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Re: dupion, how badly does it fray?

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  • unclrashid
    ... dress? If we are using the terms in the same way, I would sy flatlining is better than bag-lining. By flatlining (interlining) I mean laying the fashion
    Message 1 of 15 , May 2, 2007
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      --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth Walpole" <ewalpole@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > 2. fabric pulling apart at the seams...

      > Would there be any difference between flat lining or bag lining the
      dress?

      If we are using the terms in the same way, I would sy flatlining is
      better than bag-lining. By flatlining (interlining) I mean laying
      the fashion fabric on top of the lining fabric, basting them together
      and then handling and sewing them like they were one piece of fabric.


      I am not entirely sure I'll actually get around to making it into a
      > proper GFD knowing my usual attitude to this sort of half finished
      but
      > wearable outfit I'll probably end up leaving it as it is and
      continue to
      > wear it over my Victorian corset.

      If I had to use dupioni for something like that, I would make
      something with a bit of ease that could be worn over some kind of
      support garment. (I blanched when I read "victorian corset", but
      that's all I'll say about that! Grin!) Unlike sturdier fabrics, I
      wouldn't make a cote style dress that was a slip-on out of dupioni, I
      would do buttons or lacing and make sure it opens for a genrous
      length. Slipping on anything other than a voluminous tunic will make
      dupioni shred at it's narrowest point.


      Rashid
    • Elizabeth Walpole
      (I blanched when I read victorian corset , but ... Well I need corsetry so I can fit it on my dressmaker s dummy rather than my own body. I ve got one
      Message 2 of 15 , May 2, 2007
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        <snip> (I blanched when I read "victorian corset", but
        > that's all I'll say about that! Grin!) Unlike sturdier fabrics, I
        > wouldn't make a cote style dress that was a slip-on out of dupioni, I
        > would do buttons or lacing and make sure it opens for a genrous
        > length. Slipping on anything other than a voluminous tunic will make
        > dupioni shred at it's narrowest point.
        >
        >
        > Rashid

        Well I need corsetry so I can fit it on my dressmaker's dummy rather than my
        own body. I've got one of those hard plastic adjustable forms that doesn't
        accurately reflect my body shape but it works OK if I put a corset over the
        top. I was going to go for lacing anyway (for this time round I'll hide the
        lacing strip I use to fit my corsets just inside the opening) I'm definitely
        not skinny enough to get away with something fitted that slips on ;-D well,
        maybe wool as wool has enough stretch but I doubt anything else would work.
        Elizabeth
        --------------------------------------------
        Yours in Servitude ;-)
        Elizabeth Beaumont
        Seneschal of the College of St. Aldhelm
        ewalpole@...
        http://au.geocities.com/e_walpole/





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      • unclrashid
        ... D well, ... would work. You d be surprised, though it does depend a bit on your body shape. Wide shoulders are the hardest shape to fit a slip-on, and a
        Message 3 of 15 , May 2, 2007
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          --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth Walpole" <ewalpole@...>
          wrote:

          > I'm definitely
          > not skinny enough to get away with something fitted that slips on ;-
          D well,
          > maybe wool as wool has enough stretch but I doubt anything else
          would work.

          You'd be surprised, though it does depend a bit on your body shape.
          Wide shoulders are the hardest shape to fit a slip-on, and a tiny
          waist might be the next hardest. Curvy is not that big a problem
          because curvy parts are way more squishable than bony parts.

          There are two real tricks to making slip on garments.

          Using a pattern with lots of shaping so that it skims the body while
          still maintaining a shape (like multiple gores or even princess type
          seams). It might be a bit looser than a lace-up dress, but if it
          skims the body evenly it will look more closely fitted than it really
          is.

          The other thing is fabrics that don't cling or have a slippery lining.

