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cape pattern

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  • margaret kim
    Can someone please resend the pattern for the circular cape? I had it. I sent it to print. I deleted it. Bad order.
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
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      Can someone please resend the pattern for the circular cape? I had it. I sent it to print. I deleted it. Bad order.
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    • bella_graphics
      Hi, New here...and Ditto! We have an event coming up in 3 days and it is cold! help! ... it. I sent it to print. I deleted it. Bad order.
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 6, 2007
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        Hi, New here...and Ditto! We have an event coming up in 3 days and it
        is cold! help!

        --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, margaret kim <mrgrtkim@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can someone please resend the pattern for the circular cape? I had
        it. I sent it to print. I deleted it. Bad order.
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        > http://mail.yahoo.com
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        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Robert Sandler
        Make a circle with a radius equal to the length you want, and then cut a hole in the center for your head, this radius is the size of your neck-hole. Since it
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 6, 2007
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          Make a circle with a radius equal to the length you want, and then cut
          a hole in the center for your head, this radius is the size of your
          neck-hole. Since it is unlikely that you have a piece of fabric big
          enough for the whole arc cut it out in segments, taking into account
          your seam allowance.
        • Roger Franz
          Perhaps not quite the center, since most people s heads are not centered on their torsos. Roger
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 11, 2007
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            Perhaps not quite the center, since most people's heads are not centered on
            their torsos.

            Roger

            On Tue November 6 2007 22:54:11 Robert Sandler wrote:
            > Make a circle with a radius equal to the length you want, and then cut
            > a hole in the center for your head, this radius is the size of your
            > neck-hole. Since it is unlikely that you have a piece of fabric big
            > enough for the whole arc cut it out in segments, taking into account
            > your seam allowance.
          • vanessa guerrero
            If you need to have more fabric due to the radius - I would seam up the fabric at the selvages first, then cut - rather than cut in segments. Make that seam
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 29, 2007
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              If you need to have more fabric due to the radius - I would seam up the fabric at the selvages first, then cut - rather than cut in segments. Make that seam your center back. That way, when you cut you have a completely even edge to hem.

              For a simple cape, this is what I would do:

              1. Cut two lengths of fabric 2x your desired length, plus 6".
              2. Seam on selvage 1/2 of length.
              3. Repeat 1 & 2 with lining.
              4. Lay out main fabric right side up. Lay lining fabric on top, right side down. Pin open selvages together. Mark, pin and cut together bottom hem edges (use the radius) and center head opening.
              5. Sew lining and main fabric together, leaving a 6 - 12 inch opening where you want for turning.
              6. Turn garment right side out. Steam or press.
              7. Stitch opening.
              8. Stitch an optional casing in the neck for a tie cord.
              9. Stitch 1/2 - 1 inch from bottom for stability.

              That is what I would do for a very simple, non-hooded cape. You should note that the sides will draw up several inches due to the shoulders with this pattern, but if the pattern is set long it isn't too much of a problem.

              Vanessa Guerrero



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            • Joanna Hobbins
              When lining a cloak I prefer to: Sew all seams except bottom hem and hang the cloak up for a week (or month) or so, then hem Or hem lining and face seperately
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 29, 2007
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                When lining a cloak I prefer to:

                Sew all seams except bottom hem and hang the cloak up for a week (or month)
                or so, then hem

                Or

                hem lining and face seperately (with lining being a bit shorter)


                Cloaks are heavy, fabric stretches, different fabrics stretch differently.
                I've had cloaks that were originally ankle length become drag on the ground
                due to stretch, I've also seen otherwise beautiful cloaks have weird ripple
                marks due to differential stretching.

                Jeanne


                -----Original Message-----
                If you need to have more fabric due to the radius - I would seam up the
                fabric at the selvages first, then cut - rather than cut in segments. Make
                that seam your center back. That way, when you cut you have a completely
                even edge to hem.

                For a simple cape, this is what I would do:

                1. Cut two lengths of fabric 2x your desired length, plus 6".
                2. Seam on selvage 1/2 of length.
                3. Repeat 1 & 2 with lining.
                4. Lay out main fabric right side up. Lay lining fabric on top, right
                side down. Pin open selvages together. Mark, pin and cut together bottom
                hem edges (use the radius) and center head opening.
                5. Sew lining and main fabric together, leaving a 6 - 12 inch opening
                where you want for turning.
                6. Turn garment right side out. Steam or press.
                7. Stitch opening.
                8. Stitch an optional casing in the neck for a tie cord.
                9. Stitch 1/2 - 1 inch from bottom for stability.
              • unclrashid
                ... up the fabric at the selvages first, then cut - rather than cut in segments. Definitely stay away from segments. I always thought segments would use the
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 29, 2007
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                  --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, vanessa guerrero <sheswede99@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > If you need to have more fabric due to the radius - I would seam
                  up the fabric at the selvages first, then cut - rather than cut in
                  segments.

                  Definitely stay away from segments.

                  I always thought segments would use the fabric more efficiently.
                  But just for curiousity, I used a drafting program to figure out how
                  much fabric I needed to make the same size cape using trapezoidal
                  segments and just sewing a chunk on at the selvedge or side.

                  You can save a few inches of fabric by using segments, but it
                  doesn't pay because you have to sew yards of extra seaming, and the
                  leftover fabric you could have made a hood or purse out of just ends
                  up in the seam allowances.

                  Rashid
                • vanessa guerrero
                  Jeanne, professionally speaking, you are absolutely right on cutting and hanging. ( ...I prefer to: Sew all seams except bottom hem and hang the cloak up for
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 30, 2007
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                    Jeanne, professionally speaking, you are absolutely right on cutting and hanging. ("...I prefer to: Sew all seams except bottom hem and hang the cloak up for a week...).

                    I suggested the "pillowcase method" for simplicity and speed, which is sometimes all that we have on short notice.

                    And this point you make should be re-iterated:

                    Cloaks are heavy, fabric stretches, different fabrics stretch differently.
                    I've had cloaks that were originally ankle length become drag on the ground
                    due to stretch, I've also seen otherwise beautiful cloaks have weird ripple
                    marks due to differential stretching.

                    You are absolutely correct. Since I costume for a living, I think with that "in my head" and line and drape accordingly. It was essential you mention it as well.

                    Vanessa


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