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Transplanting Sage.

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  • Morgiana Cheyney
    Hello, I m hoping you all can help me out. My mother has two sage plants (Artemesia Oficinallis if I m not mistaken) in her yard that are not doing well. We
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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      Hello, I'm hoping you all can help me out. My mother has two sage
      plants (Artemesia Oficinallis if I'm not mistaken) in her yard that are
      not doing well. We have discovered that they need a bit more sun than
      they are currently getting. We have an excellent spot to move them
      too, but my question is when should we move them? Is it best to move
      them now, after the growing season, or in the spring when the new
      growth starts? Also, how much (and when) should we cut back to
      encourage new growth? Right now they have grown very spindley rather
      than bushy like the other sage plants in the area. I'm in the
      Outlands, Caerthe to be specific if there are regional conciderations
      to keep in mind.

      Thank you all in advance.

      Morgiana
    • Anwen Dutson
      OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you find in dry, arid areas. Salvia officinalis is culinary sage and the two should never be confused for
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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        OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you find in dry, arid areas. Salvia officinalis is culinary sage and the two should never be confused for each other. Whereas Salvia is edible, Artemesia should only be burned for ceremonial or relaxing benefits. I have a Salvia that I transplanted last spring when it was still a bit cool, with tremendous results. The poor thing was definitely getting its toes pinched in the old pot and as soon as I put it in a nice big planter, it took off like crazy. Its possible next spring, I will have to find something even larger for it.
         
        Be sure of what you have before you move it.
         
        Grannie

        Morgiana Cheyney <cltcros@...> wrote:
        Hello, I'm hoping you all can help me out. My mother has two sage
        plants (Artemesia Oficinallis if I'm not mistaken) in her yard that are
        not doing well. We have discovered that they need a bit more sun than
        they are currently getting. We have an excellent spot to move them
        too, but my question is when should we move them? Is it best to move
        them now, after the growing season, or in the spring when the new
        growth starts? Also, how much (and when) should we cut back to
        encourage new growth? Right now they have grown very spindley rather
        than bushy like the other sage plants in the area. I'm in the
        Outlands, Caerthe to be specific if there are regional conciderations
        to keep in mind.

        Thank you all in advance.

        Morgiana






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      • hillwizard2@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/25/2006 9:03:20 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mountain_hedgewitch@yahoo.com writes: OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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          In a message dated 9/25/2006 9:03:20 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mountain_hedgewitch@... writes:
          OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you find in dry, arid areas. Salvia officinalis is culinary sage and the two should never be confused for each other. Whereas Salvia is edible, Artemesia
          I do not think there is a Artemisia officinalis,  there many Artemisias [sagebrushes] but have never heard of A. officinalis.  Most people in the dry west know the difference between sage and sagebrush
           

          Mike the Hillwizard
          Figures don't lie,  But liars figure
        • Rickard, Patty
          ________________________________ From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of hillwizard2@aol.com Sent: Monday,
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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            From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of hillwizard2@...
            Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 12:48 PM
            To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Transplanting Sage.

             

            In a message dated 9/25/2006 9:03:20 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mountain_hedgewitch @... writes:

            OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you find in dry, arid areas. Salvia officinalis is culinary sage and the two should never be confused for each other. Whereas Salvia is edible, Artemesia

            I do not think there is a Artemisia officinalis,  there many Artemisias [sagebrushes] but have never heard of A. officinalis.  Most people in the dry west know the difference between sage and sagebrush

             

            I think officinalis is another name for dracunculus or tarragon. (I think officinale is another name for absintha or absinthium.)

             

            Ceit

             


            Mike the Hillwizard
            Figures don't lie,  But liars figure

          • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
            ... I suspect they might be Salvia officinalis? Normally, I d say don t move them until spring, but they might not come back, so it might be a good idea to
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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              > Hello, I'm hoping you all can help me out. My mother has two sage
              > plants (Artemesia Oficinallis if I'm not mistaken) in her yard that are
              > not doing well.

              I suspect they might be Salvia officinalis?

              Normally, I'd say don't move them until spring, but they might not come
              back, so it might be a good idea to move one now so that it has a
              chance.


              --
              -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
              "History doesn't always repeat itself. Sometimes it screams
              'Why don't you ever listen to me?' and lets fly with a club."
            • Amy Bernard
              I think *officinalis* is another name for *dracunculus* or tarragon*.* (I ... Actually *officinalis* is latin for shop . Anytime you see officinalis as the
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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                "I think officinalis is another name for dracunculus or tarragon. (I think officinale is another name for absintha or absinthium.)"

