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Re: Fwd: Help Honey bees May 2, 2007

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  • SKA: Greet
    ... in a ... Please report back what you find, Ysabeau - I m very interested in bees. ~Greet
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 30 9:44 AM
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      --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Ysabeau <lady.ysabeau@...> wrote:
      >
      > Is there like a bee coop somewhere where you can help someone who is
      in a
      > location and has the know-how willing to do it but needs some financial
      > backing? ...
      >
      > I think I'll search the net to see.

      Please report back what you find, Ysabeau - I'm very interested in bees.

      ~Greet
    • Tom Vincent
      “Praying is like a rocking chair - it ll give you something to do, but it won t get you anywhere” -Gypsy Rose Better to look at reasons why so many species
      Message 2 of 19 , Apr 30 11:00 AM
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        “Praying is like a rocking chair - it'll give you something to do, but it won't get you anywhere” -Gypsy Rose


        Better to look at reasons why so many species are disappearing:  Human population, hunting/poaching, encroachment, pollution and habitat destruction.

        Work for sustainability of communities.  Reduce, reuse, recycle.  Walk or bike instead of driving whenever possible.  Adopt instead of breed.  Have a fuel-efficient car.

        Bees are in some ways another 'canary in the coal mine', like whales and frogs.  Like so many other species, they're being decimated by human activity/interference.

        -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
        Tom Vincent
        -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

        Due to deliberate damage by Yahoo, my new e-mail address is TomVincent@...
        Boycott Yahoo!



        ----- Original Message -----
        snip
         
        send out prayers or energy or magick to help the bees on Wednesday. Speaking as a sometimes bee keeper, honey may either soon be a thing of the past or beyond most of our ability to afford; and when the pollination suffers, crops suffer as well. Catastrophic Colony Collapse Disorder has followed on the heels of the Varoa mite infestations. "beekeepers in 24 states have reported losses as high as 80 and even 90 percent" as it says in this article.
        snip
        Tchipakkan

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      • Emily Groner
        Your local County Extension office should be able to put anyone in touch with local bee keepers. Another source for bee keepers is your local farmers market,
        Message 3 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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          Your local County Extension office should be able to put anyone in
          touch with local bee keepers. Another source for bee keepers is your
          local farmers market, as there is always someone who sells honey or
          know of someone who does.
          Emily

          --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Ysabeau <lady.ysabeau@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Is there like a bee coop somewhere where you can help someone who
          is in a
          > location and has the know-how willing to do it but needs some
          financial
          > backing? I'm not a big honey person in general but I know that it
          finds its
          > way into many of the things I do like without being the primary
          ingredient.
          >
          > I think I'll search the net to see. I only use about one jar of
          honey a
          > year, maybe! so I don't know if I'm a good person for this but
          maybe....
          >
          > Ysabeau
          >
          >
          > On 4/30/07, Shield of Peace <randgrithr@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Greetings to all,
          > >
          > > I understand that this is a list comprised of people of various
          > > spiritual beliefs, and this is a good-hearted effort that I agree
          > > with. That said, I think it's time we stopped talking to spirit
          and
          > > instead started listening. The answer has already been with us for
          > > some time. In this particular case, spirit is not the entity that
          > > needs to be communicated with.
          > >
          > > Whether the crisis with the bees is based on technology, disease
          or a
          > > diminishing of the natural environment, it would be difficult to
          argue
          > > against the thought that mankind is very likely ultimately
          responsible
          > > for the systemic inbalance that has caused this crisis.
          > >
          > > When I attended Angus Kerr's beekeeping classes several Pennsics
          ago,
          > > he was encouraging people to begin keeping their own bees in
          response
          > > to the varroa mite crisis. At the time, the only response the
          industry
          > > had was to encourage more beekeeping in an effort to stay one step
          > > ahead of the disease. It was a good idea then and it's a good idea
          > > now.
          > >
          > > Asking everyone to consider keeping bees is a bit much, but I
          would
          > > say that no harm would be done by people who made an effort to
          raise
          > > awareness of the crisis in their local communities, and to
          address it
          > > with local government. Despite the general good behavior of the
          > > domestic honeybee, most people are afraid of bees and as a result
          many
          > > suburbs do not allow beekeeping within their jurisdictions.
          > >
          > > Many people here may have good contacts with gardens and nurseries
          > > where bees could potentially be kept without the local (generally
          > > ignorant) populace getting all weirded out about hives near their
          > > backyards and their children.
          > >
          > > Successful beekeeping can produce hundreds of pounds of honey a
          year -
          > > a good secondary source of income for people in rural and suburban
          > > districts where it is allowed.
          > >
          > > The general public awareness, along with the laws of local, state
          and
          > > federal level concerning beekeeping need to be looked at and
          changed
          > > in order to deal with this crisis.
          > >
          > > We don't need to talk to spirit. However we perceive spirit and
          deity,
          > > all of us are here because we have respect for the gifts of
          nature.
          > > Spirit, in whatever way we see it, is already on our side. We
          need to
          > > return the favor and bring the message about the problem home to
          the
          > > ones who have truly caused it and the ones whose responsibility
          is to
          > > solve it - our people, our communities and our governments.
          > >
          > > YIS,
          > >
          > > Aquilina of the Sea Cliffs
          > >
          > >
          >
        • hillwizard2@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/1/2007 8:24:35 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, TomVincent@Inbox.com writes: Bees are in some ways another canary in the coal mine , like
          Message 4 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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            In a message dated 5/1/2007 8:24:35 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, TomVincent@... writes:
            Bees are in some ways another 'canary in the coal mine', like whales and frogs.  Like so many other species, they're being decimated by human activity/interferen ce.
            Hi Tom
             
