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Required courses for RUM degrees

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  • Christine Seelye-King
    Greetings to all those within this e-realm interested in the Culinary Sciences, (My apologies for those of you receiving this more than once), I am working on
    Message 1 of 7 , May 13, 2004
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      Greetings to all those within this e-realm interested in the Culinary
      Sciences,
      (My apologies for those of you receiving this more than once),
      I am working on setting up degrees within the School of Culinary Sciences.
      I am trying to figure out how many classes should be required, how many of
      them should be mandatory vs. electives, and what those mandatory classes
      should be.
      Here is the breakdown I have so far:

      Students enrolled in the School of Culinary Sciences may receive any of the
      following degrees based on their choice of studies:
      (1) Scholar of Medieval Foods & Food Pathways- classes centering on the
      study of SCA Period food, availability, trade routes, regional differences
      (2) Scholar of Medieval Feasting - classes centering on SCA Period Food
      Preparation, Feasting and Fasting, Period Techniques, SCA Feastcratting,
      etc.
      (3) Scholar of Botanical Studies - classes centering on SCA Period use of
      Herbal Medicine, Period Herbals, Gardens and Gardening, should include some
      practicums
      (4) Scholar of Brewing and Vintning

      So Degree #1 would be for the person who studied the foods and the history,
      but not necessarily the preparation side of things. Required courses could
      include Feast Appreciation, a class on spices and seasonings, a class on the
      spice trade such as the Silk Road or Urban Spice Merchants, a class on the
      introduction of various foods to European cultures throughout our time
      period; electives on specific foods, guilds, agriculture, etc. Electives
      could specialize on certain foods, guilds, regions, dietary requirements,
      the Humoral Theory, etc.

      Degree #2 could include the person who is intereted in studying the dining
      habits of period, and can include the cook who actively re-creates those
      foods. Required - Feast Appreciation, SCA Feastcratting (a class or one [1]
      feast cooked), Service Methods/Banquet Officers, electives on Feast and Fast
      Days/Holiday Observances, technique classes/workshops on specific topics
      such as subtleties, sauces, butchering, sugar creations (sugar plate,
      marzipan, etc.), Effective Hall Stewarding, etc. Note - this is not a
      degree for how many feasts you cook. (Just because you have cooked a feast,
      doesn't mean you know the difference between period and non-period food).
      The SCA Feastcratting class or actually cooking a feast is only good for one
      credit toward this degree. Additional specialization in this area can be
      pursued with classes such as Budgeting and Planning, Basic Feast Planning,
      Redaction, Scaling Up, etc.

      Degree #3 includes those pursuing the use of herbs in period, History of
      Medicine, agriculture, gardeners/horticulturists, and perhaps even animal
      husbandry, although that gets away from Botanics and into other areas
      depending on what's being bred - horses wouldn't be included (they can get a
      degree from the Equestrian College), but Beekeeping might - especially if
      study work is tied into the surrounding fields the bees gather pollen from.
      So Required courses might include History of Herbals, Period Garden Design,
      (I could use suggestions for other required Herbal courses), electives could
      go into the use of various herbs, period medical practices using herbs, the
      study of the Humoral Theory (this could also be done with degrees #1 & 2),
      period farming/crops, Honey produced from clover fields as compared to
      wildflower, etc.

      Degree #4 is out of my area of expertise, and is not being worked on at this
      time. I'd love suggestions for what the brewers out there would consider
      good required courses as well as elective ideas.

      What I'd like is for folks to tell me what they think should absolutely be
      required for a certain degree. If you specialize in Herbs and were going to
      certify that Lord Y had a working knowledge of herbs in period (not to
      practice with, but could be able to write a paper or present a class with
      appropriate references and enough knowledge to be a reliable source), what
      would you want to make sure he had at least been exposed to? (Keeping in
      mind the classes are usually 1 hour).
      Thanks for any input, feel free to respond to me privately if you wish -
      kingstaste@...
      Thanks,
      Mistress Christianna MacGrain,
      Dean of the School of Culinary Sciences,
      Royal University of Meridies
    • Magnus Hedemark
      ... [snip] ... Check out the Celtic Cock guild for some details on this. We just had a business meeting last night to fine tune our ranking system. Basically
      Message 2 of 7 , May 13, 2004
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        On Thu, 13 May 2004, Christine Seelye-King wrote:

        > (4) Scholar of Brewing and Vintning
        [snip]
        > Degree #4 is out of my area of expertise, and is not being worked on at this
        > time.  I'd love suggestions for what the brewers out there would consider
        > good required courses as well as elective ideas.

