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Keeping Neck Warm

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  • Carol Botteron
    Because of an old injury I need to keep the back of my neck warm even in warm weather. In modern clothing I wear turtlenecks or scarves. I want to make either
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 5, 2011
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      Because of an old injury I need to keep the back of my neck warm even
      in warm weather. In modern clothing I wear turtlenecks or scarves.

      I want to make either a bodice with a high neck (as high as a modern
      turtleneck) or headgear that covers my neck well enough to keep it
      warm. The coifs I have seen do not look warm enough, even for a warm
      room. A shawl does not do the job.

      Advice and example pictures would be appreciated. I'm open to any
      era or area, and I can sew. adTHANKSvance!
    • Christine Taylor
      One word: HOOD. Hoods with shoulder mantles are period from at least the 11th century on up to 15th. (Not sure about 16th.) Their shaping and fastening changed
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 6, 2011
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        One word: HOOD.

        Hoods with shoulder mantles are period from at least the 11th century on up
        to 15th. (Not sure about 16th.) Their shaping and fastening changed somewhat
        over time but not a great deal. This is absolutely the way to go, especially
        since you can wear your hood on or off your head and the mantling still
        stays snug around your neck and shoulders.

        Caitlin

        -----Original Message-----
        From: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Carol Botteron
        Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 7:33 PM
        To: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Garb] Keeping Neck Warm

        Because of an old injury I need to keep the back of my neck warm even
        in warm weather. In modern clothing I wear turtlenecks or scarves.
      • Joan Silvertoppe
        I just made a black wool gown from the 1570s Elizabethan style, that has the back and sides of the neck up high (the front is open in a V - based on an effigy
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 6, 2011
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          I just made a black wool gown from the 1570s Elizabethan style, that has the back and sides of the neck up high (the front is open in a V - based on an effigy of the period). Even without wearing a proper ruff and with a high necked smock, I found the back of the neck yesterday was a little warm while wearing this indoors. It may be what you need. Most high necked bodice doublets have full collars which is also an option.

          I don't have much of a write up on this outfit, as I haven't finished it fully, but you can see a photo of me wearing it with a side view to see the collar on this page
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/claughter/6167095447/in/set-72157627577029003
          For whatever help it may offer, my dress diary entries can be found here:
          http://kimikosews.livejournal.com/tag/maas_embroideress

          The basic pattern concept for this garment was taken from The Tudor Tailor book, although somewhat modified. I drape my bodices so it was not taken directly, but the info is there.

          Joan

          Lady Joan Silvertoppe
          A Gentlewoman's Accounts http://www.kimiko1.com

          Tudor Lady's Wardrobe pattern.
          http://www.margospatterns.com/Products/TudorLady.html



          On Nov 5, 2011, at 7:33 PM, Carol Botteron wrote:

          > I want to make either a bodice with a high neck (as high as a modern
          > turtleneck)



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Charles
          Also look at German Renaissance. There are multiple high-necked options, one of which is sometimes called a goller. It is a black woolen partlet worn over
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 6, 2011
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            Also look at German Renaissance. There are multiple high-necked options, one of which is sometimes called a goller. It is a black woolen partlet worn over the gown rather than under. This link might be to a picture of one. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ae/Marten_van_Heemskerck_002.jpg There is a lot going on with that dress, and it's hard to see because it's black, but I'm pretty sure that is a gooler. I can't find a better link at the moment.

            You could also do an Elizabethan doublet bodice, which has a high neck. And also and Elizabathan kirtle, which is a high-necked overgown, I can't find links to good pics for either.

            Rashid

            --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, Carol Botteron <botteron@...> wrote:
            >
            > Because of an old injury I need to keep the back of my neck warm even
            > in warm weather. In modern clothing I wear turtlenecks or scarves.
            >
            > I want to make either a bodice with a high neck (as high as a modern
            > turtleneck) or headgear that covers my neck well enough to keep it
            > warm. The coifs I have seen do not look warm enough, even for a warm
            > room. A shawl does not do the job.
            >
            > Advice and example pictures would be appreciated. I'm open to any
            > era or area, and I can sew. adTHANKSvance!
            >
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