            I read the story,  Did you notice that it was not about wild bees?   It was about domestic bees that are being shopped up and down the coast
             
            the story talks about a guy having problems with the bees that will be pollinating the 2005 crops.  those crops and the ones in 2006 all made it to market so though it may have been a big problem for some it was not the end of the world thing some people are talking about.  I am in a fruit growing area, central Washington,  and have asked several people if they are having problems getting bees this year and no one I have talked to is.
             
            Maybe this story is a lot of smoke and mirrors

            I am lost in the Kingdom of An Tir - Somewhere south of the College of Cranehaven, north of the Barony of Vulkanfeldt, to the west of the Shire of Ambergard and east of the Barony of Madrone.  I am also without a name so will call myself
            Mike the Hillwizard




            See what's free at AOL.com.
          • Tom Vincent
            This is by no means limited to domestic bees, but to European honeybees. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070223-bees.html
            Message 5 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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              This is by no means limited to domestic bees, but to European honeybees.

              http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070223-bees.html
              http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20070329/bees_ccd_070329?s_name=&no_ads
              http://www.startribune.com/535/story/1142266.html

              I doubt it's smoke and mirrors.  Why on earth would you suggest that?  Who would gain?  Always follow the money.

              -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
              Tom Vincent
              -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

              Due to deliberate damage by Yahoo, my new e-mail address is TomVincent@...
              Boycott Yahoo!


              -----Original Message-----
              From: hillwizard2@...
              Sent: Tue, 1 May 2007 11:55:52 EDT
              To: sca-herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Fwd: Help Honey bees May 2, 2007

              In a message dated 5/1/2007 8:24:35 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, TomVincent@Inbox. com writes:
              Bees are in some ways another 'canary in the coal mine', like whales and frogs.  Like so many other species, they're being decimated by human activity/interferen ce.
              Hi Tom
               
              I read the story,  Did you notice that it was not about wild bees?   It was about domestic bees that are being shopped up and down the coast
               
              the story talks about a guy having problems with the bees that will be pollinating the 2005 crops.  those crops and the ones in 2006 all made it to market so though it may have been a big problem for some it was not the end of the world thing some people are talking about.  I am in a fruit growing area, central Washington,  and have asked several people if they are having problems getting bees this year and no one I have talked to is.
               
              Maybe this story is a lot of smoke and mirrors

              I am lost in the Kingdom of An Tir - Somewhere south of the College of Cranehaven, north of the Barony of Vulkanfeldt, to the west of the Shire of Ambergard and east of the Barony of Madrone.  I am also without a name so will call myself
              Mike the Hillwizard




              See what's free at AOL.com.

