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Favorite Herb Books

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  • Sharon Gordon
    I ve been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs. I d like to learn about more different herbs though and more
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 11, 2007
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      I've been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs.  I'd like to learn about more different herbs though and more specifics on using them.  Does anyone have recommendations?  I am interested in cooking uses, medical uses, and other useful functions such as making dyes.
       
      Modern and period items are both of interest as I like to cross check the older info.  Often the newer books help me understand how the older recipe or remedy works.
       
      Sharon
    • Alyson
      I have several books on Herbs. One of my favorites is an herb encyclopedia another, though very simple is Earl Mendells (sp?) Herb Bible. Other than my
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 11, 2007
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        I have several books on Herbs. One of my favorites is an herb encyclopedia another, though very simple is Earl Mendells (sp?) Herb Bible. Other than my Encyclopedia of Herbs, I haven't found one that has everything. I'm just getting into dyeing soI can't recommend one on that.
        Kemper 
         


         

            "We all straddle the abyss. If we never look down, we will never know who we are"-Oscar Wilde


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Sharon Gordon <gordonse@...>
        To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, June 11, 2007 8:52:27 AM
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

        I've been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs.  I'd like to learn about more different herbs though and more specifics on using them.  Does anyone have recommendations?  I am interested in cooking uses, medical uses, and other useful functions such as making dyes.
         
        Modern and period items are both of interest as I like to cross check the older info.  Often the newer books help me understand how the older recipe or remedy works.
         
        Sharon

      • jack hollandbeck
        Howdy. I have found a couple of books to be quite helpful, one of which I learned about from this site: History of Food by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, and
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 11, 2007
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          Howdy. I have found a couple of books to be quite helpful, one of which I learned about from this site: "History of Food" by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, and Stephen Pollington's "Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healing."

          You might also check out these websites for historical sources/interpretations.

          LacusCurtius: Into the Roman World (http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/home.html)

          Miercinga Theod (http://www.ealdriht.org/)

          Internet Ancient History Sourcebook (http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html)


          These should keep you busy for about 6 months. lol Good luck and have fun.
          Jack



          To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
          From: gordonse@...
          Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:52:27 -0400
          Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

          I've been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs.  I'd like to learn about more different herbs though and more specifics on using them.  Does anyone have recommendations?  I am interested in cooking uses, medical uses, and other useful functions such as making dyes.
           
          Modern and period items are both of interest as I like to cross check the older info.  Often the newer books help me understand how the older recipe or remedy works.
           
          Sharon


          Change is good. See what's different about Windows Live Hotmail. Check it out!
        • Alyson
          Stephen Pollington s boook is a good one (I own it); however, the manscripts from which it is based upon, Bald s Leeceboc, the Laguna mss, and a few others
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 11, 2007
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            Stephen Pollington's boook is a good one (I own it); however, the manscripts from which it is based upon, Bald's Leeceboc, the Laguna mss, and a few others have both archic not modern knowledge although some of qualities of the herbs are the same. While it will give you a great understanding of the history behind many of the herbs, their remedies need to be crossed reference before use. Not to mention that we do not usually use any of the charms, iconography, and astrologcal methods anymore. Stephen Pollington's books are usually translated and edited by himself. I've done some translattions myself and some of the coincide and others do not. He is not a historical herbologist, Pollington is an expert of the Anglo-Saxon language. Take his information and cross-reference-I have found discrepancies between his book and the Agnus Castus (another OE manuscript) and other recent books.
             
            Kemper
             
            Sorry about the spelling the keyboad I am using sticks.
             
             


             

                "We all straddle the abyss. If we never look down, we will never know who we are"-Oscar Wilde


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...>
            To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, June 11, 2007 12:55:03 PM
            Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

            Howdy. I have found a couple of books to be quite helpful, one of which I learned about from this site: "History of Food" by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, and Stephen Pollington's "Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healing."

            You might also check out these websites for historical sources/interpretat ions.

