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Re: [SCA-Garb] Need quick tip on centerfront points/gores

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  • Coblaith Mhuimhneach
    ... For future reference, the easiest way to get one that lies nice and flat at the tip using the machine is to begin by laying the gore along the cut edge of
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 1, 2006
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      Chris Catalfamo wrote:
      > . . .I need a quick tip on center front gores.. . .Have got it machine
      > sewn up to about an inch from the point. What do I do now?. . .I
      > already had to take it out and do it over. . .

      For future reference, the easiest way to get one that lies nice and
      flat at the tip using the machine is to begin by laying the gore along
      the cut edge of the body panel, putting the point a scant seam
      allowance above the top of the slit, and hand-sewing the first couple
      of inches on that side, then pivoting the gore around the top stitch so
      that it lies along the other cut edge and doing the same, BEFORE
      finishing the seams mechanically.

      Beginning from where you are now, you might prefer to attempt machine
      sewing to the tip <http://www.vertetsable.com/demos_goresgussets.htm>.
      The technique is more exacting, and I find it more difficult, but if
      you can manage it at least you won't have to start over again.



      Coblaith Mhuimhneach
      Barony of Bryn Gwlad
      Kingdom of Ansteorra
      <mailto:Coblaith@...>
    • Ken Nye
      ... I do one of two things. If I m sewing by hand, I turn in and press the seam allowance of the slash, tapering to nothing at the point. Then I lay it, right
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2006
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        --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Catalfamo" <chriscat53@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Well I'm stuck. I need a quick tip on center front gores.

        I do one of two things.

        If I'm sewing by hand, I turn in and press the seam allowance of the
        slash, tapering to nothing at the point. Then I lay it, right side
        up, over the gore, pin, baste and stitch it into place from the
        outside with either fellstitching or backstitching. If you don't mind
        machine topstitching showing, you can machine right on the fold of the
        slash edge too.

        Second method is to make the gore square at the top. Cut the slash
        making a "Y" at the top, then treat the top and both sides as three
        separate seams. Do the top first, then lay the sides out smoothly,
        pin and stitch. I keep the straight grain on top as I'm sewing to
        keep the bias from getting pushed by the presser foot.

        With both methods you can overcast the raw edges on the inside or if
        you leave a larger seam allowance on the gore, you can turn the edge
        in and hem it to the back of the fabric, covering all the raw edges.

        K.
      • Laurie
        The most essential thing for a finished look is to make sure that the center seam of the gore (if it is a pieced gore, i.e., 2 right triangles sewn together on
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 2, 2006
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          The most essential thing for a finished look is to make sure that the
          center seam of the gore (if it is a pieced gore, i.e., 2 right
          triangles sewn together on the vertical "legs" of the right triangle)
          lines up perfectly with the center of the seam you are inserting the
          gore into.

          I usually pin the gore in place, then sew one side in place. Check
          the alignment of the center seam of the gore one more time (!) then
          sew the gore side seam right up and into the seam it has been inserted
          into. Ideally when finished, you want the gore center seam (if there
          is one) to run right up into the center seam of the side pieces, and
          the two pointy tops of the gore segments to be exactly even.

          Try to cut your pattern pieces so there is a good amount of seam
          allowance. This permits you to do a folded over seam (a "flat fell
          seam") which gives a very finished look to the inside of the garment.
          It also reinforces the seam, making it very strong.

          In the last six months, I have made quite a few gothic fitted dresses
          for myself and friends. We have discovered that strong seams are a
          GOOD thing!

          An iron is also an essential tool to this process. When you are at
          the "folding over the seam allowance" stage, using the iron to press
          it in place makes all the pieces lie down better.

          Of course, the more of these you do, the easier it gets. Good luck!

          Angela
        • Chris Catalfamo
          Thanks! I wil print out these suggestions for next time. As it is, I had too much to trim off at thetop and ended up folding it under and topstitching. I m not
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 2, 2006
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            Thanks! I wil print out these suggestions for next time. As it is, I had too much to trim off at thetop and ended up folding it under and topstitching. I'm not going to have time to do the inner garment any more than haphazardly before Pennsic because I have three other sets of garb to finish. Just out of curiosity, are there extant garments with these finishing details?

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            To: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2006 2:21 PM
            Subject: Re: [SCA-Garb] Need quick tip on centerfront points/gores


            Chris Catalfamo wrote:
            > . . .I need a quick tip on center front gores.. . .Have got it machine
            > sewn up to about an inch from the point. What do I do now?. . .I
            > already had to take it out and do it over. . .

            For future reference, the easiest way to get one that lies nice and
            flat at the tip using the machine is to begin by laying the gore along
            the cut edge of the body panel, putting the point a scant seam
            allowance above the top of the slit, and hand-sewing the first couple
            of inches on that side, then pivoting the gore around the top stitch so
            that it lies along the other cut edge and doing the same, BEFORE
            finishing the seams mechanically.

            Beginning from where you are now, you might prefer to attempt machine
            sewing to the tip <http://www.vertetsable.com/demos_goresgussets.htm>.
            The technique is more exacting, and I find it more difficult, but if
            you can manage it at least you won't have to start over again.

            Coblaith Mhuimhneach
            Barony of Bryn Gwlad
            Kingdom of Ansteorra
            <mailto:Coblaith@...>





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