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Flavored oils and food poisoning!

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  • mneumark@hotmail.com
    Hello All! I made some flavored oils about two weeks ago and I just today saw an article on how dangerous flavored oils can be. I guess bochalism (I apologize
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
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      Hello All!

      I made some flavored oils about two weeks ago and I just today saw an
      article on how dangerous flavored oils can be. I guess bochalism (I
      apologize for my terrible spelling) can grow in them? Is this true?
      Now I'm afraid of giving my hard work to anyone. Help! What should
      I do?

      --Artemesia
    • Jenne Heise
      ... If they are garlic-flavored oils and have been stored at room temperature, throw them out. Garlic-in-oil mixes are the ones that have caused the reported
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
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        > I made some flavored oils about two weeks ago and I just today saw an
        > article on how dangerous flavored oils can be. I guess bochalism (I
        > apologize for my terrible spelling) can grow in them? Is this true?
        > Now I'm afraid of giving my hard work to anyone. Help! What should
        > I do?

        If they are garlic-flavored oils and have been stored at room temperature,
        throw them out.
        Garlic-in-oil mixes are the ones that have caused the reported cases of
        botulism.

        Botulism grows under low acid, anerobic conditions, so it can grow in herb
        oils if it gets in there, especially if the item is not kept refrigerated.
        The recommendation is to make all herbal oils fresh at the point of use
        and keep leftovers under refrigeration for no more than 10 days, then
        discard.

        Flavored vinegars, because of the acid content, are safer.

        Herb-infused oils can be repurposed for external use if appropriate.

        Thanks for asking, I forgot to put that in my herbal preparations handout!

        --
        Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
        disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
        "Let's by all means grieve together. But let's not be stupid together. A
        few shreds of historical awareness might help us understand what has just
        happened, and what may continue to happen." - Susan Sontag, The New Yorker
      • Cathleen Mcintire
        Hmm, a thought that comes to mind would be something I do with home canning - boil all your containers first - this will at least kill the bacteria that is in
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2001
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          Hmm, a thought that comes to mind would be something I
          do with home canning - boil all your containers first
          - this will at least kill the bacteria that is in the
          jar. If you can actually treat them like something
          you're canning and add citric acid to them, they
          should be able to be canned like any other substance,
          I imagine. Just a thought.

          Aine of Glencoe
          KO Meridies

          > Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 21:06:05 -0000
          > From: mneumark@...

          > Hello All!
          >
          > I made some flavored oils about two weeks ago and I
          > just today saw an
          > article on how dangerous flavored oils can be. I
          > guess bochalism (I
          > apologize for my terrible spelling) can grow in
          > them? Is this true?
          > Now I'm afraid of giving my hard work to anyone.
          > Help! What should
          > I do?
          >
          > --Artemesia

          __________________________________________________
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          Find a job, post your resume.
          http://careers.yahoo.com
        • Jenne Heise
          ... Apparently the concern is that botulism spores might be on the plant material. Adding citric acid to the oil mixture (vinegar or lemon juice) is something
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 2, 2001
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            > Hmm, a thought that comes to mind would be something I
            > do with home canning - boil all your containers first
            > - this will at least kill the bacteria that is in the
            > jar. If you can actually treat them like something
            > you're canning and add citric acid to them, they
            > should be able to be canned like any other substance,
            > I imagine. Just a thought.

            Apparently the concern is that botulism spores might be on the plant
            material. Adding citric acid to the oil mixture (vinegar or lemon juice)
            is something that commercial producers are supposed to do, so it's
            probably a good idea. One Cooperative Extension site says that dried herbs
            pose less of a problem than fresh:
            http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09340.html
            But there is apparently still a potential for problems.

            If I were making oil for my personal internal use, I'd probably use dried
            herbs and some acid additive, and store it in the refrigerator. But I
            wouldn't give it away or serve it to others, just in case.

            --
            Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
            disclaimer: i speak for no-one and no-one speaks for me.
            "Let's by all means grieve together. But let's not be stupid together. A
            few shreds of historical awareness might help us understand what has just
            happened, and what may continue to happen." - Susan Sontag, The New Yorker
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