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Re: Tinctures

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  • Beth Ann Bretter
    ... How does that work for you? Do you find the alcohol breaks down the lotion? Do you use a premade lotion or do you make your own? Does a tincture mixed
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 1 5:52 AM
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      > I use comfrey by itself sometimes (unstrained) or
      > add it into a
      > lotion.

      How does that work for you? Do you find the alcohol
      breaks down the lotion? Do you use a premade lotion
      or do you make your own?

      Does a tincture mixed with a lotion work better than a
      comfrey infused oil would?

      I'm fairly new to this but I'm *very* curious. %^>

      Peyton



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    • Eleyn Scrivener
      ... lotion. ... I make my own lotion and add the tincture to the water phase. The first one I tried was a comfrey/clove salve. If I remember correctly, I got
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 1 7:43 AM
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        Eleyn wrote:
        > > I use comfrey by itself sometimes (unstrained) or add it into a
        lotion.
        >
        <ladypeyton@y...> wrote:
        > How does that work for you? Do you find the alcohol
        > breaks down the lotion? Do you use a premade lotion
        > or do you make your own?

        I make my own lotion and add the tincture to the water phase. The
        first one I tried was a comfrey/clove salve. If I remember correctly,
        I got the recipe from this list. Here is the recipe:
        Beeswax (grated) 1 oz.
        Heat in a pan over low heat until wax has melted.
        Remove from heat. Place in a bowl and add:
        Clove infused Oil - 1/2 cup
        Comfrey Root Tincture - 1/4 cup

        I made it for a friend who uses it on her acne absesses and says it
        works wonderfully! I use it in my first aid kit. Oh, just remembered
        that I used 1/8 comfrey tinc and 1/8 cup propolis tinc. Then I added
        clove EO after it cooled a bit. Made a nice cream that was lighter
        than I expected. Seemed to absorb well so it wouldn't make a good
        barrier-type cream.

        > Does a tincture mixed with a lotion work better than a
        > comfrey infused oil would?

        Well, I don't know about "better"... depends on what result you are
        looking for.

        I'd use them both if possible (as above). I'm not very chemically
        minded (just mix things til they work) but alcohol, water and oil all
        bring out different properties from an herb, right? I would think
        using all of them would give you a more complete (stronger?) end
        result.

        > I'm fairly new to this but I'm *very* curious. %^>

        That curiosity will make you a seasoned veteran if you're not
        careful. LOL!

        Hope that helps!
        Eleyn
      • Eleyn Scrivener
        ... Sorry, just realized how unclear that was. In the case of the comfrey/clove salve... the tinctures ARE the water phase! : ) Eleyn
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 1 12:32 PM
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          > I make my own lotion and add the tincture to the water phase.

          Sorry, just realized how unclear that was. In the case of the
          comfrey/clove salve... the tinctures ARE the water phase! : )

          Eleyn
        • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
          ... Depends on the tincture. I make tinctures of lavender, rosemary and myrtle, or just rosemary-- these I use for scent, and also as a rubbing alcohol .
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 11 3:55 AM
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            Going back to an old topic:

            > I haven't made any tinctures yet, but I have a bunch of bottles saved up for
            > when I do.
            >
            > How would you use a tincture?

            Depends on the tincture. I make tinctures of lavender, rosemary and
            myrtle, or just rosemary-- these I use for scent, and also as a 'rubbing
            alcohol'.

            Tinctures can be used as a rubbing liniment, though you want to be a bit
            careful as alcohol dries the skin.

            They can also be used combined with water as a 'face splash' but I'm not
            sure that's a period use.

            Clove tincture in small doses is good for sore throats and mouth/throat
            infections.

            Since tinctures are alcohol based, they can have a cleansing effect on
            scrapes, etc. but they definitely burn!

            You can also use tinctures as a vehicle for extracting herbal/spice
            components for internal consumption, as in my carminative cordial
            (anti-gas spices)

            Tinctures can also have a warming and relaxing effect in shot-sized
            doses-- for instance, peppermint or ginger during a cold.

            In America, home herbalists often use tinctures where distilled waters
            might be indicated, as home alcohol distilling is not allowed in
            America.

            However, there are a number of period recipes that call for herbs or
            spices soaked or boiled in wine that are similar to tinctures.

            And of course you can sweeten tinctures to make cordials.

            >How do you know what proportions to use?

            Practice, mostly. I generally use no more than 1 part dried material to
            4 parts alcohol; with green herbs I fill the jar half to wholly full but
            don't pack it solid, then fill it with booze. Poke it with a chopstick
            or knife and/or shake to make sure there are no air pockets.

            >How
            > do you know when they are "done"?

            after 2-4 weeks, pour a bit out and test it to see if it is as strong as
            you want it. 4 weeks is usually what people say. However, I have a bad
            habit of leaving the herbs in there for longer- the spice you really
            want
            to avoid doing this with is cloves, it gets really, really bitter.

            >Do you strain them afterwards?

            I generally just sieve them-- use a sieve/strainer. Many people use
            coffee filters and/or muslin to strain. The more powdered your original
            ingredients are, the finer the straining/sieving needs to be.

            --
            -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
            "Information wants to be a Socialist... not a Communist or a
            Republican." - Karen Schneider
          • Suhayma@cox.net
            Speaking of tinctures, Your comment about clove tinctures made me wonder -- has anyone tried to make a Myrrh tincture? Myrrh is used world-wide (and for
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 11 9:30 AM
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              Speaking of tinctures,

              Your comment about clove tinctures made me wonder -- has anyone tried to make a Myrrh tincture? Myrrh is used world-wide (and for centuries) as an antimicrobial and antisceptic.

