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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] willow and aspirin

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  • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
    ... Another field that is related is archaeobotany. There s a graduate program in it: http://monkey.sbs.ohio-state.edu/textfiles/archaeobotany.htm -- --
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 14, 2006
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      > > Is there a
      > > branch of botany that has to do with historic names of plants and their
      > > uses? Can one study for a degree in botano-anthropology or the like?
      >
      > There's ethnobotany, which is (I assume) what you mean by
      > botano-anthropology, or at least pretty close. There's pharmacognosy,
      > which (at least when I took it) included a good deal of historical
      > information. There's History of Pharmacy itself. If you could find a
      > course in History of Pharmacognosy, that would be pretty close, but I
      > know of no such specific course.

      Another field that is related is archaeobotany.

      There's a graduate program in it:
      http://monkey.sbs.ohio-state.edu/textfiles/archaeobotany.htm

      --
      -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
      "America was not built on fear. America was built on courage, on
      imagination and an unbeatable determination to do the job at hand."
      -- Harry S. Truman
    • Ro Bourdeau
      Hmm, I ll have to check into that. I remember reading somewhere about one of the ancient Greeks prescribing willow for pain relief for women in labor. Of
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 16, 2006
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        Hmm, I'll have to check into that. I remember reading somewhere about one of the ancient Greeks "prescribing" willow for pain relief for women in labor. Of course, it's probably in one of the books that's in those boxes in the garage or attic (g). I have to better organize my home library.
         
        -A'isha (mka Ro).

        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne@...> wrote:
        FYI, the origin of the use of willow bark for pain can apparently be
        documented to the 1700s; a parson popularized it and now of course I
        can't remember who it was. He came up with the idea based on the theory
        of humors.

        --
        -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
        "America was not built on fear. America was built on courage, on
        imagination and an unbeatable determination to do the job at hand."
        -- Harry S. Truman

      • Brenda Billings
        It s hard to organize a library when you have two shelves worth of books for every shelf you have. anyone know any uses for wisteria? The ones around the
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 16, 2006
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          It's hard to organize a library when you have two shelves worth of books
          for every shelf you have.

          anyone know any uses for wisteria? The ones around the complex are
          going mad this year, and I'm wondering if there is anything I can do
          with them.

          Mieka

          Ro Bourdeau wrote:

          > Hmm, I'll have to check into that. I remember reading somewhere about
          > one of the ancient Greeks "prescribing" willow for pain relief for
          > women in labor. Of course, it's probably in one of the books that's in
          > those boxes in the garage or attic (g). I have to better organize my
          > home library.
          >
          > -A'isha (mka Ro).
        • otsisto
          Sorry behind on my reading. Actually the 1750 incident was someone trying to find a cheaper cure for malaria found that though w.willow did not cure patients
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 19, 2006
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            Sorry behind on my reading.

            Actually the 1750 incident was someone trying to find a cheaper cure for
            malaria found that though w.willow did not cure patients of malaria but
            helped in fever reduction and body aches.
            I vaguely remember some early herbal mentioning it's use for pain but I
            could be remember wrong.

            Lyse

            -----Original Message-----
            FYI, the origin of the use of willow bark for pain can apparently be
            documented to the 1700s; a parson popularized it and now of course I
            can't remember who it was. He came up with the idea based on the theory
            of humors.

            --
            -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika
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