            LacusCurtius: Into the Roman World (http://penelope. uchicago. edu/Thayer/ E/Roman/home. html)

            Miercinga Theod (http://www.ealdriht .org/)

            Internet Ancient History Sourcebook (http://www.fordham. edu/halsall/ ancient/asbook. html)


            These should keep you busy for about 6 months. lol Good luck and have fun.
            Jack



            To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
            From: gordonse@one. net
            Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:52:27 -0400
            Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

            I've been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs.  I'd like to learn about more different herbs though and more specifics on using them.  Does anyone have recommendations?  I am interested in cooking uses, medical uses, and other useful functions such as making dyes.
             
            Modern and period items are both of interest as I like to cross check the older info.  Often the newer books help me understand how the older recipe or remedy works.
             
            Sharon

            Change is good. See what's different about Windows Live Hotmail. Check it out!

          • MUSICA88@AOL.COM
            Aren t charms and astrological correspondences period, though? ************************************** See what s free at http://www.aol.com.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 12, 2007
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              Aren't charms and astrological correspondences period, though?




              See what's free at AOL.com.
            • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
              ... On the other hand, it s an excellent resource for the study of Medieval herbalism. Ladies and Gents, while I agree that we should check recipes before we
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 13, 2007
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                > Stephen Pollington's boook is a good one (I own it); however, the
                >manscripts from which it is based upon, Bald's Leeceboc, the Laguna
                >mss, and a few others have both archic not modern knowledge although
                >some of qualities of the herbs are the same. While it will give you a
                >great understanding of the history behind many of the herbs, their
                >remedies need to be crossed reference before use.

                On the other hand, it's an excellent resource for the study of Medieval
                herbalism.

                Ladies and Gents, while I agree that we should check recipes before we
                try something in real life, I'd like to see this list concentrate
                on discussing, researching and trying period herbal practices (the ones
                that are safe, at least).

                One of the things I've found disconcerting is that there is a lot of
                misinformation about medieval use of herbs being circulated in modern
                herbalist circles. (For instance, it is widely believed among modern
                herbalists that the Catholic Church declared anyone who used herbs to
                heal to be a witch, a position which cannot be supported based on any
                reliable documentation I have found...)

                I think the only way to find out more about the history of herbalism is
                to do the research and take advantage of our SCA and historical
                recreation habits to try out some of the recipes and practices we find.

                -- Jadwiga
              • MUSICA88@AOL.COM
                Yes, yes, herbs were medicine. There were no chemical reproductions, yet. Have you checked out the work of H of Bingen? Detailed descriptions of remedies.
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 13, 2007
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                  Yes, yes, herbs were medicine.  There were no chemical reproductions, yet.  Have you checked out the work of H of Bingen?  Detailed descriptions of remedies.  she was a healer sanctioned by the church.  I was turned on to Hidegarde for her music, originally.  What a fascinating  and outstanding character she was!!!!  k




                  See what's free at AOL.com.
                • Carowyn Silveroak
                  Slight diversion, though Herbalists and Apothecaries are related..... ... Some, and it varies on which time and place you re studying. Up at Penn State s main
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 13, 2007
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                    Slight diversion, though Herbalists and Apothecaries are related.....
                     
                    >Aren't charms and astrological correspondences period, though?
                     
                    Some, and it varies on which time and place you're studying.
                     
                    Up at Penn State's main campus, they have a collection of rare books - many of which are either exact facsimiles or direct copies of medieval books.  One of which is an early Anglo-Saxon herbal, which I'm going to be looking at again.....*digs out notes*  "An eleventh century Anglo-Saxon illustrated Miscellany"  It gives charms that were to be said for each plant it described, but the charms had been altered from "pagan" to "Christian" by substituting "God" for the other gods' names.  We're allowed to take pictures, so all of us who are going back in 2 weeks are charging our digital cameras.....
                     
