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Re: [SCA-Herbalist] what to grow

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  • newbrg@aol.com
    ... I ve been told (haven t yet grown an adult plant to be able to test this) that if you plant it in place, they will leave it alone, but if you transplant
    Message 1 of 5 , May 22, 2000
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      On the subject of catnip, we said:

      > >(Ask me about the catnip I planted a whole packet > of, in March, and of
      >> which I now have one half-inch high seedling. It
      >> hasn't even put out true leaves.)
      >> Johanna >>

      >LOL. Catnip is the one mint I can't get to grow. It >may have something to do
      >with my 4 furry garden assistants that decide to roll >around in it as soon as
      >it gets above ground. And they act like piranha if I >put actual plants out.
      >Oh well, at least we all enjoy the herb garden.
      >Lady Aelfwyn

      I've been told (haven't yet grown an adult plant to be able to test this) that if you plant it in place, they will leave it alone, but if you transplant it, they will go crazy and destroy it. I think, myself, this probably depends somewhat on the cat --

      However, I moved the pot to a different window, with the result that my "original" seedling now has true leaves and half a dozen more have sprouted. I don't have many/any really sunny windows -- this one has a grow-light on a timer.

      The lemon basil hasn't shown up YET. (Planted same time).

      Johanna
    • Donna Kenton
      ... This has been the experience of everyone I know who has ever planted it, including my herbal teacher. The reasoning is that the action of transplanting
      Message 2 of 5 , May 22, 2000
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        >I've been told (haven't yet grown an adult plant to be able to test this)
        >that if you plant it in place, they will leave it alone, but if you
        >transplant it, they will go crazy and destroy it.

        This has been the experience of everyone I know who has ever planted it,
        including my herbal teacher. The reasoning is that the action of
        transplanting (touching and rubbing the leaves and plant) causes the
        fragrance to be released. If you plant it in the spot you intend to keep
        it, that doesn't happen.

        I haven't introduced myself yet, and I ought to. I'm Baroness Rosalind
        Bennett, of the East Kingdom, and have been interested in herbalism for
        quite some time, off and on. I took an apprenticeship with a local herbal
        teacher (she calls herself a wise woman) a few years ago, and it really
        changed the way I looked at things, not just herbs. I was particularly
        interested in the medieval uses of the herbs, and medieval herbal medicine,
        such as a lady of the house might know. I've taught at SCA universities
        here in the East, though that was some time ago.

        Although I have a rather extensive library on the subject, I don't use it
        much. I have a brown thumb, and can't grow weeds. I've tinkered with
        herbal salves and such that I know are safe and could have been period
        (proper techniques and materials). I'm trying hard to get my hands on a
        copy of Conrad Gesner's "Newe Iewell of Health" which was reprinted in
        facsimile form in the late 1970s (I think). I couldn't afford it when I
        first saw it, and now I can't find it anywhere, not even on
        Bookfinder.com. I have several pages photocopied from it, but I want the book!

        Very enjoyable forum here! My thanks to everyone!

        Rosalind




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        Visit my web page! http://www.dabbler.com
      • Jeanie Decker
        Johanna writes (regarding catnip): I ve been told (haven t yet grown an adult plant to be able to test this) that if you plant it in place, they will leave it
        Message 3 of 5 , May 22, 2000
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          Johanna writes (regarding catnip): "I've been told (haven't yet grown an
          adult plant to be able to test this) that if you plant it in place, they
          will leave it alone, but if you transplant it, they will go crazy and
          destroy it. I think, myself, this probably depends somewhat on the cat --"

          I wish it were true, but it isn't. My cats know catnip. Whether I've
          transplanted seedlings or started the seeds in an outdoor patch, it's still
          their Plant of Paradise. They don't mean to destroy it, but since the
          ritual of worship apparently entails laying full length across the plant
          then wrapping the branches down around their bodies then rolling....

          So I switched to growing it in pots, figuring the worst they could do would
          be to nibble at the leaves. But as uncomfortable as it must be, they still
          have to lay in it and roll (then they fall out of the pot 'cuz they're so
          blissed out). Now I grow it in pots on shelves they can't reach.


          Jeanie
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