        Check out the Celtic Cock guild for some details on this. We just had a
        business meeting last night to fine tune our ranking system. Basically
        there is a combination of two things:

        1) "Just do it". Make beer, get the other guild members to drink it
        without comparing it to a wet gym sock. Each beer/wine/mead/cordial/etc
        gets you closer to a needed number of credits for each of the five
        disciplines we cover.

        2) "Just teach it". Our guild, and the SCA as a larger organization,
        exists as an educational vehicle. Guild members must write & teach
        classes both for the local events as well as for larger SCA events in
        order to ascend the ranks and achieve mastery.

        I think that this model is challenging but at the same time enriching to
        the student and to the broader community. It gives the ranks meaning. Of
        course this isn't yet proven out so take it with a grain of salt.
      • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
        ... How many courses are usually required for other degrees? -- -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@fiedlerfamily.net Once there was The
        Message 3 of 7 , May 13, 2004
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          > I am working on setting up degrees within the School of Culinary Sciences.
          > I am trying to figure out how many classes should be required, how many of
          > them should be mandatory vs. electives, and what those mandatory classes
          > should be.

          How many courses are usually required for other degrees?

          --
          -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
          "Once there was The People--Terror gave it birth;
          Once there was The People and it made a Hell of Earth...
          Once there was The People--it shall never be again!" -- Kipling
        • Taiz Mystic
          Damn I wish I lived in your area now..*L* I love to learn most of that. Damiana The Iberian Vixen M lady o the CLEAVAGE! According to Bronze Rogue The
          Message 4 of 7 , May 13, 2004
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            Damn I wish I lived in your area now..*L* I love to learn most of that.
             
            Damiana
            The Iberian Vixen
            M'lady o'the CLEAVAGE!
            According to Bronze Rogue
             
            The International Wenches Guild
            Local 57 Member #2391
            Magnus Melior Celeris Amplius
            "Bigger, Better, Faster, More."
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004 3:39 PM
            Subject: [SCA-Herbalist] Required courses for RUM degrees

            Greetings to all those within this e-realm interested in the Culinary
            Sciences,
            (My apologies for those of you receiving this more than once),
                  I am working on setting up degrees within the School of Culinary Sciences.
            I am trying to figure out how many classes should be required, how many of
            them should be mandatory vs. electives, and what those mandatory classes
            should be.
            Here is the breakdown I have so far:

            Students enrolled in the School of Culinary Sciences may receive any of the
            following degrees based on their choice of studies:
            (1) Scholar of Medieval Foods & Food Pathways- classes centering on the
            study of SCA Period food, availability, trade routes, regional differences
            (2) Scholar of Medieval Feasting - classes centering on SCA Period Food
            Preparation, Feasting and Fasting, Period Techniques, SCA Feastcratting,
            etc.
            (3) Scholar of Botanical Studies - classes centering on SCA Period use of
            Herbal Medicine, Period Herbals, Gardens and Gardening, should include some
            practicums
            (4) Scholar of Brewing and Vintning

            So Degree #1 would be for the person who studied the foods and the history,
            but not necessarily the preparation side of things.  Required courses could
            include Feast Appreciation, a class on spices and seasonings, a class on the
            spice trade such as the Silk Road or Urban Spice Merchants, a class on the
            introduction of various foods to European cultures throughout our time
            period; electives on specific foods, guilds, agriculture, etc.  Electives
            could specialize on certain foods, guilds, regions, dietary requirements,
            the Humoral Theory, etc.

