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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Potpourri WAS Re:Location Question and Other Questions

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  • Cat>^-.-^<
    Hi Sharon: I managed to find this (period?) recipe: To make a perfume to stand in a room. Take 2 or 3 quarts of roses buds or the leaves of damask roses, &
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 31, 2004
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      Hi Sharon:
      I managed to find this (period?) recipe:

      "To make a perfume to stand in a room. Take 2 or 3 quarts of roses buds or
      the leaves of damask roses, & put them in a pot with bay salt, 3 or 4 grayns
      of muske, & as much of amberreece, 20 or 30 drops of oyle of rodium, a
      little benjamin & storeax & beat together, & 2 or 3 spoonfuls of rosewater.
      put all these together in a cheyney pot, or any other that is handsom, &
      keep it allwayes close covered. but when you have a mind to have your room
      sweet, you m(ay take off the) cover."
      --from: "A Booke of Sweetmeats", 17th century (a.k.a. "Martha Washington's
      Booke of Cookery")

      Scented flowers and herbs were dried and sewn into fabric "sweet bags", used
      to keep away moths and perfume clothes and linens, but this is the earliest
      reference I could find for open or closed containers of preserved flowers.
      Recipes of this type became more popular towards the mid 1700's to late
      1800's, where fresh flower petals, spices and "bay salt" were layered in
      ornate containers and left to ferment ("pot pourri" means literally "rotten
      pot").

      Freedictionary.com says Bay Salt is "Salt which has been obtained from sea
      water, by evaporation in shallow pits or basins, by the heat of the sun; the
      large crystalline salt of commerce."

      Hope this helps! :-)
      Cat

      > 3) my 'dream recipe' is one for potpourri, but I'm about given up
      > looking; I don't know that they had potpourri in period. I'm still
      > working, in a desultory fashion, on pomanders, though.
      > ***It seems to me that one period version of potpourri were the various
      herb
      > mixtures strewn on the floors. And if you should happen to keep yours in
      a
      > bowl prior to strewing it on the floor, who are we to say :-)?
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