                Actually officinalis is latin for "shop".  Anytime you see officinalis as the species name, it is an indicator that it was a very important medicinal plant and could be found at the apothecary's shop.
                 
                Artemesia absinthium is wormwood.
                 
              • Rickard, Patty
                Sorry, I should have specified A. officianalis & A. officinale. Sorry if I confused you. Ceit ________________________________ From:
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 25, 2006
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                  Sorry, I should have specified A. officianalis & A. officinale. Sorry if I confused you.

                  Ceit

                  ________________________________

                  From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Amy Bernard
                  Sent: Mon 9/25/2006 9:11 PM
                  To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Transplanting Sage.







                  "I think officinalis is another name for dracunculus or tarragon. (I think officinale is another name for absintha or absinthium.)"



                  Actually officinalis is latin for "shop". Anytime you see officinalis as the species name, it is an indicator that it was a very important medicinal plant and could be found at the apothecary's shop.

                  Artemesia absinthium is wormwood.

                  Ameline

                  --
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                • Adhaniá
                  Thanks, Mike.....I went Wiki-wandering on your URL and looky what I found!! Who knew sage could be so interesting? LOL Adhaniá of Ols
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 26, 2006
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                    Thanks, Mike.....I went Wiki-wandering on your URL and looky what I found!!  Who knew sage could be so interesting?  LOL
                     
                    Adhaniá of Ols
                     

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 10:18
                    Subject: RE: [SCA-Herbalist] Transplanting Sage.

                     

                     


                    From: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com [mailto: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of hillwizard2@...
                    Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 12:48 PM
                    To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Transplanting Sage.

                     

                    In a message dated 9/25/2006 9:03:20 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, mountain_hedgewitch @... writes:

                    OK, Artemesia officinalis is sagebrush, the stuff you find in dry, arid areas. Salvia officinalis is culinary sage and the two should never be confused for each other. Whereas Salvia is edible, Artemesia

                    I do not think there is a Artemisia officinalis,  there many Artemisias [sagebrushes] but have never heard of A. officinalis.  Most people in the dry west know the difference between sage and sagebrush

                     

                    I think officinalis is another name for dracunculus or tarragon. (I think officinale is another name for absintha or absinthium.)

                     

                    Ceit

                     


                    Mike the Hillwizard
                    Figures don't lie,  But liars figure



                  • Adhaniá
                    Wow, that s interesting! I never knew that. I always thought it meant the official pharmacopoeia strain. Thanks!!! Adhaniá of Ols ... I think officinalis
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 26, 2006
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                      Wow, that's interesting!  I never knew that.  I always thought it meant the "official" pharmacopoeia strain.
                       
                      Thanks!!!
                       
                      Adhaniá of Ols
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      "I think officinalis is another name for dracunculus or tarragon. (I think officinale is another name for absintha or absinthium.)"

                      Actually officinalis is latin for "shop".  Anytime you see officinalis as the species name, it is an indicator that it was a very important medicinal plant and could be found at the apothecary's shop.
                       
                      Artemesia absinthium is wormwood.
                       


                    • Morgiana Cheyney
                      The plant is definately not Tarragon, and I am pretty sure it s not culinary sage either. Mom was going off of her memory as to what the name of the plant was
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 27, 2006
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                        The plant is definately not Tarragon, and I am pretty sure it's not
                        culinary sage either. Mom was going off of her memory as to what the
                        name of the plant was on the tag that came with it from the nursery.
                        Lucky for me, she never tosses those tags and I'll be able to check and
                        see exactly what it is this weekend when I visit her. I do know that
                        it's a fairly large bushy plant that has silvery grey stalks and leaves
                        with tiny purple flowers. Thank you so much for your help up to now.

                        YIS,
                        Morgiana
                      • Marigold930
                        Hi Morgiana, Could it be Russian Sage? http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1050.html If so here are some growing instructions.
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 28, 2006
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                          Hi Morgiana,

                          Could it be Russian Sage?
                          http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/1050.html
                          If so here are some growing instructions.
                          http://www.ehow.com/how_7104_grow-russian-sage.html
                          I don't know too much about it but I think it's mainly an ornamental
                          and not for culinary or medicinal purposes.

                          Best wishes,
                          Marigold

                          --- In SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com, "Morgiana Cheyney" <cltcros@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > The plant is definately not Tarragon, and I am pretty sure it's not
                          > culinary sage either.
                          >
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