            Degree #2 could include the person who is intereted in studying the dining
            habits of period, and can include the cook who actively re-creates those
            foods.  Required - Feast Appreciation, SCA Feastcratting (a class or one [1]
            feast cooked), Service Methods/Banquet Officers, electives on Feast and Fast
            Days/Holiday Observances, technique classes/workshops on specific topics
            such as subtleties, sauces, butchering, sugar creations (sugar plate,
            marzipan, etc.), Effective Hall Stewarding, etc.  Note - this is not a
            degree for how many feasts you cook.  (Just because you have cooked a feast,
            doesn't mean you know the difference between period and non-period food).
            The SCA Feastcratting class or actually cooking a feast is only good for one
            credit toward this degree.  Additional specialization in this area can be
            pursued with classes such as Budgeting and Planning, Basic Feast Planning,
            Redaction, Scaling Up, etc.

            Degree #3 includes those pursuing the use of herbs in period, History of
            Medicine, agriculture, gardeners/horticulturists, and perhaps even animal
            husbandry, although that gets away from Botanics and into other areas
            depending on what's being bred - horses wouldn't be included (they can get a
            degree from the Equestrian College), but Beekeeping might - especially if
            study work is tied into the surrounding fields the bees gather pollen from.
            So Required courses might include History of Herbals, Period Garden Design,
            (I could use suggestions for other required Herbal courses), electives could
            go into the use of various herbs, period medical practices using herbs, the
            study of the Humoral Theory (this could also be done with degrees #1 & 2),
            period farming/crops, Honey produced from clover fields as compared to
            wildflower, etc.

            Degree #4 is out of my area of expertise, and is not being worked on at this
            time.  I'd love suggestions for what the brewers out there would consider
            good required courses as well as elective ideas.

            What I'd like is for folks to tell me what they think should absolutely be
            required for a certain degree.  If you specialize in Herbs and were going to
            certify that Lord Y had a working knowledge of herbs in period (not to
            practice with, but could be able to write a paper or present a class with
            appropriate references and enough knowledge to be a reliable source), what
            would you want to make sure he had at least been exposed to? (Keeping in
            mind the classes are usually 1 hour).
            Thanks for any input, feel free to respond to me privately if you wish -
            kingstaste@...
            Thanks,
            Mistress Christianna MacGrain,
            Dean of the School of Culinary Sciences,
            Royal University of Meridies



            -------------------------------------------------------------
            SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
            and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
            information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.

            Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
            Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
            [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]



          • kingstaste@mindspring.com
            As I said, it varies. As many as 22 for the Middle eastern, as few as 10 for Equestrian. Seems like 15 is a good median, but again I want to make sure I
            Message 5 of 7 , May 13, 2004
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              As I said, it varies.  As many as 22 for the Middle eastern, as few as 10 for Equestrian.  Seems like 15 is a good median, but again I want to make sure I really have 5 classes I want to be required before setting arbitrary numbers.
              Christianna
              >      I am working on setting up degrees within the School of Culinary Sciences.
              > I am trying to figure out how many classes should be required, how many of
              > them should be mandatory vs. electives, and what those mandatory classes
              > should be.

              How many courses are usually required for other degrees?

              -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
            • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
              Bear in mind that my kingdom doesn t have anything like this, so I m just thinking in non-SCA academic terms ... - Introduction to Culinary History (Overview)
              Message 6 of 7 , May 14, 2004
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                Bear in mind that my kingdom doesn't have anything like this, so I'm just
                thinking in non-SCA academic terms

                > Students enrolled in the School of Culinary Sciences may receive any of the
                > following degrees based on their choice of studies:
                > (1) Scholar of Medieval Foods & Food Pathways- classes centering on the
                > study of SCA Period food, availability, trade routes, regional differences

                - Introduction to Culinary History (Overview)
                - Medicine and Diet
                - History of Raw Ingredients
                - Food preparation in period
                - Herbs and Seasonings
                - Med/Ren Food Texts
                - Recreating foods from period recipes
                - two classes in regional cooking

                > (2) Scholar of Medieval Feasting - classes centering on SCA Period Food
                > Preparation, Feasting and Fasting, Period Techniques, SCA Feastcratting,
                > etc.

