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Lurker out of hiding needing help

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  • Shadow Harper
    I have in the past worn more fitted garments, but post surgery and not being a small person, and needing to sit as well as stand at times to play harp or
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 14, 2009
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      I have in the past worn more fitted garments, but post surgery and not being a small person, and needing to sit as well as stand at times to play harp or whatever, I find the fitted garments (anything tight from waist to chest/armpit area) are simply no longer wearable.
       
      I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me!  Can someone point me to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like myself - simple and preferably loose. I do want to be in an appropriate period, but I'm not willing to risk health or major hours-long discomfort for one, when there must be one that will work without it. (I know, I know, but I'm old and grumpy!).
       
      Thanks so much!
       
      Shadow Harper




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ui Cainnech
      Any early period time should work (t-tunic or tunic-type dresses). Roman, Byzantine, and Arabic cultures all have (from what I can tell) well-documented loose
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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        Any early period time should work (t-tunic or tunic-type dresses). Roman,
        Byzantine, and Arabic cultures all have (from what I can tell)
        well-documented loose garments.

        YiS,
        Ciaran

        2009/12/14 Shadow Harper <shadow_harper01@...>

        >
        >
        > I have in the past worn more fitted garments, but post surgery and not
        > being a small person, and needing to sit as well as stand at times to play
        > harp or whatever, I find the fitted garments (anything tight from waist to
        > chest/armpit area) are simply no longer wearable.
        >
        > I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me! Can someone point me
        > to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like myself -
        > simple and preferably loose. I do want to be in an appropriate period, but
        > I'm not willing to risk health or major hours-long discomfort for one, when
        > there must be one that will work without it. (I know, I know, but I'm old
        > and grumpy!).
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Christine Taylor
        13th century Europe is your best friend. The gowns/tunics were loose and could be layered if you wish. Beautiful colors and fabrics too, but very comfortable.
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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          13th century Europe is your best friend. The gowns/tunics were loose and
          could be layered if you wish. Beautiful colors and fabrics too, but very
          comfortable. Rather like wearing a favorite bathrobe and looking great in
          it.

          I vote for that.

          A good starting point is the Maciejowski Bible:
          http://redravens.org/article/maciejowski-bible. There are lots of combat
          pictures but also plenty of pictures of civilian women. BTW, I'm in the
          early 12th century but I keep casting longing glances at the 13th.

          Caitlin

          -----Original Message-----
          From: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Shadow Harper
          Sent: Monday, December 14, 2009 8:16 PM
          To: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SCA-Garb] Lurker out of hiding needing help

          I have in the past worn more fitted garments, but post surgery and not being
          a small person, and needing to sit as well as stand at times to play harp or
          whatever, I find the fitted garments (anything tight from waist to
          chest/armpit area) are simply no longer wearable.
           
          Shadow Harper
        • Vicky Eisenstadt
          the 13th century also has a very simple elegance to it :) Alysoun On Tue, Dec 22, 2009 at 10:55 AM, Christine Taylor
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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            the 13th century also has a very simple elegance to it :)

            Alysoun

            On Tue, Dec 22, 2009 at 10:55 AM, Christine Taylor <christine@...
            > wrote:

            >
            >
            > 13th century Europe is your best friend. The gowns/tunics were loose and
            > could be layered if you wish. Beautiful colors and fabrics too, but very
            > comfortable. Rather like wearing a favorite bathrobe and looking great in
            > it.
            >
            > I vote for that.
            >
            > A good starting point is the Maciejowski Bible:
            > http://redravens.org/article/maciejowski-bible. There are lots of combat
            > pictures but also plenty of pictures of civilian women. BTW, I'm in the
            > early 12th century but I keep casting longing glances at the 13th.
            >
            > Caitlin
            --
            "Courage is the virtue of deeds... courtesy is the virtue of language."
            Baron Giovanni di Fiamma


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Christine Taylor
            Agreed! I think it s a well-nigh ideal combination of comfort and elegance. I m staying in the early 12th because I love that costuming too, plus I prefer the
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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              Agreed! I think it's a well-nigh ideal combination of comfort and elegance.
              I'm staying in the early 12th because I love that costuming too, plus I
              prefer the time period for my persona. But I'm going to make the occasional
              foray into 13th; it's not that different from 12th century non-court dress.
              (By "court" I mean tightly laced gowns).