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            • Virginia Taylor
              I have to agree with you- prayer is not enough, although I figure it can t hurt and if it raises awareness that alone is a good step. I don t think it s any
              Message 6 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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                I have to agree with you- prayer is not enough, although I figure it
                can't hurt and if it raises awareness that alone is a good step.
                I don't think it's any one thing. I figure that like much of modern
                human disease it's cumulative stresses. Could be cell phones
                contribute, could be bees don't like being driven around, could be
                bioengeneered plants, or pesticides, or fungicides, or cleared
                wetlands or monoculture or most probably all these things together.
                And reducing each of these things as much as we can will probably help.
                Tchipakkan
              • hillwizard2@aol.com
                Hi Tom Your National Geographic News story is about a Pennsylvania beekeeper losing his bees in Florida sounds to me like he is shapping his bees up and
                Message 7 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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                  Hi Tom
                   
                  Your National Geographic News story is about a Pennsylvania beekeeper losing his bees in Florida  sounds to me like he is shapping his bees up and down the coast too.
                   
                  In oct 5, 2004,  [PLEASE NOTE 2004]  National Geographic News wrote  "Bee Decline May Spell End of Some Fruits, Vegetables"  and "in the last 50 years the domesticated honeybee population—which most farmers depend on for pollination—has declined by about 50 percent, scientists say. "
                   
                  All the stories are sugesting this will cause a shortage of crops  
                   
                  DID you notice a shortage of crops in 2004?   2005? or 2006?   Do you think there will be one this year?
                   
                  There were no shortages of crops like they said then what would you call it?
                   
                  If this came from the White house you and I would question it - when it is coming from a different power broker I still question it - why don't you?
                   
                  so take your advice - no past shortage of fruit because of no bees so follow the money who is making it or getting power from the story
                   

                  I am lost in the Kingdom of An Tir - Somewhere south of the College of Cranehaven, north of the Barony of Vulkanfeldt, to the west of the Shire of Ambergard and east of the Barony of Madrone.  I am also without a name so will call myself
                  Mike the Hillwizard
                   
                  In a message dated 5/1/2007 1:16:58 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, TomVincent@... writes:
                  This is by no means limited to domestic bees, but to European honeybees.

                  http://news. nationalgeograph ic.com/news/ 2007/02/070223- bees.html
                  http://www.ctv. ca/servlet/ ArticleNews/ story/CTVNews/ 20070329/ bees_ccd_ 070329?s_ name=&no_ads
                  http://www.startrib une.com/535/ story/1142266. html

                  I doubt it's smoke and mirrors.  Why on earth would you suggest that?  Who would gain?  Always follow the money.




                  See what's free at AOL.com.
                • hillwizard2@aol.com
                  In a message dated 5/1/2007 7:14:33 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, tchipakkan@tds.net writes: human disease it s cumulative stresses. Could be cell phones
                  Message 8 of 19 , May 1, 2007
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                    In a message dated 5/1/2007 7:14:33 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, tchipakkan@... writes:
                    human disease it's cumulative stresses. Could be cell phones
                    contribute, could be bees don't like being driven around, could be
                    bioengeneered plants, or pesticides, or fungicides, or cleared
                    wetlands or monoculture or most probably all these things together.
                    And reducing each of these things as much as we can will probably help.
                    Tchipakkan
                    Hi Tchipakkan
                     
                    If you park 6 hives around your farm, over time, you will probably have some problems.  Beekeepers have been having problems for as long as there have been bee keepers.  Poisons are a problems too.   Bioengeneered plants, cleared
                    wetlands and monocultures don't help any.  But this is happening to people who but 3,000 hives on a train car and ship them up and down the coast.  The owner in a deal like this is not what I think of when I hear "Beekeeper"  these guys are just like Tyson Foods.  I told Tom to
                    follow the money -  wait and see these "Beekeepers" will be asking congress to send them money
                     
                    We need to take care of the planit we live on,  but lets not get sucked in to this rip job

