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RE: [SCA-Garb] copyright info (digression)

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  • otsisto
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 1 1:58 AM
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      < McCall's has on their pattern packaging "Sold for individual home use only
      and not for commercial or manufacturing purposes." >

      I have seen people at Cons and Rens selling costumes made from McCall's
      patterns.
      So am I interpreting the "Sold for...." wrong? That it is the pattern itself
      and not the garment made from the patterns that it is referring too?
      If I have been interpreting the line correctly then those individuals
      selling the garments made from the McCall's pattern could get in trouble, I
      doubt they really will but if caught.

      Arian


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jewels and Karl
      Doing a search online I found a good response to the question of using patterns to make stuff to sell. It was at www.doll- hospital.com If you click on
      Message 2 of 25 , Apr 1 6:21 AM
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        Doing a search online I found a good response to the question of
        using patterns to make stuff to sell. It was at www.doll-
        hospital.com If you click on patterns and go to the bottom it has a
        link for an article that McCalls had on this topic. It's ten years
        old but I doubt they have changed their views. In a nutshell it's
        copyright infringement if you use one of their patterns to make
        things to sell even if you change it a bit. I would guess that it
        would be the same for most of the other pattern companies.

        BTW I just joined the group this week. Have no idea what SCA
        involves. Just checking it out.

        Julia

        --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "otsisto" <otsisto@s...> wrote:

        > I have seen people at Cons and Rens selling costumes made from
        McCall's
        > patterns.
      • otsisto
        Welcome Julia! SCA =Society for Creative Anachronism. Medieval and Renaissance Stuff :) There s a website for SCA This site, Medieval and Renaissance
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 1 9:03 PM
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          Welcome Julia!
          SCA =Society for Creative Anachronism.
          Medieval and Renaissance Stuff :)
          There's a website for SCA
          This site, Medieval and Renaissance garb/costume.
          I'll let someone more eloquent with words tell you more if you are
          interested.

          Arian
          -----Original Message-----

          BTW I just joined the group this week. Have no idea what SCA
          involves. Just checking it out.

          Julia

          --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "otsisto" <otsisto@s...> wrote:

          > I have seen people at Cons and Rens selling costumes made from
          McCall's
          > patterns.





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        • J. May
          You are always free to approach the pattern company and ask for permission to sell items made from it. Sometimes there is a fee, but it s better than a
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 2 10:12 AM
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            You are always free to approach the pattern company and ask for permission
            to sell items made from it. Sometimes there is a fee, but it's better than a
            copyright infringement fine. At the fabric store I work for we encourage
            contacting them.

            FYI- this issue came up with licensed fabric this winter. Things like Disney
            and college logos are labeled "for home use only". The companies were
            cracking down on folks selling things on eBay and other electronic forums.

            Samia

            -----Original Message-----

            Doing a search online I found a good response to the question of
            using patterns to make stuff to sell. It was at www.doll-
            hospital.com If you click on patterns and go to the bottom it has a
            link for an article that McCalls had on this topic. It's ten years
            old but I doubt they have changed their views. In a nutshell it's
            copyright infringement if you use one of their patterns to make
            things to sell even if you change it a bit. I would guess that it
            would be the same for most of the other pattern companies.

            BTW I just joined the group this week. Have no idea what SCA
            involves. Just checking it out.

            Julia
          • annavon2002
            I sew for people and deal with the copyright issue by charging them for the pattern seperately, so they are buying their own, which I only use for them. Since
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 2 11:41 AM
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              I sew for people and deal with the copyright issue by charging them
              for the pattern seperately, so they are buying their own, which I
              only use for them. Since the "big 3" go on sale for .99 or $1.99 so
              often, I usually stock up on a few sizes. I really couldn't use one
              pattern and "mass produce" anyway, as I take the patterns and rework
              them to make them more period and also to fit the individual
              correctly. A size 6 with an A cup needs just as much refitting as a
              22 with a DD cup.....

              Antonia
            • Katie Pleasance
              Ah, isn t common sense wonderful? Katie
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 2 1:23 PM
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                Ah, isn't common sense wonderful?