              Caitlin

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of Vicky Eisenstadt
              Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2009 8:04 AM
              To: SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SCA-Garb] Lurker out of hiding needing help

              the 13th century also has a very simple elegance to it :)

              Alysoun

              On Tue, Dec 22, 2009 at 10:55 AM, Christine Taylor <christine@...
              > wrote:

              >
              >
              > 13th century Europe is your best friend. The gowns/tunics were loose and
              > could be layered if you wish. Beautiful colors and fabrics too, but very
              > comfortable. Rather like wearing a favorite bathrobe and looking great in
              > it.
              >
            • Antoinette
              Here are a few suggestions: A belted Houpalon- from what I have seen the belt is on the ribcage. I believe this may be the gothic styling. the sideless surcoat
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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                Here are a few suggestions:
                A belted Houpalon- from what I have seen the belt is on the ribcage. I
                believe this may be the gothic styling.
                the sideless surcoat -as long as the inderdress is not uncomfortable. I
                do believe I have seen this with loose under dresses, not just the
                fitted coat hardies.
                or early Norse-minimal shaping, loose fit, ease of wear and can easily
                be adjusted for any weather.

                Any of these would give you freedom of body. Also if you wanted to go
                later period the Elizabethan Spanish styles include some loose gowns. I
                have not done extensive research into them but I believe that the
                looseness starts with the first layers all the way through. The styling
                of this is covered in "the Tudor Tailor"

                Anthoinette Genheimer

                Check out my Yahoo food group: http://groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/raging_food



                Shadow Harper wrote:
                >
                > I have in the past worn more fitted garments, but post surgery and not
                > being a small person, and needing to sit as well as stand at times to
                > play harp or whatever, I find the fitted garments (anything tight from
                > waist to chest/armpit area) are simply no longer wearable.
                >
                > I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me! Can someone point
                > me to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like
                > myself - simple and preferably loose. I do want to be in an
                > appropriate period, but I'm not willing to risk health or major
                > hours-long discomfort for one, when there must be one that will work
                > without it. (I know, I know, but I'm old and grumpy!).
                >
                > Thanks so much!
                >
                > Shadow Harper
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
              • Dianne
                I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me! Can someone point me to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like myself - simple
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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                  I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me! Can someone point me to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like myself - simple and preferably loose. I do want to be in an appropriate period, but I'm not willing to risk health or major hours-long discomfort for one, when there must be one that will work without it. (I know, I know, but I'm old and grumpy!).>>

                  Late Elizabethan kirtle and loose gown. Simple, elegant, and comfortable.

                  Laurensa




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Lady Biya
                  13th century ASIA is also loose! The reason why I took a second persona is because I go sick and tired of just how loose those dresses really are after more
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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                    13th century ASIA is also loose!

                    The reason why I took a second persona is because I go sick and tired of
                    just how loose those dresses really are after more than 10 years of wearing
                    them!!! I could have gained 70 pounds and no one would have been the wiser
                    when I wore my garb, the dress is so loose! Talking about a good dress for
                    pregnancy!

                    I got so tired of it I had to add a second persona so people could actually
                    see I really am nice and thin! 16th century european shows off my figure
                    nicely.

                    So....if you really want something loose and comfortable, the Jurchen qi-pau
                    is a nice choice if you don't mind wearing something Asian and dealing with
                    the challenge of sewing on frog closures.

                    Plus you can use a folkwear pattern "chinese jackets" in view B (unlined hip
                    length and then extend down to your proper length) to make your garb--rather
                    than plotting out with a piece of chalk on your fabric. Period length for
                    women is about 4 inches above the base of your ankles.


                    I like this pattern because I did NOT inherit my mother's talent for sewing
                    and I'm afraid that with me, practice does NOT make perfect! If I want
                    perfect garb, I acquire it by writing a check to someone who seriously knows
                    what she is doing and genuinely has the ability that I lack!

                    So the pattern keeps me from being naked given that no one else knows my
                    nationality very well.


