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Re: New to the list

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  • Linda Krecker-Schkred
    Ulbrecht, Two years ago I moved from living in Arizona for thirty years to New Jersey. Although I was just starting out, I had a good sized herb garden there.
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 11, 2000
      Ulbrecht,

      Two years ago I moved from living in Arizona for thirty years to New
      Jersey. Although I was just starting out, I had a good sized herb
      garden there. I learned to keep most of the herbs in shade. Not
      partial shade but complete shade.

      In the Phoenix house I was lucky enough to have two mature trees
      (they looked like the ones in the park) about 4' apart. I placed my
      garden under these. I then built the garden upwards using 4x4's and
      store bought top soil. I didn't even try to use the native dirt, it's
      to acidic and sandy. I planted common kitchen herbs that I bought at
      a local garden store. I was not successful at all at starting from
      seed. I don't use the little pots (for inside starting) well and the
      earth dries out way to fast for outside seeding. Then I watered every
      day in the summer and almost every day during the rest of the year.
      Most plants did very well. A few were too delicate for the area.
      Basil, chives, thyme, oregano, all did well under the shade. Sage and
      rosemary did great but only in the corners of the garden that got a
      little bit of sun. Both would do fine under no or little shade.
      Rosemary is used as an evergreen shrub in commercial landscaping (try
      going near the American West buildings off Mill Avenue in Tempe).

      The first house house I owned in the Phoenix valley was brand new
      and had no trees. It was in Chandler and was a former cotton farm.
      Cotton leaches the ground more than any other plant so I was not
      willing to work with that dirt. That's where I started the raised
      garden concept. But because there was no shade, I bought shade fabric
      from the garden store and rigged up a canopy (kinda like a dining
      canopy). The garden did surprising well under that. I planted some
      flowers as well as herbs and everything grew and bloomed.

      However, here in New Jersey, I can throw seeds in the ground, ignore
      them (mostly) and things grow! It's quite amazing. My mother-in-law
      has loads of plants here that bloom from before the first frost to
      after the last frost. She can grow things!

      Rhianwen

      >From: "Albert Boyle" <ALBOYLE@...>
      >
      >I take it that I m the only one on the list who lives in the desert
      >south-west. I am looking for herbs (especially the edible type) that can
      >handle summer highs of 118 degrees F. Also, direct sun can destroy even
      >plants that require it in other climates. <sigh>
      >
      >There are several plants available to me. But most of them require special
      >care that I don't have the time to give them. I'll keep trying, though.
      >
      >Ulbrecht
      >
      >
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    • Aelfwyn@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/11/00 10:04:45 AM Pacific Standard Time, rhianwen@pop.mindspring.com writes:
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 11, 2000
        In a message dated 2/11/00 10:04:45 AM Pacific Standard Time,
        rhianwen@... writes:

        << However, here in New Jersey, I can throw seeds in the ground, ignore
        them (mostly) and things grow! It's quite amazing. My mother-in-law
        has loads of plants here that bloom from before the first frost to
        after the last frost. She can grow things!

        Rhianwen >>
        I spent 17 years in New Jersey, and yes, there is good reason it is called
        the "Garden State". So many herbs will winter over in NJ. Up here in Maine,
        I've had to learn lots of new tricks to get things to mature in a much
        shorter growing season. Like always planting on the southfacing walls and
        even building a low rock wall to help make an "enclosed garden" of sorts.
        Gotta love all our various regional challenges!
        Aelfwyn
      • Albert Boyle
        Thanks. I live in an apartment that has a small plot associated with it, and I am trying something similar to what you have described with you raised garden
        Message 3 of 25 , Feb 11, 2000
          Thanks.

          I live in an apartment that has a small plot associated with it, and I am
          trying something similar to what you have described with you raised garden
          along the patio wall. I will try the shade-screen idea.

          I'd use a bubbler system or a soaker hose, but my hose connects directly to
          the kitchen sink and I need to have access.

          Ulbrecht
        • Newbrg@aol.com
          In a message dated 00-02-11 08:55:37 EST, you write:
          Message 4 of 25 , Feb 11, 2000
            In a message dated 00-02-11 08:55:37 EST, you write:

            <<
            You know, I was looking at this message from last week and thinking:
            booklist?
            What do you all think, would you like us to maintain a list on the website
            of books that have been recommended?
            >>

            Actually, a list that included NOT recommended books would be a good idea,
            too. Maybe I should go make a list of mine . . .

