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Re: [SCA-Garb] Re: polyester and tea

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  • Margaret Northwode
    ... You are so right on that front. If they ain t got it, it ain t happening. Margaret N. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 8 , May 4, 2009
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      >
      > try checking out Dharma Trading's website, they probably have a FAQs page
      > that can tell you. And if they don't sell the product that can do that, then
      > it doesn't exist.
      >
      > Rashid
      >
      >
      You are so right on that front. If they ain't got it, it ain't happening.

      Margaret N.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • rosiethayer
      I just successfully dyed a small piece of polyester, about 1/16 yard, not too thick. I used the ink from Sharpie permanent ink pens. The little piece of
      Message 2 of 8 , May 15, 2009
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        I just successfully dyed a small piece of polyester, about 1/16 yard, not too thick.

        I used the ink from Sharpie permanent ink pens.

        The little piece of polyester washed beautifully.

        How to do this to larger pieces of fabric, I don't know.

        Again, apologies for the atrocious historical inaccuracies of this method.

        --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "rosiethayer" <rosiethayer@...> wrote:
        >
        > [snip]... Can 100% polyester be successfully tea dyed?
      • Lady Mairin O'Cadlah
        Got quick questions. what would bleach do to 100% polyester? Even Rit dye wouldn t work on 100% polyester? Rit seems pretty potent though it is not period. I
        Message 3 of 8 , May 15, 2009
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          Got quick questions.
          what would bleach do to 100% polyester? Even Rit dye wouldn't work on 100% polyester? Rit seems pretty potent though it is not period.
          I guess some sacrifices have to be made in this economy.
          Thanks,

          Lady Mairin O'Cadlah
        • Summer Storm
          *shudders at the historical inaccuracies*  JK! :D Hey, whatever works... right? :) Congrats on the successful dyejob! Keep us posted on the how the larger
          Message 4 of 8 , May 15, 2009
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            *shudders at the historical inaccuracies*  JK! :D

            Hey, whatever works... right? :) Congrats on the successful dyejob! Keep us posted on the how the larger piece turns out and how it washes over time.

            ----------------------

            rosiethayer said:

            "I used the ink from Sharpie permanent ink pens.

            The little piece of polyester washed beautifully.

            How to do this to larger pieces of fabric, I don't know.

            Again, apologies for the atrocious historical inaccuracies of this method."


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          • Ken Nye
            ... I missed the begining of this thread, but I ll just pipe up with what little I know about this for the benefit of anyone who might be interested. The ink
            Message 5 of 8 , May 15, 2009
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              --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "rosiethayer" <rosiethayer@...> wrote:
              >
              > I just successfully dyed a small piece of polyester, about 1/16 yard, not too thick.
              >
              > I used the ink from Sharpie permanent ink pens.

              I missed the begining of this thread, but I'll just pipe up with what little I know about this for the benefit of anyone who might be interested.

              The ink from a Sharpie pen is more like a coloured varnish applied to the surface of the material. Which is perfectly fine. There is a whole class of screen-printing inks that work the same way. The ink is either printed on by pushing it through a silk-screen with a squeegee to make a pattern, or the fabric is "padded" which means that the ink is put on with big roller-things for a solid colour, then set with heat or steam or whatever, depending on the particular ink.

              To actually dye polyester is more specialized because the molecules are close together and tightly bonded so dye does not penetrate easily. The class of dye used is called "disperse dyes", and for darker than pastel shades, an auxiliary chemical called a "carrier" is added and the process is carried out at high temperatures in a pressure-cooker. Not for the home dyer, I'm afraid.

              *Some* other dyes and stains will stick to the surface of polyester for a while, but do not penetrate deeply so they will get washed off or fade easily.

              Ken.
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