Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [SCA-Garb] Speaking of pictures...

Expand Messages
  • purplkat@optonline.net
    OOHHH -- PRETTY!!!! I also would be interested in the pattern / pic / ideas. Lady Katheryne ... From: alla myskila@yahoo.com Does anyone know what the front of
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 2 7:00 AM
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      OOHHH -- PRETTY!!!!

      I also would be interested in the pattern / pic / ideas.

      Lady Katheryne


      Original Message:
      -----------------
      From: alla myskila@...

      Does anyone know what the front of this green dress with the maroon under
      it would look like? Or just a general idea of the dress and I'll go hunting
      through books in the library?

      http://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE21CX.HTML

      - Alasa

      --------------------------------------------------------------------
      mail2web - Check your email from the web at
      http://mail2web.com/ .
    • Susan Farmer
      ... I ve seen sideless surcoats over cotehardies with sleeves *sortof* like this, but they don t have the pouffy cap part of the sleeve -- the wholesleeve
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 2 7:55 AM
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        >
        > Does anyone know what the front of this green dress with the maroon
        > under it would look like? Or just a general idea of the dress and
        > I'll go hunting through books in the library?
        >
        > http://www.siue.edu/COSTUMES/PLATE21CX.HTML

        I've seen sideless surcoats over cotehardies with sleeves *sortof*
        like this, but they don't have the pouffy cap part of the sleeve --
        the wholesleeve should be maroon as well. I suspect that this is
        A Victorian Invention (either that or it's flemish -- I have seen
        similar sleeves in Flemish Garb but they're later period than
        this gown is. I have very little stuff on earlyier period
        flemish.)

        Jerusha
      • otsisto
        There is a German style, I think late 1400s, early 1500 s, that comes close. The green sleeve would be white as it would be a chemise sleeve. But from the
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 2 8:42 PM
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          There is a German style, I think late 1400s, early 1500's, that comes
          close. The green sleeve would be white as it would be a chemise sleeve.
          But from the other two women I would say that the green dress is, as was
          said, a Victorian invention or a Victorian rendition of an effigy or
          something of that nature. Another thought is that it is trying to be a
          bliant. It is possible that the person who colored the print may not have a
          lick of knowledge of costume history.

          Arian

          -----Original Message-----


          I suspect that this is
          A Victorian Invention (either that or it's flemish -- I have seen
          similar sleeves in Flemish Garb but they're later period than
          this gown is. I have very little stuff on earlyier period
          flemish.)

          Jerusha


          Helpful email addresses:
          Subscribe: SCA-Garb-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          Unsubscribe: SCA-Garb-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Main group web page:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Garb




          ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
          --
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Garb/

          b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          SCA-Garb-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • alla
          These are about as close as I ve found so far: http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/weycold1.jpg (Detail from van der Weyden s The Presentation in the Temple
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 2 11:31 PM
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            These are about as close as I've found so far:
            http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/weycold1.jpg
            (Detail from van der Weyden's "The Presentation in the Temple" from
            the Columba Altarpiece (Davies, p. 28))

            http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp123.jpg
            (Gerard David, ca. 1495 (Ainsworth, G. David, p. 123), Detail from The
            Crucifixion)

            http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75.jpg (more detail:
            http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75b.jpg )
            (Gerard David, 1509 (Ainsworth, p. 75), Detail from Virgin among Virgins)

            http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/campbellp147.jpg - I'm looking at
            the girl who is second from the right. I can't see her well enough,
            but I think that might be the same style.
            (Gerard David, ca. 1501-9 (Campbell, p. 147), The Virgin and Child
            with Saints and Donor)

            If you want more of what they said on each picture, they can be found
            here: http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/15th/index.html

            - Alasa

            --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "otsisto" <otsisto@s...> wrote:
            > There is a German style, I think late 1400s, early 1500's, that comes
            > close. The green sleeve would be white as it would be a chemise sleeve.
            > But from the other two women I would say that the green dress is, as was
            > said, a Victorian invention or a Victorian rendition of an effigy or
            > something of that nature. Another thought is that it is trying to be a
            > bliant. It is possible that the person who colored the print may not
            have a
            > lick of knowledge of costume history.
            >
            > Arian
          • otsisto
            Okay, I found a site of a dress that comes close to the green and maroon dress. The portrait is from 1520-25 by Blut.
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 2 11:51 PM
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Okay, I found a site of a dress that comes close to the green and maroon
              dress. The portrait is from 1520-25 by Blut.
              http://www.kunstkopie.de/static/motive/Lukrezia-l-Meister-vom-Heiligen-Blut-
              5871000.html

              Hope this works. I can't tell if that is a 1 or l suppose to be after it.

