as a leaf vegetable in Southeast Asia and Africa.
      It grows in places with some sun exposure, especially with partial shade or light shade. The flowers are medium blue and the foliage evergreen.
      Plants in this genus are attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. They have average watering needs and should be watered regularly in order to have consistently moist soil, but should not be overwatered, nor should the soil be allowed to dry out between waterings.
      ilarity of their stems and leaves makes it harder to weed out.
      Several species, especially Commelina benghalensis, are eaten as a leaf vegetable in Southeast Asia and Africa.
      It grows in places with some sun exposure, especially with partial shade or light shade. The flowers are medium blue and the foliage evergreen.
      Plants in this genus are attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds. They have average watering needs and should be watered regularly in order to have consistently moist soil, but should not be overwatered, nor should the soil be allowed to dry out between waterings.




      Amy Provost <sparrowhawk9@...> wrote:
      If it's spiderwort we're talking, then it will be okay.  Not that I would choose to eat it myself, but it is not poisonous.  I don't recognize Commina or dayflower.

      Watcha going to do with all that mint tea Carowyn?  I have a recipe for an all purpose cleaner you could make out of that if you're interested..

      Ameline

      On 10/30/07, Tallon Crystalweaver <t_crystalweaver@ yahoo.com> wrote:
      As far as I can find out it not toxic. not sure what kind you go but
      I looked up Blue Spiderwort (Commelina coelestis) and cant find
      anything about it other that it weedie groungcover
      maybe some else can chime it on it

      YIS
      Tallon Crystalweaver

      --- Carowyn Silveroak <silveroak@juno. com> wrote:

      >
      >
      > Greetings,
      >
      > Right before the frost hit 2 nights ago, I harvested the last mint
      > in my
      > garden and brewed up some huge pots of tea. I tried to sort all
      > extraneous herbage, but one strand of dayflower (Commina species)
      > snuck
      > in.
      >
      > I looked today, but couldn't find any information about its
      > toxicity.
      > Does anyone know?
      >
      > It's one strand in about 3-4 gallons of liquid, but I'd still like
      > to
      > know before I go drinking it.....
      >
      > -Carowyn
      >

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    • Dianna Haught
      I don t know about all herbs, but it would make sense. I read somewhere that only something like 70% of people who use stevia say it tastes sweet. The rest
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 31, 2007
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        I don't know about all herbs, but it would make sense. I read somewhere that only something like 70% of people who use stevia say it tastes sweet. The rest say it tastes like grass or tastes "green". I fall in the latter catagory.
        Avacyn


        >I've never succeeded in making tea from anything I've grown
        >(including lemon balm and peppermint) that DIDN'T taste like grass.
        >I'm beginning to think there might be a human genetic component --
        >like cilantro tasting like soap to some of us (like me). Anyone have
        >information on this?
        >
        >Johanna
      • carolyn millsap
        Hi everyone, I have made many herbal teas from my garden including 7 different types of mint, chamomile, St Johns wort, many more. Some were rather bitter,
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 1, 2007
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          Hi everyone, I have made many herbal teas from my garden including 7 different types of mint, chamomile, St Johns wort, many more.  Some were rather bitter, that's when I used the stevia from the garden.  I found the taste to be sweet.  It may have somthing to do with how its brewed.  I try to take freash leaves and smash them into a pultice, releasing the oils and flavors directly. 
           
          Fand

          Dianna Haught <avacyn@...> wrote:
          I don't know about all herbs, but it would make sense. I read somewhere that only something like 70% of people who use stevia say it tastes sweet. The rest say it tastes like grass or tastes "green". I fall in the latter catagory.
          Avacyn

          >I've never succeeded in making tea from anything I've grown
          >(including lemon balm and peppermint) that DIDN'T taste like grass.
          >I'm beginning to think there might be a human genetic component --
          >like cilantro tasting like soap to some of us (like me). Anyone have
          >information on this?
          >
          >Johanna




          God Bless America
           
          If you can't support our troops, feel free to get in front of them...
           
           
          Carolyn

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        • Amy Provost
          Chamomile becomes a bitter is brewed for more than 6 minutes. Ameline ... -- www.crookedwall.org www.bthumbstudios.com
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 1, 2007
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            Chamomile becomes a bitter is brewed for more than 6 minutes.

            Ameline

            On 11/1/07, carolyn millsap <fandmaeve@... > wrote:

            Hi everyone, I have made many herbal teas from my garden including 7 different types of mint, chamomile, St Johns wort, many more.  Some were rather bitter, that's when I used the stevia from the garden.  I found the taste to be sweet.  It may have somthing to do with how its brewed.  I try to take freash leaves and smash them into a pultice, releasing the oils and flavors directly. 
             
            Fand

            Dianna Haught <avacyn@...> wrote:
            I don't know about all herbs, but it would make sense. I read somewhere that only something like 70% of people who use stevia say it tastes sweet. The rest say it tastes like grass or tastes "green". I fall in the latter catagory.
            Avacyn

            >I've never succeeded in making tea from anything I've grown
            >(including lemon balm and peppermint) that DIDN'T taste like grass.
            >I'm beginning to think there might be a human genetic component --
            >like cilantro tasting like soap to some of us (like me). Anyone have
            >information on this?
            >
            >Johanna




            God Bless America
             
            If you can't support our troops, feel free to get in front of them...
             
             
            Carolyn

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com




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            www.bthumbstudios.com
          • Carowyn Silveroak
            Greetings, ... *rummages through the backlog in the inbox* Yes, it did go through, thank you! ... It did, because I drank it! ;-) -Carowyn
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 19, 2007
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              Greetings,
               
              >Hi, I don't now if this went through...sending again....
               
              *rummages through the backlog in the inbox*  Yes, it did go through, thank you!
               
              >Hi, I hope this helps!!!
               
              It did, because I drank it!  ;-)
               
              -Carowyn
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