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Re: Kentucky (was questions...)

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  • Martin
    Ah...The persecution of the Old Wives . Those would be the Quacks that originated the usage of Black willow to ease the pain of headaches and loadstones to
    Message 1 of 41 , Nov 11, 2006
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      Ah...The persecution of the "Old Wives". Those would be the "Quacks"
      that originated the usage of Black willow to ease the pain of
      headaches and loadstones to help with blood flow and other
      such "nonsense", if I am correct.
      Modern medical practitioners know about medicines, but have no idea
      where the chemicals come from that make up those drugs. They do not
      realise that most drugs were obtained through the study of leaves,
      minerals and tinctures used by folk healers through the ages.
      The foxfire books are based on old mountain lore, but have excellent
      sections on herbs and healing practices along with information on
      how to grow and cultivate them. Also, they give the "old names" for
      many of the herbs, which have helped me immensly in translating old
      remedies and recipes.

      --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, Anwen Dutson
      <mountain_hedgewitch@...> wrote:
      >
      > The teacher who wrote the Foxfire books did a wonderful thing in
      doing so. A very dear friend of mine (my ex's first cousin and a
      resident of Neon, KY) begged me for natural remedies to help her
      overactive thyroid (she had been diagnosed and medicated for Graves
      disease a few years earlier). Even when I receive my diploma in
      herbal medicine, I still wouldn't be qualified to do so and told her
      that she needed to go to a naturopath. She told me that they didn't
      have any in her part of the country (nor any chiroprators or
      acupuncturists) - which I found to be close to the truth. The
      nearest was about 125 miles away in Lexington, and another all the
      way over in Virginia Beach, VA.
      >
      > These people desperately need healers like us as the people
      (mostly women) who did the healing eventually grew old and died with
      the younger people relying more on contemporary medical personnel
      who told them the old ones were quacks and old wives. Whether it is
      true or not, I was also told that the church (fundimentalists or
      whoever) discouraged their followers from using a healer as they
      were considered akin to witches and therefore in league with the
      devil.
      >
      > I would encourage anyone who is a schooled herbalist (college or
      apprenticeship) to consider that area of the country to practice in.
      I'd go just to be closer to my son and his family, but those folks
      have a bad attitude about my politics and my religion. <grin>
      >
      > Grannee Annie
      >
    • Anwen Dutson
      Does she know any Bentleys or Flemmings? That would be my son s family lines. Grannee Stephanie Ross wrote: How weird is that? My
      Message 41 of 41 , Nov 17, 2006
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        Does she know any Bentleys or Flemmings? That would be my son's family lines.
         
        Grannee


        Stephanie Ross <hlaislinn@...> wrote:
        How weird is that? My mom's family came from Letcher County too - Blackey,
        near Whitesburg. We were Dunn, Bach (Back), Ison, Stamper.... I have never
        been there but there is still a Dunn Cemetery in or near Blackey.

        ~Aislinn~




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