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Re: Crossbow Sights - Multiple Questions

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  • Jack Bradley
    Do not aim the bow it takes up to much time just point, you ll be amazed how many end up in the gold Ragnar two ax
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 20, 1999
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      Do not aim the bow it takes up to much time just point, you'll be amazed how many
      end up in the gold
      Ragnar two ax

      Eric Bosley wrote:

      > From: Eric Bosley <ebosley@...>
      >
      > I'm looking for any tips on how to get more shots off with a
      > crossbow during the speed round. With my 150 lb. bow my highest has been
      > six, but four or five is more typical. If my health returns I'd like to
      > break 100 someday in the royal round. I was only able to complete rounds
      > on three days this year and barely made my average.
      > Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
      >
      > Yours in Service,
      >
      > H. L. Eric de Dragonslaire
      >
      > On Mon, 11 Oct 1999, Susan Kell wrote:
      >
      > > From: Susan Kell <skell@...>
      > >
      > > Greetings!
      > > I know superb crossbowmen who shoot WITH sights, and equally superb
      > > crossbowmen who shoot WITHOUT sights. My personal preference, as a
      > > sometime crossbowman, is WITHOUT. I feel it is more versatile, especially
      > > when shooting at unknown distances. I also prefer shooting standing --
      > > also more versatile, since standing in mud is preferable to sitting in it!
      > >
      > > FWIW, excellent shooting has been achieved both ways. Sights may provide
      > > a quicker route to "the top", but at least 2 Ludicrous Bowmen now have
      > > achieved their scores with unsighted crossbows: Lord Yaakov Avraham ben
      > > Obadiah and Master Li Kung Lo (but his best score of 124 was actually done
      > > with a handbow).
      > > -- Ygraine
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, 11 Oct 1999, Siegfried Sebastian Faust wrote:
      > >
      > > > From: Siegfried Sebastian Faust <eliwhite@...>
      > > >
      > > > Ok, I have been shooting with my crossbow for a while now, and have gotten
      > > > 'fairly' good with it ... I probably should be averaging something over 80
      > > > in the Royal Rounds ... But haven't shot enough 'official' ones currently
      > > > to see that ...
      > > >
      > > > I am currently shooting without sights, because, well, the crossbow didn't
      > > > come with them. I also shoot always standing, because, well, I like
      > > > standing better *grin*.
      > > >
      > > > The main problem I have found myself to have - is the 'immediate' sighting
      > > > on a new range. That is to say, it takes me a while each time I approach a
      > > > new range to get my sighting points down ... and often enough, you don't
      > > > have time to shoot multiple ends at each range to get yourself feeling
      > > > confident ...
      > > >
      > > > This I feel is where a sight my very much help me out, by me 'carrying' my
      > > > sighting point with me each time instead of feeling it out once there ...
      > > > Very similar to the marking points people use on their bows.
      > > >
      > > > So enough chattering, here comes the questions:
      > > >
      > > > a) Probably a silly question, but how period were sights? I've never seen
      > > > pictures of them, in fact, the only 'evidence' I have is the Renaissance
      > > > sight that Iolo sells for his crossbows. They seem to be a fairly simple
      > > > idea though ...
      > > >
      > > > b) How period (probably NOT is my guess) are the 'standard SCA sights' that
      > > > I see people using. Which are the sheets of metal punched with holes (or
      > > > the more adjustable 'tracks' with screws in them that can be moved up and
      > > > down).
      > > >
      > > > c) How exactly are these sights used? meaning ... I had assumed that one
      > > > looked through the hole in the screw (or peep point, etc.), and lined it up
      > > > with the tip of the arrow, lining both of them up with the place on the
      > > > target you wanted to hit.
      > > > A problem quickly develops though ... In doing this method of sighting,
      > > > you would have to move your stock on your shoulder for the different
      > > > distances. In fact, at 20 yards with my crossbow, I would have to
      > > > 'levitate' the stock off of my should and in front of my face to do this
      > > > kind of sighting.
      > > > So then instead is the idea that you always place the crossbow on the
      > > > EXACT same place on your shoulder, and that you use ONLY the sight point to
      > > > aim with and NOT the tip of the arrow at all?
      > > > This seems reasonable, until you start attempting to sight in targets at
      > > > farther than 40 yards .... at 50 yards my crossbow (80 lbs) puts its tip
      > > > RIGHT on the yellow, and thus is already sighted well ... but past that,
      > > > the tip is ABOVE the yellow ... So for sighting at those distances do you
      > > > start doing the sight to tip method and moving the stock lower on your
      > > > arm/chest?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Anxiously awaiting a reply ...
      > > > Siegfried
      > > >
      > > > ______________________________________________________________________
      > > > Lord Siegfried Sebastian Faust Barony of Highland Foorde
      > > > Minister of Misinformation (Chronicler & Web Minister)
      > > > http://highland-foorde.atlantia.sca.org
      > > >
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      > > > of Barony Beyond the Mountain, East Kingdom
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