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Drawing savve

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  • Squire Morgan
    I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save? (Spelling and right name?) I remember my grandmother using it on us when we where little but she is
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 7, 2007
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      I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save?
      (Spelling and
      right name?)

      I remember my grandmother using it on us when we where
      little but she is
      since left us.
      Ie: it would help pull a splinter to the surface so
      you can pull it out..

      Thanks,


      Morgan




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    • steffan@pobox.com
      ... Or, at least, such was the urban (rural?) legend. Drawing salve is Ichthammol Ointment. Actually it s a mild antiseptic. It s commercially available as
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 7, 2007
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        > I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save...it would > help pull a splinter to the surface so
        > you can pull it out.

        Or, at least, such was the urban (rural?) legend. "Drawing salve" is Ichthammol Ointment. Actually it's a mild antiseptic. It's commercially available as such in 10% and 20% strengths. It may be hard to find, but some pharmacies (like mine) still carry it. "Boil-Ease" is a branded product that contains ichthammol.

        --- Steve Mesnick, RPh
        (Steffan ap Kennydd thinks you just need a good bleeding <g>).
      • Betty Pillsbury
        Well, my grandfather made a drawing salve, which would pull splinters out, and it did NOT contain ichthammol. We always put it on a bandage and applied the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 7, 2007
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          Well, my grandfather made a drawing salve, which would pull splinters out, and it did NOT contain ichthammol.  We always put it on a bandage and applied the bandage to the area overnight and the next morning, the splinter would be out.  As I now make it and sell it, I won’t tell exact ingredients, but will tell you it has rosin in it.  Many a family had variations of this theme.  It also is great for minor wounds as a healing ointment. 

           

          Betty

          www.GreenSpiralHerbs.com

          www.bettypillsbury.com

           

           

           


          > I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save...it would > help
          pull a splinter to the surface so
          > you can pull it out.

          Or, at least, such was the urban (rural?) legend. "Drawing salve" is Ichthammol Ointment. Actually it's a mild antiseptic. It's commercially available as such in 10% and 20% strengths. It may be hard to find, but some pharmacies (like mine) still carry it. "Boil-Ease" is a branded product that contains ichthammol.

          --- Steve Mesnick, RPh
          (Steffan ap Kennydd thinks you just need a good bleeding <g>).


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        • Amy Provost
          A poultice of plantain would do that. Ameline ... -- www.crookedwall.org www.bthumbstudios.com
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 7, 2007
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            A poultice of plantain would do that.

            Ameline

            On 7/7/07, Squire Morgan <squire_morgan@...> wrote:

            I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save?
            (Spelling and
            right name?)

            I remember my grandmother using it on us when we where
            little but she is
            since left us.
            Ie: it would help pull a splinter to the surface so
            you can pull it out..

            Thanks,

            Morgan

            __________________________________________________________Ready for the edge of your seat?
            Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.
            http://tv.yahoo.com/




            --
            www.crookedwall.org
            www.bthumbstudios.com
          • julian wilson
            Amy Provost wrote: A poultice of plantain would do that. Ameline wrote:
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 8, 2007
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               Amy Provost <sparrowhawk9@...> wrote:
              A poultice of plantain would do that.

              Ameline

              <On 7/7/07, Squire Morgan <squire_morgan@ yahoo.com> wrote:
              I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing saLve?
              (Spelling and right name?)>

              I remember my grandmother using it on us when we where little but she is since left us.  Ie: it would help pull a splinter to the surface so you can pull it out..

               
               
              QUERY
              Sally Wilson, an SRN for the last 45 years [aka "Madame Alys Vitel de Ploubazlanec', 1490's Household Chatelaine to Messire Matthew Baker, and amatuer Herbalist"] - asks
              "Are we talking the medieval ancestor of modern 'Mag. Sulph' ointment here? Did the various plants suggested for this purpose contain the chemicals present in equivalent modern ointments?"

              .


            • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
              ... Wow! Thank you, Steffan. That makes a lot of sense. I read somewhere that any warm poultice that softens the skin can be used when trying to get out a
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 9, 2007
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                > > I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save...it would > help pull a splinter to the surface so
                > > you can pull it out.
                >
                > Or, at least, such was the urban (rural?) legend. "Drawing salve" is Ichthammol Ointment. Actually it's a mild antiseptic. It's commercially available as such in 10% and 20% strengths. It may be hard to find, but some pharmacies (like mine) still carry it. "Boil-Ease" is a branded product that contains ichthammol.

                Wow! Thank you, Steffan. That makes a lot of sense.

                I read somewhere that any warm poultice that softens the skin can be
                used when trying to get out a stubborn splinter, because it makes the
                skin easier to manipulate. For boils, apparently applying moist heat
                brings it to a head sooner so it will be drainable. So, I can see the
                idea of a warm poultice of something that produces mucilage-like
                substance (plantain, flax seed) to make it easier to get the splinter
                out-- though I suspect soaking the part in warm water and applying
                antibacterial ointment would be the modern folk equivalents.

                --
                -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
                "I thought you might need rescuing . . . We have a bunch of professors
                wandering around who need students." -- Dan Guernsey
              • Cheri or Anne
                Vermont Country Store sells it, and I have some. It does work on splinters. Anne
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 9, 2007
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                  Vermont Country Store sells it, and I have some.  It does work on splinters.
                   
                  Anne
                   

                  Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne@...> wrote:
                  > > I was wondering if anyone a recipe for a drawing save...it would > help pull a splinter to the surface so
                  > > you can pull it out.
                  >
                  > Or, at least, such was the urban (rural?) legend. "Drawing salve" is Ichthammol Ointment. Actually it's a mild antiseptic. It's commercially available as such in 10% and 20% strengths. It may be hard to find, but some pharmacies (like mine) still carry it. "Boil-Ease" is a branded product that contains ichthammol.

                  Wow! Thank you, Steffan. That makes a lot of sense.

                  I read somewhere that any warm poultice that softens the skin can be
                  used when trying to get out a stubborn splinter, because it makes the
                  skin easier to manipulate. For boils, apparently applying moist heat
                  brings it to a head sooner so it will be drainable. So, I can see the
                  idea of a warm poultice of something that produces mucilage-like
                  substance (plantain, flax seed) to make it easier to get the splinter
                  out-- though I suspect soaking the part in warm water and applying
                  antibacterial ointment would be the modern folk equivalents.

                  --
                  -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@fiedlerfamily .net
                  "I thought you might need rescuing . . . We have a bunch of professors
                  wandering around who need students." -- Dan Guernsey



                  Go softly and gently for those you meet here will be
                  those you know hereafter."


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                • steffan@pobox.com
                  ... I read somewhere that any warm poultice that softens the skin can be ... Yes, I think that s a very good analysis of the actual mechanism here.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 9, 2007
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                    > Jadwiga Zajaczkowa wrote:
                    I read somewhere that any warm poultice that softens the skin can be
                    > used when trying to get out a stubborn splinter, because it makes the
                    > skin easier to manipulate. For boils, apparently applying moist heat
                    > brings it to a head sooner so it will be drainable. So, I can see the
                    > idea of a warm poultice of something that produces mucilage-like
                    > substance (plantain, flax seed) to make it easier to get the splinter
                    > out-- though I suspect soaking the part in warm water and applying
                    > antibacterial ointment would be the modern folk equivalents.

                    Yes, I think that's a very good analysis of the actual mechanism here.

                    --- Steffan
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