            Johanna le M
          • Linda Krecker-Schkred
            Also be mindful of the color of your walls. The typical desert white or off white wall can reflect to a great degree and dry out your plants. Cover the walls
            Message 5 of 25 , Feb 12, 2000
              Also be mindful of the color of your walls. The typical desert white
              or off white wall can reflect to a great degree and dry out your
              plants. Cover the walls with the shade fabric or a viney type thing
              as well.

              Rhianwen

              >From: "Albert Boyle" <ALBOYLE@...>
              >
              >Thanks.
              >
              >I live in an apartment that has a small plot associated with it, and I am
              >trying something similar to what you have described with you raised garden
              >along the patio wall. I will try the shade-screen idea.
              >
              >I'd use a bubbler system or a soaker hose, but my hose connects directly to
              >the kitchen sink and I need to have access.
              >
              >Ulbrecht
              >
              >
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              >[SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@... to leave this list]
            • Lori/ Eriana
              I, too, would like to have a small herb garden, but live in a small apt. in a downtown area with no grass anywhere. I ve tried to grow inside, but either the
              Message 6 of 25 , Feb 13, 2000
                I, too, would like to have a small herb garden, but live in a small apt. in
                a downtown area with no grass anywhere. I've tried to grow inside, but
                either the cats get to it or it dies from too much or too little light,
                maybe? Any suggestions? I live in south central PA.

                Also, there are a few people in my shire who would be interested in this but
                do not have internet access. Any ideas of a newsletter or something for
                those types interested?

                Eriana


                My advice? Start small. My first herb garden (way too many years ago to
                admit) was three parsley plants, 5 marigolds, one clump of chives, a thyme
                and a sage plant. How I fussed over those plants! Nothing was ever better
                watered, weeded, carefully clipped, etc.

                My beginner's herb garden would include: chives, thyme (English; if you
                want you can be extravagant and go in for golden lemon thyme too), sage,
                basil, parsley, mint (in a pot if you don't want it to spread), lemon
                balm (in a pot if you don't want it to spread), and marjoram or oregano.
                If you have space to keep things inside over the winter, a rosemary plant
                would be nice too: the ARP hybrid is supposed to be winter-hardy but I
                have never tried it. If you have the space and patience, some lavender is
                nice but most varieties won't bloom the first year.

                Whatever you plant, you'll have too much of SOMETHING next year-- one year
                it was orange bergamot mint, another year it was anise-- we had anise
                everywhere for two years-- then it was catnip; now it's lemon balm,
                according to my mom.

                Hey, everyone: want to set up a plant swap somewhere/sometime? Or maybe
                just arrange plant swaps over the list?

                Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
                disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me...

                "You do not lead by hitting people over the head -- that's assault,
                not leadership." Dwight D. Eisenhower


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              • Jenne Heise
                ... Hm. I ve found that for indoor plants, you want annuals or tender perennials. This means you have to replace the annuals regularly, but it does work.
                Message 7 of 25 , Feb 13, 2000
                  > I, too, would like to have a small herb garden, but live in a small apt. in
                  > a downtown area with no grass anywhere. I've tried to grow inside, but
                  > either the cats get to it or it dies from too much or too little light,
                  > maybe? Any suggestions? I live in south central PA.

                  Hm. I've found that for indoor plants, you want annuals or tender
                  perennials. This means you have to replace the annuals regularly, but it
                  does work. Chives, bush leaf basil, marjoram and parsley, as well as
                  rosemary and myrtle have done well for me but you have to monitor the
                  water situation closely. They like to be heavily watered but allowed to
                  dry out between waterings; too wet or too long dry and they die.

                  I've had absolutely no luck with growing Sage indoors over the winter-- it
                  needs that downtime-- but as an annual that dies in winter I've had luck
                  with it in an east-facing window. The best luck I had was in an unheated
                  but insulated back porch room with large windows facing west; all my herbs
                  thrived there. (I'm in East-central PA-- Allentown-- but that year I lived
                  in Emmaus, near the Rodale headquarters, and found that EVERYTHING
                  thrived... *grin*)

                  A non-period class of herbs that I've found do very well indoors are the
                  scented geraniums. Beware, however: scented geraniums are addictive. You
                  buy one: lemon or rose, for instance. Then you go into the garden store
                  and see nutmeg scented, or apple... or see citronella geraniums marked
                  down and slowly perishing in the grocery's plant section... or pick up a
                  catalog, and suddenly you have eight or nine geraniums all growing bushy
                  and leggy all over the house.

