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acorns as food

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  • H MacAuley
    Dear Group, Greetings from Hedda the Bonesetter and herbal woman in the East. I have been researching wild edibles and have read of roasted acorns, tasting
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2006
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      Dear Group, 
       
      Greetings from Hedda the Bonesetter and herbal woman in the East.
       
      I have been researching wild edibles and have read of roasted acorns, tasting reasonable if roasted and quite awful it not.  But how would one roast these little guys?  Hull them first of not?  I see little worm holes under the cap and am discarding these ones (losing a lot that way!).  Some are lying on wet soil and have darkened and may or may not be mouldy inside.  It seems like I won't be getting a lot of useable nut meat.  Will it keep well without freezing once it is roasted?  What our ancestors went through!!
       
      Hedda


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    • Rickard, Patty
      Dear Hedda, If you are actually going to try to eat them, please make sure they are from white oaks (rounded lobes) rather than red oaks (pointed lobes). White
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 12, 2006
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        Dear Hedda,

        If you are actually going to try to eat them, please make sure they are from white oaks (rounded lobes) rather than red oaks (pointed lobes). White oak acorns develop in one year, so they don't accumulate as many tannins as the red oaks (take 2 years), so they're not quite as bitter. If I were going to fix them, I'd probably shell them, boil them (maybe 2x changing the water in between), then roast them. I'd probably freeze them afterward if I wasn't going to use them right away, so that the oils didn't go rancid.

        Good luck - let us know of your results!

        Ceit

        ________________________________

        From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com on behalf of H MacAuley
        Sent: Sat 11/11/2006 3:21 PM
        To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] acorns as food



        Dear Group,

        Greetings from Hedda the Bonesetter and herbal woman in the East.

        I have been researching wild edibles and have read of roasted acorns, tasting reasonable if roasted and quite awful it not. But how would one roast these little guys? Hull them first of not? I see little worm holes under the cap and am discarding these ones (losing a lot that way!). Some are lying on wet soil and have darkened and may or may not be mouldy inside. It seems like I won't be getting a lot of useable nut meat. Will it keep well without freezing once it is roasted? What our ancestors went through!!

        Hedda

        ________________________________

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      • Dianna Haught
        Gather the acorns and shell them. Our ancestors would put the acorns in a basket in a fast moving stream and leave them for a few days. This allowed the
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 12, 2006
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          Gather the acorns and shell them. Our ancestors would put the acorns in a
          basket in a fast moving stream and leave them for a few days. This allowed
          the tannins to leach out effortlessly. Most of us don't have a stream
          handy to use. Cover the acorns with water and boil. The water will turn
          dark from tannins. Throw out this water and repeat the process as many
          times as necessary to get out all the tannins. (This will vary by
          species.) They say that you'll usually need to boil the acorns 2-3 hours -
          changing the water several times in the process. The batch I tried took
          more like 4. The nutmeats are then allowed to dry for storage (can be
          accomplished by heating up the oven and then turning it off then putting in
          the nut spread out on a cookie sheet.) Or you can slow roast them. They
          don't have to be roasted unless you a) plan to make flour with them (I've
          never tried) or b) want to in order to compare flavors.

          It's a lot of work. But they are high in protein. Good luck,
          Avacyn

          >Dear Group,
          >
          >Greetings from Hedda the Bonesetter and herbal woman in the East.
          >
          >I have been researching wild edibles and have read of roasted acorns,
          >tasting reasonable if roasted and quite awful it not. But how would one
          >roast these little guys? Hull them first of not? I see little worm holes
          >under the cap and am discarding these ones (losing a lot that way!). Some
          >are lying on wet soil and have darkened and may or may not be mouldy
          >inside. It seems like I won't be getting a lot of useable nut meat. Will
          >it keep well without freezing once it is roasted? What our ancestors went
          >through!!
          >
          >Hedda



          "Every word has three meanings and three interpretations." Irish Proverb
        • Dianne & Greg Stucki
          ... I have two red oaks in my front yard, and an insane amount of acorns. Anything I can do with them, other than the amusement of watching the squirrels treat
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 17, 2006
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            At 09:48 PM 11/12/2006, you wrote:

            >Dear Hedda,
            >
            >If you are actually going to try to eat them, please make sure they
            >are from white oaks (rounded lobes) rather than red oaks (pointed
            >lobes). White oak acorns develop in one year, so they don't
            >accumulate as many tannins as the red oaks (take 2 years), so
            >they're not quite as bitter. >>


            I have two red oaks in my front yard, and an insane amount of acorns.
            Anything I can do with them, other than the amusement of watching the
            squirrels treat my yard as the Old Country Buffet?

            Laurensa
          • hillwizard2@aol.com
            In a message dated 11/17/2006 9:40:31 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, goofy4@comcast.net writes: I have two red oaks in my front yard, and an insane amount of
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 17, 2006
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              In a message dated 11/17/2006 9:40:31 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, goofy4@... writes:
              I have two red oaks in my front yard, and an insane amount of acorns.
              Anything I can do with them, other than the amusement of watching the
              squirrels treat my yard as the Old Country Buffet?

              Laurensa
              You can use acorns from the red oak too,  you just have to do more change of water to remove more tannins
               
              Mike the Hillwizard

              TANSTAAFL
            • Dianna Haught
              You can eat them, you just have to boil them more times. Keep boiling them and changing the water until no more tannins wash out. This can take several
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 17, 2006
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                You can eat them, you just have to boil them more times. Keep boiling them
                and changing the water until no more tannins wash out. This can take
                several hours. Or put in a basket in a swiftly moving stream and leave
                for a few days.
                Dianna


                >I have two red oaks in my front yard, and an insane amount of acorns.
                >Anything I can do with them, other than the amusement of watching the
                >squirrels treat my yard as the Old Country Buffet?
                >
                >Laurensa



                "Every word has three meanings and three interpretations." Irish Proverb
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