                    I am lost in the Kingdom of An Tir - Somewhere south of the College of Cranehaven, north of the Barony of Vulkanfeldt, to the west of the Shire of Ambergard and east of the Barony of Madrone.  I am also without a name so will call myself
                    Mike the Hillwizard




                    See what's free at AOL.com.
                  • Amy Bernard
                    But this is happening to people who put 3,000 hives on a train car and ship them up and down the coast. The owner in a deal like this is not what I think of
                    Message 9 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                      But this is happening to people who put 3,000 hives on a train car and ship them up and down the coast.  The owner in a deal like this is not what I think of when I hear "Beekeeper"  these guys are just like Tyson Foods.  I told Tom to follow the money -  wait and see these "Beekeepers" will be asking congress to send them money

                      Good point - the conspirist in me can appreciate that :)

                      Myself, I do not keep bees (yet).  I have not noticed a drop in local population here, although I'm sure we lost many when we had 70 degree temperatures last month followed by 14" of snow the following week!  Remember though, that there are many other pollinators out there as well - like moths, butterflies, as well as many other varieties of bees and wasps.

                      I do not want to make light of this issue, but the previous poster brings up a good point.  The reports out lately only deal with the pollinators that render profits for someone.

                      I will still do a healing reiki meditation today though....

                      Ameline




                    • Shield of Peace
                      Frame hives are actually better for the bees. They have been in use since the 1850 s or so. The problem with destroying skeps is that it also destroys the bee
                      Message 10 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                        Frame hives are actually better for the bees. They have been in use
                        since the 1850's or so. The problem with destroying skeps is that it
                        also destroys the bee larvae in the combs. Since bees naturally store
                        honey in different places in the hive, you can leave the larval frames
                        alone and just harvest the ones that have honey storage. You also get
                        a lot more honey by volume for the area taken up by the hive.

                        You can learn a lot more if you are really interested by joining the
                        Skepsofold list. It is moderated by Angus Kerr, the same person who
                        runs the SCA beekeeping classes at Pennsic and is a New York State
                        beekeeping inspector mundanely.

                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/skepsofold/

                        Hope this helps,

                        Aquilina
                      • Amy Bernard
                        Actually, the reason those wicker baskets are now illegal is because they cannot be properly inspected for mites. Each state has their own inspectors, and
                        Message 11 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                          Actually, the reason those wicker baskets are now illegal is because they cannot be properly inspected for mites.  Each state has their own inspectors, and they must be able to access all parts of the hive.
                          Sorry, don't have period references off the top of my head....

                          Ameline

                          On 5/2/07, Marian Walke <marian@...> wrote:

                          Regarding honey bees...

                          I am interested in the report that there have been mentions of bee
                          population problems since the late 1800's. How about in period? I am
                          not a beekeeper, but I know there were books such as The Female Monarchy
                          about the subject pre-1650. Do any of these works mention sudden
                          population failures?

                          Actually, my interest is that of a basket maker. Period bee skeps were
                          basically upside-down baskets, made of straw or wicker. I have been
                          told that these are now illegal because they are destroyed in the
                          process of collecting honey from them. Now (so I am told) all
                          beekeepers must use manufactured boxes with removable sides. I am
                          wondering if those boxes are TOO good in some way that is bad for the
                          bees, just as perfectly sealed houses turn out to be bad for people.
                          One way to test this idea is to find out if wild bee populations that
                          build their own hives are having the same health problems as the ones in
                          modern hives. Can anyone on this list give me information on that aspect?

                          Thank you,
                          --Old Marian




                          --
                          www.crookedwall.org
                          www.bthumbstudios.com
                        • Marian Walke
                          Regarding honey bees... I am interested in the report that there have been mentions of bee population problems since the late 1800 s. How about in period? I
                          Message 12 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                            Regarding honey bees...

                            I am interested in the report that there have been mentions of bee
                            population problems since the late 1800's. How about in period? I am
                            not a beekeeper, but I know there were books such as The Female Monarchy
                            about the subject pre-1650. Do any of these works mention sudden
                            population failures?


