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Embroidering on clothes

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  • Cindy
    I am starting my first non-camping garb project in the next few days and would like to hear people s experience on embroidering on clothing. I am planning a
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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      I am starting my first non-camping garb project in the next few days and
      would like to hear people's experience on embroidering on clothing. I
      am planning a black linen t-tunic with a keyhole neckline for my
      husband. I'd like to embroider a design around the neckline, along the
      hem of the sleeves and when time allows, along the bottom hem. We will
      be adapting a design from Celtic Embroidery (an interlaced design made
      by 3 or so rows of chain stitch). Is it better to embroider before it
      is cut out or after it is sewn? Obviously if I want the design to
      circle the sleeves I will need to do that after sewing - before or after
      hemming though? What is the best tool to use to mark the design? What
      is the best way to transfer the pattern? I have a gray pencil that I
      use to mark quilting designs on dark fabric - is there something better?
      I want to use a gold metallic for the embroidery - what threads have
      people had good experiences using or bad ones too for that matter? I
      have done a lot of embroidery in my life - this is my first try at
      putting it on SCA garb.

      Thanks for your advice,
      Adelheid
    • Jeanne
      I recommend stitching after completion of the garment. I either stencil my design, I make my own out of transparencies. I use a soap stone pencil for dark
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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        I recommend stitching after completion of the garment. I either stencil my
        design, I make my own out of transparencies. I use a soap stone pencil for
        dark fabrics. Sometimes I use plain chalk pencils, but it only lasts a
        short while. It comes off very easy with handling. So it is helpful for
        intricate designs done in stages.

        Soffya
        http://www.aeonline.biz/Links.htm
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Cindy [mailto:crma@...]
        Sent: Friday, November 01, 2002 2:44 PM
        To: ClothiersGuild@yahoogroups.com; SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Garb] Embroidering on clothes



        I am starting my first non-camping garb project in the next few days and
        would like to hear people's experience on embroidering on clothing. I
        am planning a black linen t-tunic with a keyhole neckline for my
        husband. I'd like to embroider a design around the neckline, along the
        hem of the sleeves and when time allows, along the bottom hem. We will
        be adapting a design from Celtic Embroidery (an interlaced design made
        by 3 or so rows of chain stitch). Is it better to embroider before it
        is cut out or after it is sewn? Obviously if I want the design to
        circle the sleeves I will need to do that after sewing - before or after
        hemming though? What is the best tool to use to mark the design? What
        is the best way to transfer the pattern? I have a gray pencil that I
        use to mark quilting designs on dark fabric - is there something better?
        I want to use a gold metallic for the embroidery - what threads have
        people had good experiences using or bad ones too for that matter? I
        have done a lot of embroidery in my life - this is my first try at
        putting it on SCA garb.

        Thanks for your advice,
        Adelheid




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dragonflye13
        ... you sew. It makes life easier.-Ysabelot who is going to be on vacation( Going from An Tir brrrrrr to Arizona) for 3 weeks will miss you all.
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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          --- I Have found it is best to embroider on the fabric after you cut, but before
          you sew. It makes life easier.-Ysabelot who is going to be on vacation( Going
          from An Tir brrrrrr to Arizona) for 3 weeks will miss you all.
        • Lila Richards
          ... For information on early-period embroidery stitches and designs (mostly Viking), there s a web-page by Thora Sharptooth (Carolyn Priest-Dorman), which I
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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            > I am starting my first non-camping garb project in the next few days and
            > would like to hear people's experience on embroidering on clothing. I
            > am planning a black linen t-tunic with a keyhole neckline for my
            > husband. I'd like to embroider a design around the neckline, along the
            > hem of the sleeves and when time allows, along the bottom hem. We will
            > be adapting a design from Celtic Embroidery (an interlaced design made
            > by 3 or so rows of chain stitch).

            For information on early-period embroidery stitches and designs (mostly
            Viking), there's a web-page by Thora Sharptooth (Carolyn Priest-Dorman),
            which I found by doing a search for 'Early Medieval Embroidery'. and, on
            Cynthia Virtue's site, there's an article by Heather Rose Jones,
            'Archaeological Sewing', which gives a run-down on what stitches were found
            where, and when.

            > Is it better to embroider before it
            > is cut out or after it is sewn? Obviously if I want the design to
            > circle the sleeves I will need to do that after sewing - before or after
            > hemming though?