                  > Also, there are a few people in my shire who would be interested in this but
                  > do not have internet access. Any ideas of a newsletter or something for
                  > those types interested?

                  Yes. We have a volunteer newsletter editor, and now all we have to do is
                  starting thinking about content and how often and getting contributions
                  and all...

                  Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
                  disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me...

                  "You do not lead by hitting people over the head -- that's assault,
                  not leadership." Dwight D. Eisenhower
                • Argente@aol.com
                  re: I, too, would like to have a small herb garden, but live in a small apt. in a downtown area with no grass anywhere. I ve tried to grow inside, but either
                  Message 8 of 25 , Feb 14, 2000
                    re: I, too, would like to have a small herb garden, but live in a small apt.
                    in
                    a downtown area with no grass anywhere. I've tried to grow inside, but
                    either the cats get to it or it dies from too much or too little light,
                    maybe? Any suggestions? I live in south central PA.

                    Live in southeastern PA. I use leaky fish tanks with lights. If the leak is
                    above the bottom few inches, they work. I have saved some of my tanks and
                    used them. Clear plastic over top if near/in a window. Fish tank lights and
                    tanks may be cheaper than fancy nursery supplies, and possibly easier to find.

                    I trained my dogs and cats not to eat plants by putting spiny cactus where
                    they were previously eating plants. The long spines do not come off easily
                    and stick in the animal, but just prick their noses or mouths.

                    We winter our hot peppers in the house and no animal eats them. Hot peppers
                    are perennials and some of mine are 2 or 3 years old. argente
                  • Mara Jensen
                    Lords and Ladies; Good day. I have recently subscribed to the list. I have been trying to gather information about Herbology for about a year now. I am
                    Message 9 of 25 , Jan 24, 2001
                      Lords and Ladies;
                      Good day. I have recently subscribed to the list. I have been
                      trying to gather information about Herbology for about a year now. I
                      am trying to get some information about making medicinal items that a
                      person in Italy around 1400-1500 might have used. Any help would be
                      much appreciated. Also what are some good books to get the
                      information about the plant life in and around Tuscany would be great.
                      Thank you so much,

                      Maura da Vicopisano
                    • Jenne Heise
                      ... Dear Maura, Did you get some answers to your questions? -- Jadwiga -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@mail.browser.net disclaimer: i
                      Message 10 of 25 , Mar 14, 2001
                        > Lords and Ladies;
                        > Good day. I have recently subscribed to the list. I have been
                        > trying to gather information about Herbology for about a year now. I
                        > am trying to get some information about making medicinal items that a
                        > person in Italy around 1400-1500 might have used. Any help would be
                        > much appreciated. Also what are some good books to get the
                        > information about the plant life in and around Tuscany would be great.
                        > Thank you so much,
                        > Maura da Vicopisano

                        Dear Maura,
                        Did you get some answers to your questions?
                        -- Jadwiga

                        --
                        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
                        disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
                        "Are you finished? If you're finished, you have to put down the spoon."
                      • Maura da Vicopisano
                        Dear Jadwiga, I did get a couple of book titles too look at. Although if you have further imput it would be very appreciated. Thanks, Maura ...
                        Message 11 of 25 , Mar 14, 2001
                          Dear Jadwiga,
                          I did get a couple of book titles too look at. Although if you have further
                          imput it would be very appreciated.
                          Thanks,
                          Maura


                          >From: Jenne Heise <jenne@...>
                          >Reply-To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          >To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                          >Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] New to the list
                          >Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2001 16:17:19 -0500 (EST)
                          >
                          > > Lords and Ladies;
                          > > Good day. I have recently subscribed to the list. I have been
                          > > trying to gather information about Herbology for about a year now. I
                          > > am trying to get some information about making medicinal items that a
                          > > person in Italy around 1400-1500 might have used. Any help would be
                          > > much appreciated. Also what are some good books to get the
                          > > information about the plant life in and around Tuscany would be great.
                          > > Thank you so much,
                          > > Maura da Vicopisano
                          >
                          >Dear Maura,
                          >Did you get some answers to your questions?
                          >-- Jadwiga
                          >
                          >--
                          >Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
                          >disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
                          >"Are you finished? If you're finished, you have to put down the spoon."

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