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Re: Max Martin's interpritation of Queen Arnegunde

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  • Quokkaqueen
    ... According to the brief summary in in issue 59 of The Compleat Anachronist that covers Women s Garb in Northern Europe, 450-1000 C.E.
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 3, 2010
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      <<snip>>
      > as far as fabrics for this period goes...is a plain silk twill appropriate? or what about herringbone?
      <<snip>>

      According to the brief summary in in issue 59 of "The
      Compleat Anachronist" that covers "Women's Garb in Northern Europe, 450-1000 C.E." (I mentioned it here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Garb/message/106128 you can buy it cheaply online from https://stockclerk.sca.org/ if nobody local has a copy), and assuming we're still talking about Arnegunde, not Kentish dress (you'd need to look at Penelope Walton Rogers 2006. _Cloth and Clothing in Early Anglo-Saxon England AD 450-700._for that...) it says:

      "The woman's smock and leggings were... wool (France-Lanord p. 85). Her veil was of silk samite (France-Lanord p. 84). The violet silk garment['s].... weft was linen and its warp a mixed cotton and silk (France-Lanord p. 82).... The red silk twill gown revealed a silk weft and a warp "very probably of vegetable origin"... (France-Lanord p. 83)."

      They're quoting:
      France-Lanord, A. 1979. "La fouille en laboratoire: méthodes et résultats." _Dossiers de l'Archéologie_ vol. 32.

      So, it looks like a silk twill is fine. Not sure about a herringbone, though.

      ~Asfridhr

      <<snip>>
      > sorry for asking so many questions...i did go to two libraries today, and found 1 useful paragraph about fabrics, but it didn't give anything as specific as i wanted. hopefully this weekend i will make it down to the LA central library. until then, thank you again for all the help!
      <<snip>>
    • Laurie Taylor
      Greetings, I am cutting a cloak, the half-circle style as shown in Hill & Bucknell, The Evolution of Fashion 1066-1930, c.1100 male/female. I opted for this
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 9, 2010
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        Greetings,



        I am cutting a cloak, the half-circle style as shown in Hill & Bucknell, The
        Evolution of Fashion 1066-1930, c.1100 male/female. I opted for this one
        because it fit well on my fabric without piecing. The fabric is a very dark
        charcoal, almost black, woolen-like, though probably acrylic. It’s what I
        had on hand so, even if the color isn’t period, it’s going to happen.



        I’m stuck on lining. I’m guessing that it should be a linen, though I was
        eye-balling a super-fine 130 wool from my stash. The color isn’t good
        though, I suppose – being a blue-gray, almost faded teal, but it sure feels
        nice.



        What would be a good color, keeping maybe sort of period? I’m not wanting
        to go buying more fabric – I own too darn much! But I’m not sure that I’ve
        got anything in a good color/fiber combination.



        Also, quite a few of the cloaks of c.1066-1260 or thereabouts are greater
        than ½ circle and harder to fit on fabric without piecing. I did the math
        to enlarge one particular pattern, and it would need a piece of fabric
        around 105” x 120” approximately. How would you piece that, or how might it
        have been pieced in period, assuming that they didn’t just weave a fabric to
        a dimension suitable for that garment?



        Wide open to thoughts and ideas!



        Gelleia de Horslaporte

        Barony of Twin Moons & College of Brymstonne – ‘cause after all, one can’t
        have too much garb or too much fun!



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Charles
        Here is a link for a pattern. Shoulder darts are optional. It does show the kind of piecing they used in period because it is based on extant examples.
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 9, 2010
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          Here is a link for a pattern. Shoulder darts are optional. It does show the kind of piecing they used in period because it is based on extant examples.

          http://www.feoragdubh.eastkingdom.org/Nutshell_2004-01/nab_cloaks.htm

          I would expect the piecing on other segments of the circle to be similar, in other words, chunks, rather than gored segments. Evidence does not seem to indicate that they were weaving fabrics extra large to make cloaks from, unless is was on a warp-weighted loom. I think (but I'm not completely sure) that except for the far northern boondocks, warp weighted looms were not used much by theis period.

          I actually did a gored layout on the computer one time and discovered that it realy only gives you a scant few inches more cloak for the same amout of fabric. Even though a gored pattern seems to waste less fabric, it actually takes all the scraps you would have leftover from a "chunk" layout and just turns them into seam allowances, rather than actual cloak size. So you get a teensy bit bigger cloak and have to sew hundreds more inches of seams for not much difference.

          If I was going to do a cloak using more than 1/2 a circle, I'd lay it out so both front edges are on the staight grain. They will lay much better that way.

          Rashid


          --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "Laurie Taylor" <costumeraz1@...> wrote:
          > Also, quite a few of the cloaks of c.1066-1260 or thereabouts are greater
          > than ½ circle and harder to fit on fabric without piecing. I did the math
          > to enlarge one particular pattern, and it would need a piece of fabric
          > around 105" x 120" approximately. How would you piece that, or how might it
          > have been pieced in period, assuming that they didn't just weave a fabric to
          > a dimension suitable for that garment?
          >
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