            On the whole, it's probably easier before the garment is sewn together, but
            sometimes it's easier to place a design accurately after the dress is put
            together. For the sleeve, I'd be inclined to embroider begore hemming, so
            the hem (if it's wide enough) can hide and protect the back of the
            embroidery.

            > What is the best tool to use to mark the design? What
            > is the best way to transfer the pattern? I have a gray pencil that I
            > use to mark quilting designs on dark fabric - is there something better?

            I tend to use embroidery tracing paper, then go over the design with a
            ballpoint pen or a pencil, because I find the tracing stuff tends to rub off
            rather easily. If I were simply drawing the design on the fabric, I'd
            probably use something like your pencil.

            > I want to use a gold metallic for the embroidery - what threads have
            > people had good experiences using or bad ones too for that matter? I
            > have done a lot of embroidery in my life - this is my first try at
            > putting it on SCA garb.

            I've not, so far, discovered a metallic thread that's easy to embroider
            with - it tends to fray very easily, and I'm told couching is the best way
            of applying it (as was done in period), so you might want to consider using
            that instead of chain stitch. You could also try just using very short
            lengths of thread.

            Sinech.
            ________________________
            An Fhirinne in aghaidh an tSaoil
            (The Truth against the World)
          • Christina L Biles
            For anything solid, I prefer to embroider on a different cloth and then blind stitch to the garment. That doesn t work if the design has too many open areas
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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              For anything solid, I prefer to embroider on a different cloth and then
              blind stitch to the garment. That doesn't work if the design has too many
              open areas for the ground to show through, though. Another method is to
              draw your design on Solvy - the water soluble variant - and baste it to
              your garment. When done, immerse in water and the Solvy dissolves. I
              prefer to baste in the outline of my garment, embroider on the whole cloth
              and then cut. (Of course, I embroider slowly and not cutting means being
              able to readjust the size later...)

              Gold thread - nothing beats the real thing. That said, which kind of gold
              thread available from the standard hobby/needlework store I use depends on
              the style of embroidery. I have some on a spool which acts as a large
              thread or can be separated into smaller that I like a lot (can't remember
              the brand), but for couching I prefer Kreiniks gold cords.

              -Magdalena
            • Rosine
              I embroider after the garment is completed, except for two areas - around the shoulders (if going far beyond the neck opening) and along the joining edge of a
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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                I embroider after the garment is completed, except for two areas - around
                the shoulders (if going far beyond the neck opening) and along the joining
                edge of a sleeve if there is one half-way or so towards the cuff. For that,
                I like to finish the seams/neckline first, do the embroidery, then finish
                the rest of the garment and embroider everywhere else. This is based on how
                much fabric I can hold in one hand as I never use hoops - so running my arm
                up the entire length of the garment to reach the shoulders or inside the
                sleeve is a pain.
                I use washable markers to place my design after double-checking on a
                scrap to insure that the marker actually does wash out (simply running it
                under tap water will show you). Since crayola puts out markers clearly
                labeled "washable" and they are more lawsuit-aware than I am, that's the
                brand I use. (I figure they wouldn't label it "washable" unless they were
                darn sure that their dye would come out, even when used by a two-year-old...
                but I check every time anyway.)

                In all cases (neckline, sleeve edges and hems) I use my embroidery to
                help sew down the turned-under portion of the fabric on the inside of the
                garment if it's within the design area of my embroidery - and don't worry
                about knots. The back side of embroidered areas in the period stuff I've
                seen would make my grandmother weep...

                Definitely make sure that your thread shrinks (or doesn't shrink) at the
                same rate as the garment you are using it on! I have a (fortunitously)
                lovely shirred skirt that didn't start out that way - but was after I washed
                and dried it.

                Rosine
              • Aspasia Moonwind
                I embroider a neckline before I sew it. I draw it on the cloth. If there is a facing, I use this for the pattern. A square neckline can now be adjusted
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 1, 2002
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                  I embroider a neckline before I sew it. I draw it on the cloth. If there
                  is a facing, I use this for the pattern. A square neckline can now be
                  adjusted easier so the design comes out even. For a round neckline I sew it
                  together at the shoulders only. Also, the facing can be turned to the
                  outside too.
                  Sleeves, it depends on how tight they are. If loose, I do it after the
                  dress is made. If tight, I cut them out then embroidery them and just be
                  careful things are lined up right when sewn.
                  Hems are done after I'm finished so I can keep it the same distance from the
                  hem. The hem is usually not cut straight. This way I can measure how far
                  up from the hem it should be and draw lines for it to follow.
                  *(*Aspasia

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