                - Introduction to Culinary History
                - History of Raw Ingredients
                - Food preparation in period
                - Basic Kitchen Safety
                - Herbs and Seasonings
                - recreating foods from period recipes
                - Food Presentation in Period
                - Organizing an SCA kitchen 101
                - Running a kitchen: budgets, material and staff management

                > (3) Scholar of Botanical Studies - classes centering on SCA Period use of
                > Herbal Medicine, Period Herbals, Gardens and Gardening, should include some
                > practicums

                - Medicine and Diet
                - medieval gardens 101
                - Period Herbal preparations
                - Overview of Agriculture
                - Botanical/Herbal sources
                - Basic gardening
                - basic botany for the scadian
                - History of Raw ingredients
                - at least two in depth resource classes (on a particular area/author)

                --
                -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
                "Once there was The People--Terror gave it birth;
                Once there was The People and it made a Hell of Earth...
                Once there was The People--it shall never be again!" -- Kipling
              • kingstaste@mindspring.com
                Welcome to the list, and thank you for your suggestions. The Royal University Degrees differ from a Guild format in that they are not aimed at hands-on
                Message 7 of 7 , May 23, 2004
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                  Welcome to the list, and thank you for your suggestions.  The Royal University Degrees differ from a Guild format in that they are not aimed at hands-on production, but rather the study of the topic in question.  So for Herbs, the study topics are along the lines of History of Herbals, Period Herbalists, Historical Herbal Uses, etc.  Last week, before you joined the list, we had a discussion about how the degree system does NOT produce anyone with an ability to practice on a clinical basis. 
                  The same would hold true for the Brewing and Vintning.  I am looking for suggestions along the lines of 'this is what you would need to know about the ways beverages were brewed in period; the historical aspects of alcohol production, how alcoholic beverages figured into trade and commerce, etc.'.  I would be interested to see if your local guild had a list of classes that they would consider necessary (or even an outline of such from a single class) for someone to start out learning about making brewed beverages in period vs. modern techniques. 
                  Thanks for your comments!
                  Mistress Christianna MacGrain
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Magnus Hedemark [mailto:magnus@...]
                  Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004 4:13 PM
                  To: SCAHerbalist
                  Subject: Re: [SCA-Herbalist] Required courses for RUM degrees

                  On Thu, 13 May 2004, Christine Seelye-King wrote:

                  > (4) Scholar of Brewing and Vintning
                  [snip]
                  > Degree #4 is out of my area of expertise, and is not being worked on at this
                  > time.  I'd love suggestions for what the brewers out there would consider
                  > good required courses as well as elective ideas.

                  Check out the Celtic Cock guild for some details on this.  We just had a
                  business meeting last night to fine tune our ranking system.  Basically
                  there is a combination of two things:

                  1) "Just do it".  Make beer, get the other guild members to drink it
                  without comparing it to a wet gym sock.  Each beer/wine/mead/cordial/etc
                  gets you closer to a needed number of credits for each of the five
                  disciplines we cover.

                  2) "Just teach it".  Our guild, and the SCA as a larger organization,
                  exists as an educational vehicle.  Guild members must write & teach
                  classes both for the local events as well as for larger SCA events in
                  order to ascend the ranks and achieve mastery.

                  I think that this model is challenging but at the same time enriching to
                  the student and to the broader community.  It gives the ranks meaning.  Of
                  course this isn't yet proven out so take it with a grain of salt.




                  -------------------------------------------------------------
                  SCA-Herbalist disclaimer: This list is primarily for discussion of medieval
                  and renaissance herbalism and herbalism in the SCA. Please verify any health
                  information in other sources and/or with a qualified health professional.

                  Get medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.MedievalMart.com/
                  Sponsored by House Wyvern Hall, BBM, East Kingdom, SCA
                  [Email to SCA-Herbalist-unsubscribe@egroups.com to leave this list]


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