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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Re: Sage and Disocorides

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  • Shanalee C Hollingshead
    White Sage on this side of the continent (California) is indeed a true sage. It is Salvia apiana and is one of the sacred sages used by the Native Americans.
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 12, 2005
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      White Sage on this side of the continent (California) is indeed a true
      sage. It is Salvia apiana and is one of the sacred sages used by the
      Native Americans. It is still a new world plant though.
      Elysant
    • Ro Bourdeau
      Just curious, does anyone know what White Sage (Artemisia) likes in soil, climate and conditions? It sounds like it s more a Western plant but I m wondering if
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 13, 2005
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        Just curious, does anyone know what White Sage (Artemisia) likes in soil, climate and conditions? It sounds like it's more a Western plant but I'm wondering if it'll be happy here in CT. I have no problem with European Sage. It seems to be happy in my garden (even when I'm trying to move it to a better location, it keeps popping up in the old place).
         
        -A'isha (mka Ro)

        otsisto <otsisto@...> wrote:


        White sage is an Artemisia. European sage is Salvia officinalis. White sage
        has an aroma when burned. European sage stinks or as one person told me "it
        smells kind of like marijuana", in other word, it stinks. :).....
        Okay enough rambling,
        Lyse


      • Apollonia de Avena
        I ve had luck with it here in South Texas. I don t know how it would do in CT. It really likes dry acidic soil and lots af neglect. The soil here is mostly
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 13, 2005
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          I've had luck with it here in South Texas.  I don't know how it would do in CT.  It really likes dry acidic soil and lots af neglect.  The soil here is mostly sandy with clumps of dark clay.  It gets scorching hot in the summer and the artemisia loves that.  It would be tricky to mimic those conditions where you live, but I don't know how adaptable the plant is.  It may do well in multiple types of conditions. 
          Hope that helps,
          Apollonia

          Ro Bourdeau <moose.mom@...> wrote:
          Just curious, does anyone know what White Sage (Artemisia) likes in soil, climate and conditions? It sounds like it's more a Western plant but I'm wondering if it'll be happy here in CT. I have no problem with European Sage. It seems to be happy in my garden (even when I'm trying to move it to a better location, it keeps popping up in the old place).
           
          -A'isha (mka Ro)

          otsisto <otsisto@...> wrote:


          White sage is an Artemisia. European sage is Salvia officinalis. White sage
          has an aroma when burned. European sage stinks or as one person told me "it
          smells kind of like marijuana", in other word, it stinks. :).....
          Okay enough rambling,
          Lyse




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        • lilinah@earthlink.net
          ... The White Sage i ve seen growing in the foothills and low mountains of Southern California is Artemisia ludoviciana. It is shrubby with somewhat woody
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 13, 2005
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            Shanalee C Hollingshead <shana_c@...> wrote:
            >White Sage on this side of the continent (California) is indeed a true
            >sage. It is Salvia apiana and is one of the sacred sages used by the
            >Native Americans. It is still a new world plant though.
            >
            >Elysant

            The White Sage i've seen growing in the foothills and low mountains
            of Southern California is Artemisia ludoviciana. It is shrubby with
            somewhat woody stems. The leaves are small and a light grey-green.
            I'm no botanist, so i can't describe the leaves appropriately, but
            they had what i'll call a notched edge (i'm sure there's a proper
            term). Its range extends through much of the western US.

            My understanding was that it was sometimes used as smudge by some
            Native Americans.

            One website i visited said that High Desert Sage was Artemisia
            tridentata, and "is the traditional desert sage used in Native
            American incense. Often confused with white sage, which was used
            primarily by southwestern tribes during sweat lodges." How accurate
            this is can be debated. It also doesn't specify which "white sage"
            they mean.

            Both Salvia apiana and Artemisia ludiviciana are called White Sage.

            Trying to find out just which "sage", whether a Salvia or an
            Artemisia, was used as a Native American sacred herb isn't easy. I
            suspect that ultimately it would vary from region to region depending
            on which plants grew there. Also there were trade routes for sacred
            and other desirable items, dried herbs among them.

            Anahita
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