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Re:Cresting docs

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  • SMuth22664@xxx.xxx
    ... It may not be cresting the way we think of it but there is some interesting decoration on the fletches in the picture Grand Batard de Bourgogone (Roger
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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      > > Where can I look to documernt arrow decorations

      It may not be cresting the way we think of it but there is some interesting
      decoration on the fletches in the picture "Grand Batard de Bourgogone" (Roger
      van der Weyden, 1464) on page 161 in the book "Arm & Armor of the Medieval
      Knight" by David Edge & John Miles Paddock. There are clearly 2 small
      stripes on the cock feather. Who says cresting has to be on the shaft? Now
      I need to find this picture in color!

      Ottokar
    • Robert L Brunnemer
      Is there a possibility that the different colored feather was the cocking feather, and that would be why it was a different color? (that is not a sarcastic
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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        Is there a possibility that the different colored feather was the
        "cocking feather," and that would be why it was a different color? (that
        is not a sarcastic comment, I re-read it and it sounded that way so I
        just wanted to clarify.)

        Have a nice day!!!
        Robert
        Hugewheels@...
        Tha mi a'fluich mi kilt!!!

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      • SMuth22664@xxx.xxx
        ... Yes, I believe it is the cock feather. But, this is not just a different color feather like we often use, it has a small but distinctive patern. It would
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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          > Is there a possibility that the different colored feather was the
          > "cocking feather," and that would be why it was a different color? (that
          > is not a sarcastic comment, I re-read it and it sounded that way so I
          > just wanted to clarify.)

          Yes, I believe it is the cock feather. But, this is not just a different
          color feather like we often use, it has a small but distinctive patern. It
          would probably be more usefull for identifying the arrow than quickly
          soptting the cock feather.

          Now that I think of it check out page 107 of Hardy's "Longbow". There are
          all sorts of wild colored fletches shown there in a picture dated circa 1440.

          By the way, both refferences clearly show parabolic shaped feathers.

          Ottokar
        • BLOODSNG@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 8/3/99 6:08:53 PM Central Daylight Time, SMuth22664@aol.com writes:
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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            In a message dated 8/3/99 6:08:53 PM Central Daylight Time,
            SMuth22664@... writes:

            << Now that I think of it check out page 107 of Hardy's "Longbow". There are
            all sorts of wild colored fletches shown there in a picture dated circa 1440.

            By the way, both refferences clearly show parabolic shaped feathers.

            Ottokar >>
            Do you have the isbn # so I can try and find this book
          • BlkKnightI@xxx.xxx
            The IBSN # for Hardys longbow is IBSN0964574136 Richard
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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              The IBSN # for Hardys "longbow" is IBSN0964574136

              Richard
            • BlkKnightI@xxx.xxx
              ...
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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                In a message dated 8/3/99 10:28:34 PM, BLOODSNG@... writes:

                >
                << Now that I think of it check out page 107 of Hardy's "Longbow". There are
                all sorts of wild colored fletches shown there in a picture dated circa 1440.

                By the way, both refferences clearly show parabolic shaped feathers.

                Ottokar >>

                "Medieval Warfare" H.G Koch has a wealth of period illustrations which
                include archers of a variety of types.
                As for arrows-
                pp 122-123 from Chroniques de Froissart (1300's)-white fletches, no
                indication of cock feathers
                pp 158-159 from Chroniques d'Angletone (late 1400s)white fletches, no
                indication of cock feathers
                pp 178-179 from Histories de Nobles Princes de Hainault,(1400s)white, red,
                and green fletches, it appears that one (at least has both-perhaps a "cock
                feather"?)

                None show cresting, All show (as a matter of fact every period illustration
                in the book) the "classic""medieval" shaped fletch (I think you know the
                shape I mean) I seems both the "classic" shape and parabolic cut fletching
                was used. Pure Speculation- perhaps,War arrows made quickly and in great
                number were not fletched with parabolic feathers shapes as cutting that shape
                would take more time but "private" arrows for hunting etc. would be cut to
                parabolic due to personal preference (the archer wanted "fancy" cut fletches)
                or needed to be "more accurate" in flight.

                I offer this for informational purposes, not to contradict but to supplement
                information already offered by others (I have both previous offerings also).

                Richard
              • James W. Pratt Jr.
                Chauser refered to the huntsman with his peacock feathered arrows. I have used peacock feathers and they are quite different. James Cunningham ... (that ...
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 3, 1999
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                  Chauser refered to the huntsman with his peacock feathered arrows. I have
                  used peacock feathers and they are quite different.

                  James Cunningham


                  >From: SMuth22664@...
                  >
                  >
                  >> Is there a possibility that the different colored feather was the
                  >> "cocking feather," and that would be why it was a different color?
                  (that
                  >> is not a sarcastic comment, I re-read it and it sounded that way so I
                  >> just wanted to clarify.)
                  >
                  >Yes, I believe it is the cock feather. But, this is not just a different
                  >color feather like we often use, it has a small but distinctive patern. It
                  >would probably be more usefull for identifying the arrow than quickly
                  >soptting the cock feather.
                  >
                  >Now that I think of it check out page 107 of Hardy's "Longbow". There are
                  >all sorts of wild colored fletches shown there in a picture dated circa
                  1440.
                  >
                  >By the way, both refferences clearly show parabolic shaped feathers.
                  >
                  >Ottokar
                  >
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                • brett l wilson
                  James, I have used the flight feathers (the copper colored ones) from peacock wings, and found that they work as well as goose flight feathers. Both of these
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 4, 1999
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                    James,

                    I have used the flight feathers (the copper colored ones) from peacock
                    wings, and found that they work as well as goose flight feathers. Both
                    of these are not quite as stiff as turkey flight feathers though.

                    Leif of Crescent Moon
                    Calontir Archer

                    On Wed, 4 Aug 1999 02:10:32 -0400 "James W. Pratt Jr."
                    <cunning@...> writes:
                    >From: "James W. Pratt Jr." <cunning@...>
                    >
                    >
                    >Chauser refered to the huntsman with his peacock feathered arrows. I
                    >have
                    >used peacock feathers and they are quite different.
                    >
                    >James Cunningham

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                  • BLOODSNG@xxx.xxx
                    In a message dated 8/4/99 1:09:06 AM Central Daylight Time, cunning@foryou.net writes:
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 4, 1999
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                      In a message dated 8/4/99 1:09:06 AM Central Daylight Time,
                      cunning@... writes:

                      <<
                      Chauser refered to the huntsman with his peacock feathered arrows. I have
                      used peacock feathers and they are quite different.

                      James Cunningham
                      >>
                      the pecock feathers I used where the win feathers and I had no trouble with
                      them
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