                    One great advantage about the 13th century is that this is the time of the
                    Mongol conquest--so goods are flowing much more swiftly between continents
                    than usual. So someone on the continent might be able to get a Jurchen
                    dress just through the trade contact--and likewise a Jurchen might end up
                    with something from France.


                    So you can wear a couple Jurchen dresses sometimes and not give up your
                    european persona. if you are 13th century, it is really easy to explain.


                    I also want to say that the Jurchen qi pau is NOT a mongolian deel. Asian
                    clothing styles across cultures might seem the same to those who are not
                    familiar with them--but that would be like an Asian persona saying that
                    English, French, and Italian styles are exactly the same. Those of you who
                    play these and know the fine differences can easily distinguish the small,
                    but important features that separate those three countries--Asia is no
                    different. When you realize that Mongols and Jurchens hate each other for
                    much of period (this settles down towards in the 16th century), one sees the
                    powder keg in calling them the same. it would be like insinuating a Scot is
                    an Irishman--or worse, English!


                    Anyway, I rarely have much to contribute here, so I hope please kindly that
                    my suggestion is not regarded poorly.


                    -- Biya Sama
                    Laurel A. Rockefeller


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Quokkaqueen
                    Lady Biya Sama, Do you know of any links or pictures of medieval Jurchen dress? It s difficult to imagine what you are describing, and google images seems to
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 22, 2009
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                      Lady Biya Sama,

                      Do you know of any links or pictures of medieval Jurchen dress? It's difficult to imagine what you are describing, and google images seems to only produce photos of the modern qipao/cheongsam.

                      Thanks in advance,
                      Asfridhr

                      --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, Lady Biya <aisinbiya@...> wrote:
                      <<snip>>
                      > So....if you really want something loose and comfortable, the Jurchen qi-pau
                      > is a nice choice if you don't mind wearing something Asian and dealing with
                      > the challenge of sewing on frog closures.
                      <<snip>>
                    • Lady Biya
                      Yes...you can see it very clearly on the pattern: http://folkwear.com/114.html. I can also email you privately a personal photo of me in some court garb.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 23, 2009
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                        Yes...you can see it very clearly on the pattern:
                        http://folkwear.com/114.html.


                        I can also email you privately a personal photo of me in some court garb.
                        Unfortunately I don't have any good photos of me in garb on flickr--the
                        nearest to adequate is this one from 9/2009
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/aisinbiya/3900415716/ which only shows me in
                        side view--but the side with all the frog closures. One caveat is that for
                        Jurchens it is NOT proper for women to wear belts. I won a queen's favor at
                        kingdom A&S championships for my aviculture research, which was on display
                        at the demo that day, so i wore a belt to show off the favor. If anyone
                        wants to pursue a Jurchen persona or wear this garb, the belt should be worn
                        ONLY for men.

                        Then again, I also do something period incorrect and often don't braid my
                        hair! What a cultural taboo! Alas laziness and comfort sometimes take
                        hold over period correctness!

                        Anyway, I will try to email you some photos if you like. I have a nice one
                        in my formal court dragon gown (black dragons, of course, since the black
                        glacier dragons are guardians of the Jurchen people--not easy to find in a
                        brocade--nearly all will be gold dragons!).



                        -- Biya Sama Fujin
                        Laurel A. Rockefeller


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Marcia Wallace
                        I m a fan of early period, 12th century when garb was loose fitting and comfortable. Tunic dresses, bliauts and surcotes are my favorite. Easy to make and
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 23, 2009
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                          I'm a fan of early period, 12th century when garb was loose fitting and
                          comfortable. Tunic dresses, bliauts and surcotes are my favorite. Easy
                          to make and wear, easy to embellish with embroidery, trims or beading so
                          they can look fabulous but still comfortable.

                          Enid

                          > I have not got a persona nailed down yet - lucky me! Can someone point
                          > me to an era when the clothing would be more suitable for someone like
                          > myself - simple and preferably loose. I do want to be in an
                          > appropriate period, but I'm not willing to risk health or major
                          > hours-long discomfort for one, when there must be one that will work
                          > without it. (I know, I know, but I'm old and grumpy!).>>
                          >
                          > Late Elizabethan kirtle and loose gown. Simple, elegant, and comfortable.
                          >
                          > Laurensa
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
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