                            Actually, my interest is that of a basket maker. Period bee skeps were
                            basically upside-down baskets, made of straw or wicker. I have been
                            told that these are now illegal because they are destroyed in the
                            process of collecting honey from them. Now (so I am told) all
                            beekeepers must use manufactured boxes with removable sides. I am
                            wondering if those boxes are TOO good in some way that is bad for the
                            bees, just as perfectly sealed houses turn out to be bad for people.
                            One way to test this idea is to find out if wild bee populations that
                            build their own hives are having the same health problems as the ones in
                            modern hives. Can anyone on this list give me information on that aspect?

                            Thank you,
                            --Old Marian
                          • Robin Hackett
                            Our girls are doing just fine, even through the heat wave and subsequent blizzard. :) I live in an urban area, but with a back yard, so we have one hive. Angus
                            Message 13 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                              Our girls are doing just fine, even through the heat wave and
                              subsequent blizzard. :)

                              I live in an urban area, but with a back yard, so we have one hive.
                              Angus Kerr (Baron bee-pusher) helped to get it started, now we are
                              returning the favor after a bear got his hives.

                              Small stationary bee keepers do help to maintain healthy populations,
                              but we still get our share of mites and invaders.

                              Don't bust too hard on John Miller's 10,000 hive operation. From the
                              article, it states that his ancestor helped to design the modern
                              hive, where bees can be moved instead of killed, when you want to
                              harvest honey and wax.

                              With the good comes bad, and vice versa.

                              eLeri Nefyn
                              Barony of Concordia of the Snows
                              East Kingdom
                              Upstate NY

                              --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Amy Bernard"
                              <sparrowhawk9@...> wrote:
                              >
                              I have not noticed a drop in local population here, although I'm sure
                              we lost many when we had 70 degree temperatures last month followed
                              by 14" of snow the following week!
                              >
                              > I will still do a healing reiki meditation today though....
                              >
                              > Ameline
                              >
                            • Robin Hackett
                              Marian, Try looking at the NY Dept of Conservation website, under the Pesticide program. Some registrations are called Emergency Exemptions and have a pretty
                              Message 14 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                                Marian,

                                Try looking at the NY Dept of Conservation website, under the
                                Pesticide program. Some registrations are called Emergency
                                Exemptions and have a pretty detailed explanation of the problem and
                                the potential solution. I remember in the coumaphos registration
                                discussion of mite infestations of wild as well as domesticated bees.

                                eLeri

                                --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Marian Walke <marian@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Regarding honey bees...
                                >
                                > I am interested in the report that there have been mentions of bee
                                > population problems since the late 1800's. How about in period? I
                                am
                                > not a beekeeper, but I know there were books such as The Female
                                Monarchy
                                > about the subject pre-1650. Do any of these works mention sudden
                                > population failures?
                                >
                                >
                                > Actually, my interest is that of a basket maker. Period bee skeps
                                were
                                > basically upside-down baskets, made of straw or wicker. I have
                                been
                                > told that these are now illegal because they are destroyed in the
                                > process of collecting honey from them. Now (so I am told) all
                                > beekeepers must use manufactured boxes with removable sides. I am
                                > wondering if those boxes are TOO good in some way that is bad for
                                the
                                > bees, just as perfectly sealed houses turn out to be bad for
                                people.
                                > One way to test this idea is to find out if wild bee populations
                                that
                                > build their own hives are having the same health problems as the
                                ones in
                                > modern hives. Can anyone on this list give me information on that
                                aspect?
                                >
                                > Thank you,
                                > --Old Marian
                                >
                              • Marian Walke
                                ... Thank you! I have looked up that group. Once again I am blown away by the breadth of knowledge our Society can provide. --Old Marian
                                Message 15 of 19 , May 2, 2007
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                                  Shield of Peace wrote:
                                  > You can learn a lot more if you are really interested by joining the
                                  > Skepsofold list. It is moderated by Angus Kerr, the same person who
                                  > runs the SCA beekeeping classes at Pennsic and is a New York State
                                  > beekeeping inspector mundanely.

                                  Thank you! I have looked up that group. Once again I am blown away by
                                  the breadth of knowledge our Society can provide.

                                  --Old Marian
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