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Spirits and the Law

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  • Rebecca Eden
    What about the use of wood alcohol...cannot be consumed and with its low volitile point can be theoretically evaporated w/out loss of desired oils being
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 2, 2004
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      What about the use of wood alcohol...cannot be consumed and with its low volitile point can be theoretically evaporated w/out loss of desired oils being lost...

      or what about isopropl alchhol...the stuff commonly known as rubbing alcohol. 

      These options might extract different portions of the plant but considering the silliness of the laws concerning ethanol...what about if the ethanol was purchased from a chemical supply for extraction...has anyone looked into how the chemical industry is limited...there are plenty of items that are sold in ethanol suspension/solution that cannot realy be applied for in the way that drinking spirits are...research materials and all.  And these things are shipped all the time.

      Not that I have any idea where to even start looking for these answers...but aldrich labs might know something...since they are a large specialty chemical supply...the milwaukee offices do the special orders.

       

      good luck,

      Kalliera


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    • Beth Ann Bretter
      ... Many hardware shops carry denatured alcohol that may be used in perfume, incense & soap making. I know that as a beginning merchant who specializes in
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 3, 2004
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        > What about the use of wood alcohol...cannot be
        > consumed and with its low volitile point can be
        > theoretically evaporated w/out loss of desired oils
        > being lost...
        >
        > or what about isopropl alchhol...the stuff commonly
        > known as rubbing alcohol.
        >
        > These options might extract different portions of
        > the plant but considering the silliness of the laws
        > concerning ethanol...what about if the ethanol was
        > purchased from a chemical supply for
        > extraction...has anyone looked into how the chemical
        > industry is limited...there are plenty of items that
        > are sold in ethanol suspension/solution that cannot
        > realy be applied for in the way that drinking
        > spirits are...research materials and all. And these
        > things are shipped all the time.

        Many hardware shops carry denatured alcohol that may
        be used in perfume, incense & soap making. I know
        that as a beginning merchant who specializes in
        perfumes, lotions and other uses for Essential Oils
        that per FDA regulations I am limited to using
        denatured alcohol in my product line. As far as
        industry goes; I got the following from
        http://www.atf.gov/alcohol/info/faq/spirits.htm It's
        mostly about alcohol and taxation but gives a good
        idea about how the US government pigeonholes different
        kinds of alcohol.

        "S5: How can I use distilled spirits in an industrial
        product or process without having to pay the excise
        tax?

        The Internal Revenue Code provides three methods for
        doing this. First, spirits that are denatured (i.e.,
        treated with substances to make them unsuitable for
        human beverage consumption) may be used free of tax by
        a person who holds an industrial use permit. However,
        no permit is needed to use completely denatured
        alcohol or an approved article made from denatured
        spirits. Denatured spirits are suitable in a wide
        range of industrial applications, from mouthwash to
        fuel, etc., but not in products for internal human
        consumption, unless the spirits are removed. Second,
        undenatured tax-free alcohol may be used by persons
        such as research laboratories, hospitals,
        universities, and government agencies, if they hold an
        industrial use permit. Undenatured tax-free alcohol is
        prohibited from use in the manufacture of any product
        for sale. Third, undenatured distilled spirits on
        which the tax has been paid may be used in the
        manufacture of medicines, medicinal preparations, food
        products, flavors, flavoring extracts, and perfume;
        and then drawback may be claimed. This drawback is
        similar to a refund; however, the drawback rate is $1
        per proof gallon less than the applicable tax rate.
        The Government keeps the difference. For further
        information on using distilled spirits in any of these
        ways, please contact the ATF National Revenue Center
        at (800) 398-2282."

        How odd to be replying to "alcohol and the law"
        questions on a non Brewing list. ;^>

        Peyton




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