              Alexandra

              >
              > From: Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise <jenne@...>
              > Date: 2005/02/11 Fri AM 06:55:29 EST
              > To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Tinctures
              >
              > Going back to an old topic:

              > I haven't made any tinctures yet, but I have a bunch of bottles saved up for
              > when I do.
              >
              > How would you use a tincture?

              Depends on the tincture. I make tinctures of lavender, rosemary and
              myrtle, or just rosemary-- these I use for scent, and also as a 'rubbing
              alcohol'.

              Tinctures can be used as a rubbing liniment, though you want to be a bit
              careful as alcohol dries the skin.

              They can also be used combined with water as a 'face splash' but I'm not
              sure that's a period use.

              Clove tincture in small doses is good for sore throats and mouth/throat
              infections.

              Since tinctures are alcohol based, they can have a cleansing effect on
              scrapes, etc. but they definitely burn!

              You can also use tinctures as a vehicle for extracting herbal/spice
              components for internal consumption, as in my carminative cordial
              (anti-gas spices)

              Tinctures can also have a warming and relaxing effect in shot-sized
              doses-- for instance, peppermint or ginger during a cold.

              In America, home herbalists often use tinctures where distilled waters
              might be indicated, as home alcohol distilling is not allowed in
              America.

              However, there are a number of period recipes that call for herbs or
              spices soaked or boiled in wine that are similar to tinctures.

              And of course you can sweeten tinctures to make cordials.

              >How do you know what proportions to use?

              Practice, mostly. I generally use no more than 1 part dried material to
              4 parts alcohol; with green herbs I fill the jar half to wholly full but
              don't pack it solid, then fill it with booze. Poke it with a chopstick
              or knife and/or shake to make sure there are no air pockets.

              >How
              > do you know when they are "done"?

              after 2-4 weeks, pour a bit out and test it to see if it is as strong as
              you want it. 4 weeks is usually what people say. However, I have a bad
              habit of leaving the herbs in there for longer- the spice you really
              want
              to avoid doing this with is cloves, it gets really, really bitter.

              >Do you strain them afterwards?

              I generally just sieve them-- use a sieve/strainer. Many people use
              coffee filters and/or muslin to strain. The more powdered your original
              ingredients are, the finer the straining/sieving needs to be.

              --
              -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
              "Information wants to be a Socialist... not a Communist or a
              Republican." - Karen Schneider
            • Heather Josselyn
              I just got some roses for the holiday (lucky me!). Is there anything I can do with the petals that you recommend? Agatha of Carolingia >From: "Eleyn
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 15 6:26 AM
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                I just got some roses for the holiday (lucky me!). Is there anything I
                can do with the petals that you recommend?

                Agatha of Carolingia

                >From: "Eleyn Scrivener" <eleyn@...>
                >Reply-To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                >To: SCA-Herbalist@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Tinctures
                >Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 15:43:56 -0000
                >
                >
                >Eleyn wrote:
                > > > I use comfrey by itself sometimes (unstrained) or add it
                into a
                >lotion.
                > >
                ><ladypeyton@y...> wrote:
                > > How does that work for you? Do you find the alcohol
                > > breaks down the lotion? Do you use a premade lotion
                > > or do you make your own?
                >
                >I make my own lotion and add the tincture to the water phase. The
                >first one I tried was a comfrey/clove salve. If I remember correctly,
                >I got the recipe from this list. Here is the recipe:
                >Beeswax (grated) 1 oz.
                >Heat in a pan over low heat until wax has melted.
                >Remove from heat. Place in a bowl and add:
                >Clove infused Oil - 1/2 cup
                >Comfrey Root Tincture - 1/4 cup
                >
                >I made it for a friend who uses it on her acne absesses and says it
                >works wonderfully! I use it in my first aid kit. Oh, just remembered
                >that I used 1/8 comfrey tinc and 1/8 cup propolis tinc. Then I added
                >clove EO after it cooled a bit. Made a nice cream that was lighter
                >than I expected. Seemed to absorb well so it wouldn't make a good
                >barrier-type cream.
                >
                > > Does a tincture mixed with a lotion work better than a
                > > comfrey infused oil would?
                >
                >Well, I don't know about "better"... depends on what result
                you are
                >looking for.
                >
                >I'd use them both if possible (as above). I'm not very chemically
                >minded (just mix things til they work) but alcohol, water and oil all
                >bring out different properties from an herb, right? I would think
                >using all of them would give you a more complete (stronger?) end
                >result.
                >
                > > I'm fairly new to this but I'm *very* curious. %^>
                >
                >That curiosity will make you a seasoned veteran if you're not
                >careful. LOL!
                >
                >Hope that helps!
                >Eleyn
                >
                >
                >
              • KatRavenclaw@aol.com
                I use them to add to rose oil... but after its all done just to make it pretty. Commercial roses don t have as much scent as the varieties i use for oil. I
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 15 4:01 PM
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                  I use them to add to rose oil... but after its all done just to make it pretty. Commercial roses don't have as much scent as the varieties i use for oil. I like Honey Perfume for scent it is a beautiful hybrid tea on a creamy yellow color, delicate blossom and strongly scented
                   
                  KAT
                  catrionai nghean ui Darroagh
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