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Re: Period gourds and new database

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  • Marian Walke
    This is a great THANK YOU to all the wonderful people on these lists who gave me information on gourds and how to grow them. I now know much more about the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 5, 2006
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      This is a great THANK YOU to all the wonderful people on these lists who
      gave me information on gourds and how to grow them. I now know much
      more about the subject than before.

      I love these lists!

      I am now working on a database of period plants -- who grew what, when,
      and where. It is mostly based on data provided in John Harvey's
      Mediaeval Gardens, with additional information and pictures from various
      sources. It is searchable, so that one can find all the plants
      mentioned by a particular writer or all the writers who mention a
      particular plant (with both common and Latin names). It is my intention
      to make this available to all on these lists when it's finished. (I'm
      about half way through entering the data).

      I started this project because there were repeated requests for
      suggestions for a medieval garden, but of course there is no one answer.
      I thought perhaps knowing what plants were available to Hildegard von
      Bingen in Germany would be more useful for someone in the North, whereas
      people in the South might have better luck with plants Pietro de
      Crescenzi recommended growing in Italy.

      Currently each record contains common and Latin names, type of plant
      (tree, shrub, vine, etc), uses (culinary, medical, etc), the authors who
      mention it, and a couple of pictures. If anyone has suggestions for
      improving this plan, please let me know.

      --Old Marian
    • Rickard, Patty
      Bless your pea-pickin herbalist heart! Ceit ________________________________ From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Marian Walke Sent: Sun 11/5/2006
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 5, 2006
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        Bless your pea-pickin' herbalist heart!

        Ceit

        ________________________________

        From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Marian Walke
        Sent: Sun 11/5/2006 5:57 PM
        To: SCA_Gardening@yahoogroups.com; SCA-AuthenticCooks@yahoogroups.com; SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Period gourds and new database



        This is a great THANK YOU to all the wonderful people on these lists who
        gave me information on gourds and how to grow them. I now know much
        more about the subject than before.

        I love these lists!

        I am now working on a database of period plants -- who grew what, when,
        and where. It is mostly based on data provided in John Harvey's
        Mediaeval Gardens, with additional information and pictures from various
        sources. It is searchable, so that one can find all the plants
        mentioned by a particular writer or all the writers who mention a
        particular plant (with both common and Latin names). It is my intention
        to make this available to all on these lists when it's finished. (I'm
        about half way through entering the data).

        I started this project because there were repeated requests for
        suggestions for a medieval garden, but of course there is no one answer.
        I thought perhaps knowing what plants were available to Hildegard von
        Bingen in Germany would be more useful for someone in the North, whereas
        people in the South might have better luck with plants Pietro de
        Crescenzi recommended growing in Italy.

        Currently each record contains common and Latin names, type of plant
        (tree, shrub, vine, etc), uses (culinary, medical, etc), the authors who
        mention it, and a couple of pictures. If anyone has suggestions for
        improving this plan, please let me know.

        --Old Marian
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