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Re: Looking for books on subject

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  • Kim
    Thanks for the infor. I can t wait to get started. ... library, ... Bingen, ... Medieval ... won t ... same ... not
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 28, 2007
      Thanks for the infor. I can't wait to get started.

      --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Marian Walke <marian@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Go with the primary sources, available in translation at your
      library,
      > rather than secondary sources: Galen, Dioscorides, Hildegard von
      Bingen,
      > Albertus Magnus, William Turner, etc. These are the texts that
      Medieval
      > herbalists and apothecaries studied. Reading modern herb books
      won't
      > give you the same information and defininitely won't give you the
      same
      > flavor.
      >
      > John Gerard published his Herbal in 1593; Culpepper's Herbal did
      not
      > appear till 1660, so he's a bit late.
      >
      > Happy reading!
      > --Old Marian
      >
    • Terri Spencer
      I agree with using primary sources, and those are all good ones. Here s one I m playing with now, though it is slow going as it is in the original French: La
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 28, 2007
        I agree with using primary sources, and those are all good ones.
        Here's one I'm playing with now, though it is slow going as it is in
        the original French:

        La Pharmacopee, 1588, M. Laurent Joubert, Professor of Medicine, Royal
        Doctor and Chancellor of the University of Montpellier
        http://www.bama.ua.edu/~gderoche/joubert/001.htm

        However, I am also looking for info more directed to what apothecaries
        did than what they studied. I've found a few relevant tidbits online,
        inventory lists or tax records, but most are not in English. Can
        anyone recommend good primary or secondary sources, preferably in
        English, on pre-1600 apothecary practices?

        Receipts are good, but also things like containers used to store and/or
        display ingredients and products, how they were packaged after sale,
        classic vs. proprietary blends (like powder fort or theriac), what we
        think of today as non-medicinal preparations (like confections or
        distilled waters), community status, role vs. physicians and home
        caregivers, typical clients, training of apprentices, etc.

        My impressions of those things are based on bits from tertiary sources,
        discussions or speculation. I'd like a more solid understanding for
        persona development, A&S projects and eventually a research paper or
        article, so this is a long term project. Good tertiary overviews with
        bibliographies I can mine would be great too. I'm armed with ILL
        forms, ready to research, and would appreciate any and all
        recommendations.

        Many thanks,

        Tara


        marian responded:
        > Go with the primary sources, available in translation at your
        > library, rather than secondary sources: Galen, Dioscorides, Hildegard

        > von Bingen, Albertus Magnus, William Turner, etc. These are the texts

        > that Medieval herbalists and apothecaries studied. Reading modern
        > herb books won't give you the same information and defininitely won't

        > give you the same flavor. John Gerard published his Herbal in 1593;
        > Culpepper's Herbal did not appear till 1660, so he's a bit late.

        katraofdragonslair wrote:
        > I am from the Kingdom of Caid and I am looking for books on the
        > subject of herbalism and apothecaries of the middle ages. I am trying
        > to get a head start on Pentatholon 2009. Any help would be great.
        >
        > Thanks
        > Katra of Dragons Lair
        > Kingdom of Caid.




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      • Marian
        ... Terri, I have found a small example for you. This is from a book titled The Parlement of Pratlers , a book of dialogs written by John Eliot and published
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 9, 2007
          --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Terri Spencer <tarats@...> wrote:

          > . . . I am also looking for info more directed to what apothecaries
          > did than what they studied. I've found a few relevant tidbits online,
          > inventory lists or tax records, but most are not in English. Can
          > anyone recommend good primary or secondary sources, preferably in
          > English, on pre-1600 apothecary practices?

          Terri, I have found a small example for you. This is from a book
          titled "The Parlement of Pratlers", a book of dialogs written by John
          Eliot and published in 1591. These were examples in French and
          English of the sort of conversations a young man traveling in Europe
          might need to know. The book was reissued in 1928, with just the
          English wording (original inconsistent spelling preserved). Pages
          69-70 read:

          THE APOTHCARIE

          IOHN: Poticarie, haue you made my drinke?
          APOTICARIE: Who prescribed you this receipt?
          IOHN: Tis maister Doctor.
          APOTICARIE: What Doctor?
          IOHN: Will you know? Know you not the hand?
          APOTICARIE: No truly.
          IOHN: Albertus Magnus is the author. I haue translated it out of his
          vvorks of the secrets of damsels.
          APOTICARIE: Do you beleeue this monstrous lyar?
          IOHN: Is he so great a lyar?
          APOTICARIE: He sayth that there is vertue in stones, in hearbs, and in
          vvords,to make men in loue vvith vvomen, and vvomen with men.
          IOHN: No, no, tis another thing that I will do. I will coniure a
          spirit, and will go invisible.
          APOTICARIE: Let me see your Receit.
          IOHN: Read it.
          APOTICARIE: Take a Frogs tongue, and the blood of a bat. And how must
          I vse them?
          IOHN: Beat them vvell together in a morter.
          APOTICARIE: Doth it bind or loose?
          IOHN: Yea, yea, and make a man go to the &c. lustily. Take then a
          violl and stop it well. Whats that vvithin that box there?
          APOTICARIE: Tis pepper or Ginger.
          ION: VVhat haue you vvithin this great sacke?
          APOTICARIE: They are cloues, nutmegs, saffron, cynnimon and almonds.
          IOHN: What fine drogues are vvithin those boxes there bepainted with
          shapes of Harpies, of hares, of flying horses and flying harts?
          APOTICARIE: There is within them, balme, ambre, amomum, muske, ciuet,
          perles and other precious drugs.
          IOHN: Haue you no preseruatiue against the disease? you know vvhat I
          meane.
          APOTICARIE: Lay an emplaister to it.
          IOHN: You neede no other Treacle for that.
          APOTICARIE: I dare not purge, for the time is not good. Haue you a
          hard belly?
          IOHN: I am alwaies bound in my bellie almost, bring me a glister to
          morrow morning.
          APOTICARIE: I vnderstand you well now, let me alone.
          IOHN: Farewell till to morrow morning.

          So there is a picture of the shop with supplies in sacks and boxes
          (some painted with identifying pictures), vials to contain mixtures
          the apothecary makes up, and a list of some of the items available for
          his use. Also we see that a common complaint was constipation -- and
          considering how much of the diet was bread and porridge, how little of
          it (for the city dweller) was vegetables, is not surprising. I think I
          detect a reference to venereal disease as well.

          I find this sort of thing fascinating!

          --Old Marian
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