                    Also, there's a facsimile of Alfonso X el Sabio's "Book of Stones".  This is Spanish, 13th Century, though since Alfonso was so prolific there's the belief that he just copied a bunch of Arabic texts and signed his own name to the translation....anyways, I have a translated copy, and it's thoroughly whacked in a delightful way - he attributes all the gemstones of the zodiac to astrological signs, along with how to collect said stones, and when they are at their most powerful.  Some of the book sounds like the demented ramblings of a poppy addict, and some sounds almost like a modern geological text, with everything in between.....wonderful stuff!
                     
                    So, there are two points on the huge timeline we study - herb charms in 11th century Anglo-Saxon England, and astrological correspondences in 13th century Spain.  Whee, the search continues!
                     
                    -Carowyn
                  • Alyson
                    Yes. They were used during the mediaeval period, though Christian prayers replaced pagan chants and iconography replaced the charms. The astrological
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 14, 2007
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                      Yes. They were used during the mediaeval period, though Christian prayers replaced pagan chants and iconography replaced the charms. The astrological importance re: gathering, harvesting, use, etc... remained.
                      Kemper 
                       
                       


                       

                          "We all straddle the abyss. If we never look down, we will never know who we are"-Oscar Wilde


                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: "MUSICA88@..." <MUSICA88@...>
                      To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 2:50:32 PM
                      Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

                      Aren't charms and astrological correspondences period, though?



                      See what's free at AOL.com.

                    • jack hollandbeck
                      See, this is why this site is fun. I get to learn. I envy your linguistic skills to be able to do translations. What fun! Thanks for your expertise. Now I have
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 14, 2007
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                        See, this is why this site is fun. I get to learn. I envy your linguistic skills to be able to do translations. What fun! Thanks for your expertise. Now I have another work to find. lol

                        Jack


                        Stephen Pollington's boook is a good one (I own it); however, the manscripts from which it is based upon, Bald's Leeceboc, the Laguna mss, and a few others have both archic not modern knowledge although some of qualities of the herbs are the same. While it will give you a great understanding of the history behind many of the herbs, their remedies need to be crossed reference before use. Not to mention that we do not usually use any of the charms, iconography, and astrologcal methods anymore. Stephen Pollington's books are usually translated and edited by himself. I've done some translattions myself and some of the coincide and others do not. He is not a historical herbologist, Pollington is an expert of the Anglo-Saxon language. Take his information and cross-reference-I have found discrepancies between his book and the Agnus Castus (another OE manuscript) and other recent books.
                         
                        Kemper
                         
                        Sorry about the spelling the keyboad I am using sticks.
                         
                         


                         

                            "We all straddle the abyss. If we never look down, we will never know who we are"-Oscar Wilde


                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: jack hollandbeck <original_xman@...>
                        To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, June 11, 2007 12:55:03 PM
                        Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

                        Howdy. I have found a couple of books to be quite helpful, one of which I learned about from this site: "History of Food" by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, and Stephen Pollington's "Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healing."

                        You might also check out these websites for historical sources/interpretat ions.

                        LacusCurtius: Into the Roman World (http://penelope. uchicago. edu/Thayer/ E/Roman/home. html)

                        Miercinga Theod (http://www.ealdriht .org/)

                        Internet Ancient History Sourcebook (http://www.fordham. edu/halsall/ ancient/asbook. html)


                        These should keep you busy for about 6 months. lol Good luck and have fun.
                        Jack



                        To: SCA-Herbalist@ yahoogroups. com
                        From: gordonse@one. net
                        Date: Mon, 11 Jun 2007 08:52:27 -0400
                        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Favorite Herb Books

                        I've been reading a great herb book which has some detailed info on the particular herbs.  I'd like to learn about more different herbs though and more specifics on using them.  Does anyone have recommendations?  I am interested in cooking uses, medical uses, and other useful functions such as making dyes.
                         
                        Modern and period items are both of interest as I like to cross check the older info.  Often the newer books help me understand how the older recipe or remedy works.
                         
                        Sharon

                        Change is good. See what's different about Windows Live Hotmail. Check it out!




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