              Arian
              -----Original Message-----

              There is a German style, I think late 1400s, early 1500's, that comes
              close. The green sleeve would be white as it would be a chemise sleeve.
              But from the other two women
              Arian


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • wren378
              What type of material would the green dress from the 1509 painting be made out of? Would this type of dress be made in a navy or darker blue? ...
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 15, 2012
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                What type of material would the green dress from the 1509 painting be made out of? Would this type of dress be made in a navy or darker blue?

                --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "alla" <ligi1@...> wrote:
                <SNIPPED BY MOD. TRIM YOUR POSTS!!>
                >
                > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75.jpg (more detail:
                > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75b.jpg )
                > (Gerard David, 1509 (Ainsworth, p. 75), Detail from Virgin among Virgins)
                >
                <SNIPPED BY MOD. TRIM YOUR POSTS!!>
              • Michelina Medici
                The dress looks like it is made of velvet and mink like fur (not sure what the proper fur name is). Look at other dresses in this style. I thought I saw one in
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 15, 2012
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  The dress looks like it is made of velvet and mink like fur (not sure what the proper fur name is).

                  Look at other dresses in this style. I thought I saw one in a darker color but I am not trusting my memory.

                  Happy Hunting,

                  Michelina



                  ----- Original Message -----


                   




                  What type of material would the green dress from the 1509 painting be made out of? Would this type of dress be made in a navy or darker blue?

                  --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com , "alla" <ligi1@...> wrote:
                  <SNIPPED BY MOD. TRIM YOUR POSTS!!>
                  >
                  > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75.jpg (more detail:
                  > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75b.jpg )
                  > (Gerard David, 1509 (Ainsworth, p. 75), Detail from Virgin among Virgins)
                  >
                  <SNIPPED BY MOD. TRIM YOUR POSTS!!>



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Joan Silvertoppe
                  ... This appears to be a velvet fabric. A friend of mine made this garment for a Tudor ball a few years ago in a velvety damask, and it worked out wonderfully.
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 15, 2012
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On Jun 15, 2012, at 8:20 AM, wren378 wrote:

                    > What type of material would the green dress from the 1509 painting be made out of? Would this type of dress be made in a navy or darker blue?


                    This appears to be a velvet fabric. A friend of mine made this garment for a Tudor ball a few years ago in a velvety damask, and it worked out wonderfully. In modern cotton velvet/eens, it is easier to find medium to dark blues, than a decent shade of green, but depends on where you look and what is fashionable this year in velvets. You might also be able to find a nice wool that is of medium weight to have a nice drape to it.

                    Joan



                    Lady Joan Silvertoppe
                    A Gentlewoman's Accounts http://www.kimiko1.com

                    Tudor Lady's Wardrobe pattern.
                    http://www.margospatterns.com/Products/TudorLady.html








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • otsisto
                    Now that I have the artist s name, the painting is from the Netherlands, not from the German states. Other paintings by the artist http://tinyurl.com/c5r2b8d
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 16, 2012
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Now that I have the artist's name, the painting is from the Netherlands, not
                      from the German states.
                      Other paintings by the artist
                      http://tinyurl.com/c5r2b8d
                      http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gerard_David_003.jpg
                      http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gerard_David_008.jpg

                      The short style of sleeve, if iam remembering right, is more common in the
                      late 1400s but would still be in use by 1509 but is being replace by the
                      tudor style sleeve. Again, if i am remebering right.

                      -----Original Message-----
                      What type of material would the green dress from the 1509 painting be made
                      out of? Would this type of dress be made in a navy or darker blue?

                      --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "alla" <ligi1@...> wrote:
                      > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75.jpg (more detail:
                      > http://www.uvm.edu/%7Ehag/sca/15th/ainsworthgdp75b.jpg )
                      > (Gerard David, 1509 (Ainsworth, p. 75), Detail from Virgin among Virgins)
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.