          Obviously, you can't make a slip-on Elizabethan or Tudor or truly
          supportive GFD, but many forms of gothic overgowns can be easily
          faked with a slip-on dress. (but never use dupioni, it will just
          fall apart at the stress points)

          Rashid
        • Janis James
          I m having trouble reconciling this online conversation about dupioni silk with the dupioni silk I have been sewing with for years. I m not criticising in any
          Message 4 of 15 , May 2, 2007
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            I'm having trouble reconciling this online conversation about
            dupioni silk with the dupioni silk I have been sewing with for years.
            I'm not criticising in any way........it will definitely fray if under
            stress, but I have costumes, banners and other items that have
            been used for many, many years. Have gone through the horrors
            of washers and dryers and even worse (grin) events in the rain,
            snow and sand of Northern An Tir and they still look and feel
            wonderful. I'm working on several pieces right now with it.
            I find it an excellent silk to use and think perhaps it is all in
            the application. I would just hate anyone to feel they couldn't
            use dupioni if they haven't before........although I certainly
            agree - not as corset material or in tight underarms.
            Cheers, Sine


            >Obviously, you can't make a slip-on Elizabethan or Tudor or truly
            >supportive GFD, but many forms of gothic overgowns can be easily
            >faked with a slip-on dress. (but never use dupioni, it will just
            >fall apart at the stress points)
            >
            >Rashid

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          • Karen Sherwood
            I agree! I think it s a wonderful fabric. (I m hoarding 8 precious yards of a glorious blue at the moment, destined for Italian Ren when I m done with this
            Message 5 of 15 , May 3, 2007
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              I agree! I think it's a wonderful fabric. (I'm hoarding 8 precious yards of a glorious blue at the moment, destined for Italian Ren when I'm done with this damned prom dress.) I do think it's a 'buyer beware' fabric, though...you can't just cut and sew without some thought as to how it's going to behave and how it needs to be seamed.

              OTOH, the prom dress fabric I'm using (DD's choice, arrrgh!) is that lurex/mylar stuff that frays in a weak breeze. I conquered a problem with stitching it, but I'm praying I can get the overskirt attached before it loses 3" of 'seam allowance.'

              I want to make garb, not ballgowns!

              Back to the salt mine/sewing machine.
              Cerwidwn

              ---- Janis James <seja02@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm having trouble reconciling this online conversation about
              > dupioni silk with the dupioni silk I have been sewing with for years.
              >
            • Timothy Guerinot
              Where can I get some Sharkskin Silk Suiting? unclrashid wrote: --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, Elizabeth Walpole
              Message 6 of 15 , May 3, 2007
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                Where can I get some Sharkskin Silk Suiting?

                unclrashid <unclrashid@...> wrote: --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth Walpole" <ewalpole@...>
                wrote:

                > I'm definitely
                > not skinny enough to get away with something fitted that slips on ;-
                D well,
                > maybe wool as wool has enough stretch but I doubt anything else
                would work.

                You'd be surprised, though it does depend a bit on your body shape.
                Wide shoulders are the hardest shape to fit a slip-on, and a tiny
                waist might be the next hardest. Curvy is not that big a problem
                because curvy parts are way more squishable than bony parts.

                There are two real tricks to making slip on garments.

                Using a pattern with lots of shaping so that it skims the body while
                still maintaining a shape (like multiple gores or even princess type
                seams). It might be a bit looser than a lace-up dress, but if it
                skims the body evenly it will look more closely fitted than it really
                is.

                The other thing is fabrics that don't cling or have a slippery lining.

                Obviously, you can't make a slip-on Elizabethan or Tudor or truly
                supportive GFD, but many forms of gothic overgowns can be easily
                faked with a slip-on dress. (but never use dupioni, it will just
                fall apart at the stress points)

                Rashid






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              • unclrashid
                ... Maybe from a custom tailor? big city expensive fabric stores? vintage fabric collector? Rashid
                Message 7 of 15 , May 3, 2007
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                  --- In SCA-Garb@yahoogroups.com, Timothy Guerinot <timkid628@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Where can I get some Sharkskin Silk Suiting?
                  >

                  Maybe from a custom tailor? big city expensive fabric stores? vintage
                  fabric collector?

                  Rashid
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