                Katie

                At 07:41 PM 4/2/2004 +0000, you wrote:
                >I sew for people and deal with the copyright issue by charging them
                >for the pattern seperately, so they are buying their own, which I
                >only use for them. Since the "big 3" go on sale for .99 or $1.99 so
                >often, I usually stock up on a few sizes. I really couldn't use one
                >pattern and "mass produce" anyway, as I take the patterns and rework
                >them to make them more period and also to fit the individual
                >correctly. A size 6 with an A cup needs just as much refitting as a
                >22 with a DD cup.....
                >
                >Antonia
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >Helpful email addresses:
                > Subscribe: SCA-Garb-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                >
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                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Garb
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Jan C. Lane
                Katherine, The basic info regarding published, copyrighted material (I m speaking, of course, of modern materials) is that the designer/writer holds the
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 5 6:03 AM
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                  Katherine,

                  The basic info regarding published, copyrighted material (I'm speaking, of
                  course, of modern materials) is that the designer/writer holds the
                  copyright, period. They may sell, for example, the screen rights, but the
                  writer still holds the copyright on the original material. A writer or
                  designer gives a magazine permission to publish his/her work in return for a
                  monetary consideration. (I'm not talking about staff writers here, as I'm
                  not sure of their status re. copyrights.) However, even if the design or
                  article is created by a staff writer, such things are not to be copied
                  except for personal use. Period. Excerpts may be used for scholarly
                  research or educational purposes, but only with proper credit. (Yes, the
                  dreaded foot note--although in-body notes are certainly easier to use
                  *grin*) As an English teacher (in a former life) and a budding quilt
                  designer, I'm very sensitive to such issues.

                  If anyone else addressed this issue before me, I do apologize. I'm terribly
                  behind in my e-mail.

                  In service,

                  Jannifer
                • Patricia Fee
                  I well understand the copyright laws. I am a published author. Both of magazine articles and a book. Also many short stories. I also design embroidery and
                  Message 8 of 25 , Apr 5 10:03 AM
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                    I well understand the copyright laws. I am a published author. Both of magazine articles and a book. Also many short stories.

                    I also design embroidery and cross stitch charts, working with other artists as well as my own designs.

                    You're right when you say that the original rights belong to the designer/author however those rights are sold to the publisher for a set period of time. It is after that period of time that the "rights" revert to the designer/author.

                    Its during this time that the gray area occurs. Control of the design/,story, book etc. belongs to the publisher who has purchased the rights. Its is the Publisher's copyright "rights" that hold during this period.( unless other arrangements have been made between the designer/author and the Publisher) If in fact the Publisher gives a tacit permission to copy for personal use, then every time the design is used, it is legal as long as it is not sold, as long as the source was that specific design etc in that specific publication.

                    This applies to designs only. The instances that you mentioned concerning books and other literary products hold true.
                    Katherine

                    "Jan C. Lane" <jclaneva@...> wrote:
                    Katherine,

                    The basic info regarding published, copyrighted material (I'm speaking, of
                    course, of modern materials) is that the designer/writer holds the
                    copyright, period. They may sell, for example, the screen rights, but the
                    writer still holds the copyright on the original material. A writer or
                    designer gives a magazine permission to publish his/her work in return for a
                    monetary consideration. (I'm not talking about staff writers here, as I'm
                    not sure of their status re. copyrights.) However, even if the design or
                    article is created by a staff writer, such things are not to be copied
                    except for personal use. Period. Excerpts may be used for scholarly
                    research or educational purposes, but only with proper credit. (Yes, the
                    dreaded foot note--although in-body notes are certainly easier to use
                    *grin*) As an English teacher (in a former life) and a budding quilt
                    designer, I'm very sensitive to such issues.

                    If anyone else addressed this issue before me, I do apologize. I'm terribly
                    behind in my e-mail.

                    In service,

                    Jannifer






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                  • Susan Farmer
                    ... I think staff writers come under work for hire and as such, the employer owns copyright rather than the writer. Jerusha
                    Message 9 of 25 , Apr 5 11:50 AM
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                      > Katherine,
                      >
                      > The basic info regarding published, copyrighted material (I'm speaking, of
                      > course, of modern materials) is that the designer/writer holds the
                      > copyright, period. They may sell, for example, the screen rights, but the
                      > writer still holds the copyright on the original material. A writer or
                      > designer gives a magazine permission to publish his/her work in return for a
                      > monetary consideration. (I'm not talking about staff writers here, as I'm
                      > not sure of their status re. copyrights.)

                      I think staff writers come under "work for hire" and as such, the "employer"
                      owns copyright rather than the writer.

                      Jerusha
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